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I want to build a tree with the following characteristics:

  1. Every node can have 1 "next node".
  2. Every node can have multiple child nodes.
  3. The number of child nodes can vary from one node to the other

I was thinking of a struct which looked like this:

struct tree {
  int value;
  struct tree* nextnode;
  struct tree** childnode;
};

The number of children at each node has to be parametrized. I am not sure how to do this. Thanks in advance!

Edit: Let me try to define it using an example: Let us take the starting node. Now, I will define at compile time that there will be 3 NextNodes and each of these NextNodes will have 2 ChildNodes. This is at Depth=0. At Depth = 1 (i.e. for each child node from Depth=0) I specify that there will be 4 NextNodes and for each of these NextNodes there will be 3 ChildNodes and so on. Hope I am able to convey it properly. Please do ask if I am not clear somewhere.

Edit2: Here is a pic:

Here is a pic

share|improve this question
    
You data structure looks fine; it isn't clear what the question is. – servn Jun 17 '11 at 7:24
    
Friendly tip: If this is homework, remember to tag it as such! – csl Jun 17 '11 at 7:24
    
This should be your answer codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/569/…;. See the code which is in question. And codegolf.stackexchange.com/questions/339/binary-tree-encoding. – Pankaj Kumar Jun 17 '11 at 7:42
    
If the problem is how to allocate memory dynamically to accommodate for a varying number of children, I would strongly suggest using STL containers plus smart pointers rather than raw pointers. – Kerrek SB Jun 17 '11 at 7:53
    
You should state more of the problem to solve, rather than the problems with your solution. What are the requirements? What does the nextnode pointer represent? It is usual to implement trees with unknown number of children per node with a single first_child pointer in the parent and a next_node (or next_sibling) list that forms the list of children, but in that case, childNode should be struct tree* childNode; (to represent the pointer to the first child, from which to start iterating over childnode->nextnode for the rest of the siblings). Is that what you intended? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 17 '11 at 7:54

This is a N-ary tree. I suggest you of split in Tree and Node

typedef struct tree tree;
typdef struct node node;

struct tree {
    node * root;
};

struct node {
    int value;
    node * next_node;
};

now you can perform all the operation of the tree structure

here an example

node * add_child(node *parent, int child_value){
    node * chld = malloc(sizeof(node));
    chld->value = child_value;
    if(parent->next == NULL)
        parent->next = chld;
    else{
        node * tmp = parent->next;
        while(tmp->next != NULL)
            tmp = tmp->next;
        tmp->next = chld;
    }
    return chld;
}
share|improve this answer

You could use Boost.Graph library.

Very complicated at first, but provide efficient data storage and highly optimized graph algorithm implementations.

From the site:

Algorithms

The BGL algorithms consist of a core set of algorithm patterns (implemented as generic algorithms) and a larger set of graph algorithms. The core algorithm patterns are

  • Breadth First Search
  • Depth First Search
  • Uniform Cost Search

By themselves, the algorithm patterns do not compute any meaningful quantities over graphs; they are merely building blocks for constructing graph algorithms. The graph algorithms in the BGL currently include

  • Dijkstra's Shortest Paths
  • Bellman-Ford Shortest Paths
  • Johnson's All-Pairs Shortest Paths
  • Kruskal's Minimum Spanning Tree
  • Prim's Minimum Spanning Tree
  • Connected Components
  • Strongly Connected Components
  • Dynamic Connected Components (using Disjoint Sets)
  • Topological Sort Transpose
  • Reverse Cuthill Mckee Ordering
  • Smallest Last Vertex Ordering
  • Sequential Vertex Coloring

Data Structures

The BGL currently provides two graph classes and an edge list adaptor:

  • adjacency_list
  • adjacency_matrix
  • edge_list

The adjacency_list class is the general purpose “swiss army knife” of graph classes. It is highly parameterized so that it can be optimized for different situations: the graph is directed or undirected, allow or disallow parallel edges, efficient access to just the out-edges or also to the in-edges, fast vertex insertion and removal at the cost of extra space overhead, etc.

The adjacency_matrix class stores edges in a |V| x |V| matrix (where |V| is the number of vertices). The elements of this matrix represent edges in the graph. Adjacency matrix representations are especially suitable for very dense graphs, i.e., those where the number of edges approaches |V|2.

The edge_list class is an adaptor that takes any kind of edge iterator and implements an Edge List Graph.

share|improve this answer

The biggest issue you are having here is unclear requirements: "The number of children at each node has to be parametrized" especially in combination with "The number of child nodes can vary from one node to the other".

Try to find out exactly what this means and it shouldn't be that hard to implement it. As it stands now, I wouldn't know how to do it eather, because I don't know what has to be done: do you need to store the number of nodes, do you need to have a maximum of nodes possible, does the maximum has to be known on compile time,...?


Edit based on the example: I'm not sure of the next-node because you say there are 3 next-nodes but the requirements state that there is 1 next-node per node (as you show in your tree-struct).

If you need to parametrize the number of nodes based on the depth, then you probably need to store your depth, or pass it as a parameter and make a fixed array of nodes per depth that you consult when creating the child nodes.
Then you need to know what to do when the depth exceeds the array (stop your tree or use a default number of nodes)

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. Let me try to define it using an example: Let us take the starting node. Now, I will define at compile time that there will be 3 NextNodes and each of these NextNodes will have 2 ChildNodes. This is at Depth=0. At Depth = 1 (i.e. for each child node from Depth=0) I specify that there will be 4 NextNodes and for each of these NextNodes there will be 3 ChildNodes and so on. Hope I am able to convey it properly. Please do ask if I am not clear somewhere. – user560913 Jun 17 '11 at 8:14

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