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The /etc/hosts file can be used to override dns definitions, i.e. to point an hostname to a different ip.

I want to use /etc/hosts to make an alias record, i.e. to make my computer think that www.mysite.com does not point to a "hard coded" ip but instead is synonym of mychangingip.myip.com.

Can it be done?

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1  
IMHO you should grant this answer to Patrick, whose answer went beyond the factual "no you can't" to a "yes you can if you do it this way." It's just a better answer ;-) –  Kevin Nielsen Jun 6 '13 at 0:09
2  
@KevinNielsen why? The OP was asking about HTTP, not SSH. –  Alnitak Jun 11 '13 at 16:05
    
@Alnitak, I'm not challenging the veracity or value of your answer. And it is certainly true that Patrick went beyond the question's topic of an /etc/hosts-based solution. However, I suspect the reason his answer has more votes than yours is because many folks, like myself, found his answer useful in circumventing an annoying problem. I will always prefer slightly off-topic answers that empower to impeccably on-topic answers that do not. –  Kevin Nielsen Jun 11 '13 at 17:50
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@KevinNielsen fair enough, except that it's not slightly off-topic, it's completely off topic. Despite your original comment above it's not an answer to the question the OP asked therefore by definition it cannot be "a better answer". –  Alnitak Jun 11 '13 at 17:58
    
@Alnitak It's true that by the dictates of formal logic, Patrick's response doesn't answer flybywire's question as phrased. However, that is not the same thing as being off-topic. I will conclude my lobbying on Patrick's behalf by simply saying that, for a non-answer, it certainly has a great deal of utility value =) –  Kevin Nielsen Jun 11 '13 at 19:13

9 Answers 9

up vote 73 down vote accepted

/etc/hosts cannot be used (by itself) to produce hostname "aliases".

The hosts file produces the internal equivalent of A and PTR records from the DNS, i.e. mapping of hostname to IP address and vice-versa.

It cannot be used to produce the same effect as a CNAME record.

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2  
down-voter - why? –  Alnitak Jun 11 '13 at 16:05

If you want to SSH to a server (with a dynamically changing DNS entry) then you can effectively add an "alias" by (in the file ~/.ssh/config) creating an entry:

Host myAlias
    HostName mychangingip.myip.com

Then you can "ssh myAlias" (there are other directives which may be of use, e.g. User, Port etc).

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This is the most helpful answer to the author IMHO. –  Weibo Li Aug 29 at 6:22

I looked into this recently, I could not find a real solution. However, you can get partially what you want by adding a search line to /etc/resolv.conf e.g.:

search myip.com

Then it will look for mychangingip.myip.com when trying to resolve mychangingip See also the man page for resolv.conf

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This shell script might do the trick for you, if you just need to have the up-to-date IP in your hosts file and don't like the overhead of a custom DNS setup. You could for example run it regularly as a cronjob.

#!/bin/bash
# Get the dynamic IP (dirty, I know)
IP=`host -t a mychangingip.myip.com | perl -nle '/((?:\d+\.?){4})/ && print $1' | head -n1`

# Update the hosts file
if test -n "$IP"; then
    grep -v www.thesite.com /etc/hosts > /tmp/hosts
    echo "$IP www.thesite.com" >> /tmp/hosts
    cp /tmp/hosts /etc/hosts
fi
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One note of caution is if you have an entry like this :

 127.0.0.1     dev.example.com

When you actually get the request within your application (in my case ASP.NET) it will actaully have resolved to 'localhost' so you cant do things like this :

if (Request.Url.Authority == "dev.example.com) {
   // ...
}

The alias is resolved to 'localhost'. i think this behavior works as if it were a CNAME

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This can be done by running a local DNS resolver (something like dnsmasq). Check http://serverfault.com/questions/22419/set-dns-server-on-os-x-even-when-without-internet-connection

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There are service providers that will comfortably and reliably do this for you. A prominent example is dyndns.

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I had the same exact problem and I solved it by installing and using nginx on my mac. You don't need a dns server to do this. You can just take advantage of nginx's proxy_pass option to get the same effect as cname.

Once you have nginx installed and setup, you can alias first.com for second.com like this. In your /etc/hosts forward first.com traffic to 127.0.0.1.

127.0.0.1 first.com

The on your nginx config, add the following:

server {
  listen   80;
  server_name  first.com;
  access_log off;
  location / {
      proxy_pass http://second.com;
      proxy_set_header    Host            $host;
      proxy_set_header    X-Real-IP       $remote_addr;
      proxy_set_header    X-Forwarded-for $remote_addr;
      proxy_connect_timeout 300;
  }
}

This should effectively give you a cname-like setup. Hope that helps!

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I don't think so, hosts file is not really an dns server alternative. Instead of trying to figure out how to install and configure bind dns, you might want to try out filebased SheerDNS. http://threading.2038bug.com/sheerdns/ (best lightweight dns server i found through freshmeat).

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4  
SheerDNS seems highly broken: it sends back illegal DNS packets when you put a resource record type it does not recognize, it does not handle (such as SPF), it does not recognize AAAA records, it does not reply to ANY requests, etc. It seems a student experiment, not more. –  bortzmeyer Mar 16 '09 at 15:25

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