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EDIT: so this is what im rockin now: the dialog and the array display just fine, i just want to be able to set the static variable from the originating class within the onClick that is in a method that is in a different class. easy right? all of the try, catch and <?> were things that i put in at the insistence of the complier.

public class Setter
    {
    public void myList(Context context, Class<?> thisclass, int arrayid, String choice)
        {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(context)
        .setItems(arrayid, new OnClickListener()
            {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
                {
                setChoice(thisclass, context, arrayid, which, choice);
                }
            })
        .create();
        }           
    public void setChoice(Class<?> thisclass, Context context, int arrayid, int which, String choice)
        {
        String[] array = context.getResources().getStringArray(arrayid);
        try
            {
            Field f = thisclass.getDeclaredField(choice);
            f.set(null, array[which]);
            }
        catch (SecurityException e)
            {
            e.printStackTrace();
            }
        catch (NoSuchFieldException e)
            {
            e.printStackTrace();
            }
        catch (IllegalArgumentException e)
            {
            e.printStackTrace();
            }
        catch (IllegalAccessException e)
            {
            e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

public class ClassA extends Activity
    {
    static String stringa;
    Setter setted = new Setter();
    ...
    public void onCreate()
        {
        super.onCreate();
        ...
        AlertDialog thinga = setted.myList(this, getclass(), R.array.thinga, stringa).show();
        ...
        }
    }

when i select an item from the list, i get this from debugger:

ClassCache.findFieldByName(Field[], String) line: 438   
Class.getDeclaredField(String) line: 666    
Setter.setChoice(Class, Context, int, int, String) line: 45 // the line with the Field

i think im passing it the class wrong but this is a bit out of my current depth.

i have a number of different classes each with their own static Strings. i am passing the method below the name of the String (in choice) and the context of what i had hoped was the original class that called a method that called a method that led to the code below. i was hoping i could call context.choice = something and the machine would read that as ClassA.stringa = something; how do i do that?

briefly, i want to have a list of items that the user can choose from be the content of a dialog, and have their selection be saved and accessible to the class that called for the creation of the dialog. perhaps im going about this all wrong but i got tired of dealing with other 'kludges' involving using spinners to do the same thing.

because onClick can't have non-final objects declared elsewhere (at least that is my understanding) i thought maybe i could get around that by calling to another method, setChoice that would store the value of whatever was chosen. i would definitively say this is a kludge and would love to be shown the light as to how you are supposed to deal with these things.

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1  
To me, your code has a funny smell and looks to be a possible kludge. Why not use OOP techniques, create an interface and call the appropriate interface method using the power of polymorphism? Also, why the static variable? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 17 '11 at 4:33
1  
@Hovercraft, the fact that he's actually setting a variable of the caller in the called method, makes it worse than a smell. stringa=polka; would have been sufficient instead of setted.setChoice(this, stringa, polka);. Somehow he's trying to abstract away an assignment statement. –  Vineet Reynolds Jun 17 '11 at 4:41
    
@Hovercraft, best name ive seen on here yet. you could be completely right and i hope someone will include that as one of the answers, if not ill have to read up on interfaces. @Vineet, I said it was an extreme simplification. i have updated the bottom of the question with what i am trying to do in general and what i was trying to use this specific code for. –  dylan murphy Jun 17 '11 at 13:09
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Java does not have closures, but you can get close with anonymous inner classes.

String output;
public void onCreate() {
    Setter.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            output  = "selected";
        }
    });
}

See also this swing tutorial: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/events/actionlistener.html

Edit: In spirit of your example, this should look like this:

public class Setter
{
public void setChoice(IsetString setter, String something)
    {
    setter.setString(something);
    }
}


class ClassA extends Activity implements setString
{
static String stringa;
string polka = "dots";
Setter setted = new Setter();
...
public void onCreate()
    {
    super.onCreate();
    ...
    setted.setChoice(new IsetString() {

        @Override
        public void setString(String s) {
            stringa = s;
        }
    }, polka);
    ...
    }
}

interface IsetString {
    void setString(String s);
}
share|improve this answer
    
hrm i will look into this more when i get off work, i might have skimmed the chapter on interfaces ... –  dylan murphy Jun 17 '11 at 13:41
    
i am still not entirely clear what this answer does for me, forgive my ignorance. also, see the edits above, i think its a lot more obvious what i was going for now. –  dylan murphy Jun 17 '11 at 19:46
    
I do not understand what you try to do at all. Basically it looks like you want to use reflection to do something that shouldn't be done with reflection. Also, your question is so polluted with a half baked attempt to use reflection that i can't even filter out the real question anymore. You use a Context i do not understand since you pass ClassA extends Activity into it, you get a array from Context that's not there either. I suppose you want to set a certain value to a certain variable, but i can't figure out where it comes from and where it should go. –  Dorus Jun 17 '11 at 21:50
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The short answer - use the Reflection API.

The long answer - you'll need to obtain access to the Fields of the desired Context Class. Once you gain access to the Field instances, you can set their values using the set() method; the API call is a bit tricky in that you'll need to pass in the object reference (the context object and not the context class) whose field you wish to modify.

It is necessary that your Context, choice and something parameters to the method, contain the necessary information to make this operation as simple as possible. In other words, the Context class might have to contain the actual Class object (or provides a way to get one) that contains the field.

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i took a stab in the dark at using Field ... and the results were pretty much what you would expect. see edits. –  dylan murphy Jun 17 '11 at 19:44
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You can use reflection for that. Suppose you context is class itself

public void setChoice(Class<?> context, String choice, String something)
{
   try {
     Field f = context.getDeclaredField(choice);
     f.set(null, something);
   } catch (....) {
   }
}

Add proper exception handling


Note that first argument to set is null. That is only valid for static methods. So you may want to check that method is static using f.getModifiers().

share|improve this answer
    
You might want to state why the first arg in the call f.set(null, something); is null. For an instance member, that will result in a NullPointerException. –  Vineet Reynolds Jun 17 '11 at 4:45
    
@Veenit Good point. I updated the answer. –  Alex Gitelman Jun 17 '11 at 5:06
    
yours seems to be the simplest solution except when I try to pass a Class object, i get this message: "Class is a raw type. References to generic type Class<T> should be parameterized" with the only suggestions being "Infer Generic Type Arguments" or "add suppress warnings" could i get some more help please? –  dylan murphy Jun 17 '11 at 18:15
    
Class<?> should work. In any case, it's just a warning that does not stop compilation. I updated the answer in that respect. –  Alex Gitelman Jun 17 '11 at 20:07
    
hrm ok, that seems to be what i tried to do in my question (i updated it to reflect code that i added to try and implement what you suggested) am i getting the class wrong maybe? –  dylan murphy Jun 18 '11 at 5:54
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