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Code that not affecting the collection needs Mutual Exclusion

    List<string> _itemColection = new List<string>();
    object _criticalSection = new object();

    private void Add(string item)
    {
        lock (_criticalSection)
        {
            _itemColection.Add(item);
        }
    }

    private void Remove(string item)
    {
        lock (_criticalSection)
        {
            _itemColection.Remove(item);
        }
    }

    private void GetCount()
    {
        ///Is it lock is reuired here?
        return _itemColection.Count;
    }

    //Thread method
    private void Run()
    {
        lock (_criticalSection)
        {

            foreach (string item in _itemColection)
            {
                ///Some operation
            }
        }
    }

Is it Mutex is required in GetCount() method. The collection value's are not changed

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you should lock there. You're requesting access to shared data, and if you don't have some sort of memory barrier there'll be no guarantee that it'll be "fresh" information. The memory model can be a real mind-bender sometimes :)

In addition, while I'd expect List<T>.Count to be a pretty simple operation, it could theoretically be complicated - and if another thread is mutating stuff (e.g. adding an item, which then requires a buffer expansion) while it's working out the count, you could theoretically run into trouble.

Basically, unless a type claims to be thread-safe for your particular scenario, I'd always make sure you don't perform two operations on it at the same time.

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In practise its probably not needed, but I would include it myself to be on the safe side. _itemCollection.Count is a property, so effectively you are calling a function on the collection, and you have no guarantee what this function is doing.

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Simple answer is yes because the values might get changed and you won't have up-to-date data.

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That's an excelent question about concurency..

In my opinion it's always necessary to use lock when you are in presence of some concurrency.

EDIT

We just use lock in operations that need to change some information, and never need to use that in read-only objects.

Best regards

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Unless you know that your types involved are threadsafe for your operations - e.g. strings, or just reading on a dictionary which is set up statically once and never changed. –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '09 at 11:05
    
Exactly... that's seems obvious to me. I think that we just use lock in operations that need to change some information. I forgot to say that on my answer. –  rpf Mar 12 '09 at 12:58
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