Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a python equivalent function similar to normplot from MATLAB? Perhaps in matplotlib?

MATLAB syntax:

x = normrnd(10,1,25,1);
normplot(x)

Gives:

enter image description here

I have tried using matplotlib & numpy module to determine the probability/percentile of the values in array but the output plot y-axis scales are linear as compared to the plot from MATLAB.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data =[-11.83,-8.53,-2.86,-6.49,-7.53,-9.74,-9.44,-3.58,-6.68,-13.26,-4.52]
plot_percentiles = range(0, 110, 10) 

x = np.percentile(data, plot_percentiles)
plt.plot(x, plot_percentiles, 'ro-')
plt.xlabel('Value')
plt.ylabel('Probability')  
plt.show() 

Gives: enter image description here

Else, how could the scales be adjusted as in the first plot?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

I'm fairly certain matplotlib doesn't provide anything like this.

It's possible to do, of course, but you'll have to either rescale your data and change your y axis ticks/labels to match, or, if you're planning on doing this often, perhaps code a new scale that can be applied to matplotlib axes, like in this example: http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/examples/api/custom_scale_example.html.

share|improve this answer

Maybe you can use the probplot function of scipy (scipy.stats), this seems to me an equivalent for MATLABs normplot:

Calculate quantiles for a probability plot of sample data against a specified theoretical distribution.

probplot optionally calculates a best-fit line for the data and plots the results using Matplotlib or a given plot function.

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/scipy.stats.probplot.html

But is does not solve your problem of the different y-axis scale.

share|improve this answer

Using matplotlib.semilogy will get closer to the matlab output.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.