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EDIT: Passed Expression exp and string expression by const reference

I'm trying to allow a class to be display via cout in the following manner:

#include <iostream>

class Expression {
private:
    std::string expression;
public:
    Expression(const std::string& expression):
        expression(expression) { }
    friend std::ostream& operator <<(ostream& os, const Expression& exp) {
        return os << exp.expression; }
};

however, on compiling I get the errors:

main.cpp(9) : error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'ostream'
main.cpp(9) : error C2809: 'operator <<' has no formal parameters

this is especially confusing because VC++ is giving me ostream as an autocompletion suggestion when I enter std::. What's causing these errors, and how can they be resolved?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Surely you need std::ostream in all locations? i.e.:

friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, Expression& exp) ...
                                 ^^^
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I've tried. It didn't solve anything, so I put back in iostream because I was using cin and cout elsewhere in the code, and including both was redundant. EDIT - err, didn't see the second line. Yeah, in retrospect, this was kind of a stupid question. –  user98188 Jun 17 '11 at 1:20
1  
Indeed. The hint is in the error message. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 17 '11 at 1:20
    
@Keand64: "It didn't solve anything" It's required. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 17 '11 at 1:21
    
@Keand64: Looks like the answer to me, buddy. Also I took the liberty of fixing your ctor parameter. Don't accept std::string by value. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 17 '11 at 1:22
    
And your operator<< should take exp by const-reference, not just by reference. –  ildjarn Jun 17 '11 at 1:30

Without a using namespace std; clause (which has its own set of problems), you need to fully qualify all the iostream stuff.

You can see this with the following program:

#include <iostream>

class Expression {
private:
    std::string expression;
public:
    Expression(std::string expression):
        expression(expression) { }
    //                                  added this bit.
    //                                _/_
    //                               /   \
    friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, Expression& exp) {
        return os << exp.expression; }
};

int main (void) {
    Expression e ("Hi, I'm Pax.");
    std::cout << e << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

which prints out:

Hi, I'm Pax.

as expected.


And, as some comments have pointed out, you should pass the string as const-reference:

#include <iostream>

class Expression {
private:
    std::string expression;
public:
    Expression(const std::string& expression)
    : expression(expression) {
    }
    friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const Expression& exp) {
        return os << exp.expression;
    }
};

int main (void) {
    Expression e ("Hi, I'm Pax.");
    std::cout << e << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
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