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Consider a function which returns two values. We can write:

// Using out:
string MyFunction(string input, out int count)

// Using Tuple class:
Tuple<string, int> MyFunction(string input)

// Using struct:
MyStruct MyFunction(string input)

Which one is best practice and why?

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String is not a value type. I think you meant to say "consider a function which returns two values". –  Eric Lippert Jun 17 '11 at 6:04
    
@Eric: You right. I meant immutable types. –  Xaqron Jun 17 '11 at 6:07
    
and what's wrong with a class? –  lukas Jun 17 '11 at 6:22
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@lukas: Nothing, but surely it is not in best practices. This is a lightweight value (< 16 KB) and if I gonna adding a custom code, I'll go with struct as Eric mentioned. –  Xaqron Jun 17 '11 at 6:28
    
Its a little more wordy but in your case i think a KeyValuePair would be a better choice than Tuple –  MikeT Oct 30 '13 at 15:41
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4 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted

They each have their pros and cons.

Out parameters are fast and cheap but require that you pass in a variable, and rely upon mutation. It is almost impossible to correctly use an out parameter with LINQ.

Tuples make collection pressure and are un-self-documenting. "Item1" is not very descriptive.

Custom structs can be slow to copy if they are large, but are self-documenting and are efficient if they are small. However it is also a pain to define a whole bunch of custom structs for trivial uses.

I would be inclined to the custom struct solution all other things being equal. Even better though is to make a function that only returns one value. Why are you returning two values in the first place?

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Returning two values is often a substitute for not having option types or ADT. –  Anton Tykhyy Jun 17 '11 at 6:17
    
@Eric: This is about a LoadBalancer which returns the appropriate server address (string url) and the time this server address is valid (int minutes). Do you think something is wrong with design? (Note: Currently I use out keyword) –  Xaqron Jun 17 '11 at 6:20
    
Eric, this one question has been bugging me for a while, are there any good use cases for Tuple type? –  SolutionYogi Jun 17 '11 at 6:20
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@Xaqron: If you find that the idea of "data with a timeout" is common in your program then you might consider making a generic type "TimeLimited<T>" so that you can have your method return a TimeLimited<string> or TimeLimited<Uri> or whatever. The TimeLimited<T> class can then have helper methods that tell you "how long have we got left?" or "is it expired?" or whatever. Try to capture interesting semantics like this in the type system. –  Eric Lippert Jun 17 '11 at 15:06
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Absolutely, I would never use Tuple as part of public interface. But even for the 'private' code, I get enormous readability from a proper type instead of using Tuple (especially how easy it is to create a private inner type with Auto Properties). –  SolutionYogi Jun 17 '11 at 15:11
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There is no "best practice". It is what you are comfortable with and what works best in your situation. As long as you are consistent with this, there is no problem with any of the solutions you've posted.

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Of course they all work. In case there's no technical advantage, I'm still curious to know what is mostly used by experts. –  Xaqron Jun 17 '11 at 6:10
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I think the answer depends on the semantics of what the function is doing, and the relationship between the two values.

For example, the TryParse methods take a out parameter to accept the parsed value, and return a bool to indicate whether or not the parse succeeded. The two values don't really belong together, so, semantically, it makes more sense, and the intent of the code is easier to read, to use the out parameter.

If, however, your function returns X/Y coordinates of some object on the screen, then the two values semantically belong together and it would be better to use a struct.

I'd personally avoid using a tuple for anything that will be visible to external code becuase of the awkward syntax for retrieving the members.

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+1 for semantics. Your answer is more appropriate whit reference types when we can leave the out parameter null. There are a few nullable immutable types out there. –  Xaqron Jun 17 '11 at 6:50
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Actually, the two values in TryParse do very much belong together, far moreso than implied by having one as a return value and the other as a ByRef parameter. In many ways, the logical thing to return would be a nullable type. There are some cases where the TryParse pattern works nicely, and some where it's a pain (it's nice that it can be used in an "if" statement, but there are many cases where returning a nullable value or being able to specify a default value would be more convenient). –  supercat Jun 20 '11 at 17:24
    
@supercat i would agree with andrew, they don't belong together. though they are related the return tells you if you need to bother with the value at all not something that needs to be processed in tandem. so after you have processed the return its no longer required for any other processing relating to the out value, this is diferent than say returning a KeyValuePair from a dictionary where there is a clear and on going link between the key and the value. though i agree if nullable types have been in .Net 1.1 they probably would have used them as null would be a proper way to flag no value –  MikeT Oct 30 '13 at 15:57
    
@MikeT: I consider it exceptionally unfortunate that Microsoft has suggested that structures should only be used for things representing a single value, when in fact an exposed-field structure is the ideal medium for passing together a group of independent variables bound together with duct tape. The success indicator and the value are meaningful together at the moment they are returned, even if after that they would be more useful as separate variables. Fields of an exposed-field structure stored in a variable are themselves usable as separate variables. In any case... –  supercat Oct 30 '13 at 16:20
    
@MikeT: Because of the ways covariance is and is not supported within the framework, the only try pattern which works with covariant interfaces is T TryGetValue(whatever, out bool success); that approach would have allowed interfaces IReadableMap<in TKey, out TValue> : IReadableMap<out TValue>, and let code which wants to map instances of Animal to instances of Car to accept a Dictionary<Cat, ToyotaCar> [using TryGetValue<TKey>(TKey key, out bool success). No such variance is possible if TValue is used as a ref parameter. –  supercat Oct 30 '13 at 16:26
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I will go with the approach of using Out parameter because in second approach you would require to create and object of Tuple class and then add value to it, which I think is an costly operation compared to returning the value in out parameter. Though if you want to return multiple values in Tuple Class (which infact can not be accomplished by just returning one out parameter) then I will go for second approach.

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I agree with out. Additionally there's a params keyword I did not mentioned to keep the question straight. –  Xaqron Jun 17 '11 at 6:12
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