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I have a project that was working fine in .NET 3.5 SP1. Now when upgrading to .NET 4.0 I have an Automation exception occurring.

I have searched my whole project for anything related to Automation and there is nothing to do with Automation. Also a Google search doesn't help with confirming if this is a bug. The error only occurs on a few PCs and it occurs randomly. It is possible to completely disable Automation as I think it might be a .NET 4.0 bug?

Exception Source: PresentationCore
Message: Object reference not set to an instance of an object.
Stack Trace:
   at System.Windows.Automation.Peers.AutomationPeer.EnsureChildren()
   at System.Windows.Automation.Peers.AutomationPeer.UpdateChildrenInternal(Int32 invalidateLimit)
   at System.Windows.Automation.Peers.AutomationPeer.UpdateSubtree()
   at System.Windows.Automation.Peers.AutomationPeer.UpdateSubtree()
   at System.Windows.Automation.Peers.AutomationPeer.UpdatePeer(Object arg)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(Object source, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.WrappedInvoke(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.InvokeImpl()
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.runTryCode(Object userData)
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup(TryCode code, CleanupCode backoutCode, Object userData)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean ignoreSyncCtx)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.Invoke()
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.ProcessQueue()
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.WndProcHook(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at MS.Win32.HwndWrapper.WndProc(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.DispatcherCallbackOperation(Object o)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(Object source, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.WrappedInvoke(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.InvokeImpl(DispatcherPriority priority, TimeSpan timeout, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.SubclassWndProc(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
   at MS.Win32.UnsafeNativeMethods.DispatchMessage(MSG& msg)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.PushFrameImpl(DispatcherFrame frame)
   at System.Windows.Application.RunInternal(Window window)
   at System.Windows.Application.Run()
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don't know the answer, but suggest that you keep observing. if the problem is really random,then it might be a bug of .net 4.0. otherwise it's not –  Peter Long Jun 17 '11 at 1:11
    
We had the same problem, went away when I removed some of the styling. When we find out exactly what part caused it, I'll write it here. –  sinelaw Aug 17 '11 at 14:51
    
Ok, in our case it had to do with a storyboard animation in the style of a datetime picker's calendar. We still didn't investigate the exact cause, but we'll remove the animations as it solves it. –  sinelaw Aug 17 '11 at 15:19
2  
Update: Turns out the animation probably wasn't the exact reason. Someone put in a global style on Buttons. As a result of that, the DateTimePicker style got screwed. The "fix" they put in was to override the DateTimePicker style with a whole heap of xaml code, probably copied from some website. The style was horribly complicated. When I removed the complicated custom DateTimePicker style, the exception went away. I also removed the global Button style override which made the DateTimePicker look normal again. So by just removing a whole bunch of XAML style code, I prevented the exception. –  sinelaw Aug 18 '11 at 23:35
    
BTW, it's still a WPF bug, just for the record. Just telling how I avoided it. –  sinelaw Aug 18 '11 at 23:36

3 Answers 3

This is WPF bug. CalendarAutomationPeer.GetChildrenCore returns nulls if there isn't a data template defined for Day Title row (the part of the calendar that shows the name of the days). This causes null pointer exceptions that usually get handled somewhere in WPF but sometimes cause an application to crash.

In order to solve this simply define DayTitleTemplate (as mentioned in comment by Friggers and in this post How can I change the DataTemplate for DayTitleTemplate in a CalendarItemTemplate).

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I had a similar problem and the following thread helped me: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/ar/wpf/thread/0ee9954d-0df5-4d61-8dc9-eb50c7a5be99.

Change the DataTemplate from "DayTitleTemplate" to "{x:Static CalendarItem.DayTitleTemplateResourceKey}"

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The EnsureChildren method is fairly simple:

private void EnsureChildren()
{
    if (!this._childrenValid || this._ancestorsInvalid)
    {
        this._children = this.GetChildrenCore();
        if (this._children != null)
        {
            int count = this._children.Count;
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                this._children[i]._parent = this;
                this._children[i]._index = i;
                this._children[i]._hwnd = this._hwnd;
            }
        }
        this._childrenValid = true;
    }
}

The only chance for a NullReferenceException is with the this.children[i] code. The GetChildrenCore is usually implemented by the automation peers for custom WPF controls. So chances are one of those is return null in the collection returned from GetChildrenCore.

If you have any custom controls or any third party controls that implement a custom automation peer, then that would be a likely suspect.

You can disable UI automation on an element-by-element basis by create a custom class and overriding OnCreateAutomationPeer and returning null. That's the only way I know to disable automation.

Your best bet would probably be to remove various elements of your UI to narrow down which control is causing the issue.

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Thanks! Well I have the source code for all the custom controls etc. Nothing seems to be implementing a custom automation peer. I will try override the OnCreateAutomationPeer for all the Windows in the project. –  Luke Jun 17 '11 at 1:58

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