Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I statically link the intel's TBB libraries to my application? I know all the caveats such as unfair load distribution of the scheduler, but I don't need the scheduler, just the containers, so it's ok.

Anyways I know this can be done, although its undocumented, however I just can't seem to find the way to do it right now (although I've seen it before somewhere).

So does anyone know or have any clues?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
any platform really, both windows, Linux, plus solaris. I need to know what extra defines to add for proper compilation. –  Robert Gould Mar 16 '09 at 0:08
add comment

4 Answers

Unfortunately it does not appear to be possible: From TBB site..
One suggestion on the Intel forum was to compile it manually if you really need the static linkage: From Intel Forum.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is strongly not recommended:

Is there a version of TBB that provides statically linked libraries?

TBB is not provided as a statically linked library, for the following reasons*:

Most libraries operate locally. For example, an Intel(R) MKL FFT transforms an array. It is irrelevant how many copies of the FFT there are. Multiple copies and versions can coexist without difficulty. But some libraries control program-wide resources, such as memory and processors. For example, garbage collectors control memory allocation across a program. Analogously, TBB controls scheduling of tasks across a program. To do their job effectively, each of these must be a singleton; that is, have a sole instance that can coordinate activities across the entire program. Allowing k instances of the TBB scheduler in a single program would cause there to be k times as many software threads as hardware threads. The program would operate inefficiently, because the machine would be oversubscribed by a factor of k, causing more context switching, cache contention, and memory consumption. Furthermore, TBB's efficient support for nested parallelism would be negated when nested parallelism arose from nested invocations of distinct schedulers.

The most practical solution for creating a program-wide singleton is a dynamic shared library that contains the singleton. Of course if the schedulers could cooperate, we would not need a singleton. But that cooperation requires a centralized agent to communicate through; that is, a singleton!

Our decision to omit a statically linkable version of TBB was strongly influenced by our OpenMP experience. Like TBB, OpenMP also tries to schedule across a program. A static version of the OpenMP run-time was once provided, and it has been a constant source of problems arising from duplicate schedulers. We think it best not to repeat that history. As an indirect proof of the validity of these considerations, we could point to the fact that Microsoft Visual C++ only provides OpenMP support via dynamic libraries.

Source: http://www.threadingbuildingblocks.org/faq/11#sthash.t3BrizFQ.dpuf

share|improve this answer
add comment

Just link the files, I just did it and works. Here's the SConscript file. There's two minor things, a symbol which has the same name in tbb and tbbmalloc which I had to prevent to be multiply defined, and I prevented the usage of ITT_NOTIFY since it creates another symbol with the same name in both libs.

Import('g_CONFIGURATION')
import os
import SCutils
import utils

tbb_basedir = os.path.join(
    g_CONFIGURATION['basedir'],
    '3rd-party/tbb40_233oss/')

#print 'TBB base:', tbb_basedir
#print 'CWD: ', os.getcwd()

ccflags = []
cxxflags = [
    '-m64',
    '-march=native',
    '-I{0}'.format(tbb_basedir),
    '-I{0}'.format(os.path.join(tbb_basedir, 'src')),
    #'-I{0}'.format(os.path.join(tbb_basedir, 'src/tbb')),
    '-I{0}'.format(os.path.join(tbb_basedir, 'src/rml/include')),
    '-I{0}'.format(os.path.join(tbb_basedir, 'include')),
]
cppdefines = [
#    'DO_ITT_NOTIFY',
    'USE_PTHREAD',
    '__TBB_BUILD=1',
]
linkflags = []

if g_CONFIGURATION['build'] == 'debug':
    ccflags.extend([
        '-O0',
        '-g',
        '-ggdb2',
    ])
    cppdefines.extend([
        'TBB_USE_DEBUG',
    ])

else:
    ccflags.extend([
        '-O2',
    ])


tbbenv = Environment(
    platform = 'posix',
    CCFLAGS=ccflags,
    CXXFLAGS=cxxflags,
    CPPDEFINES=cppdefines,
    LINKFLAGS=linkflags
)

############################################################################
# Build verbosity
if not SCutils.has_option('verbose'):
    SCutils.setup_quiet_build(tbbenv, True if SCutils.has_option('colorblind') else False)
############################################################################



tbbmallocenv = tbbenv.Clone()

tbbmallocenv.Append(CCFLAGS=[
    '-fno-rtti',
    '-fno-exceptions',
    '-fno-schedule-insns2',
])

#tbbenv.Command('version_string.tmp', None, '')

# Write version_string.tmp
with open(os.path.join(os.getcwd(), 'version_string.tmp'), 'wb') as fd:
    (out, err, ret) = utils.xcall([
        '/bin/bash',
        os.path.join(g_CONFIGURATION['basedir'], '3rd-party/tbb40_233oss/build/version_info_linux.sh')
    ])

    if ret:
        raise SCons.Errors.StopError('version_info_linux.sh execution failed')

    fd.write(out);
    #print 'put version_string in', os.path.join(os.getcwd(), 'version_string.tmp')
    #print out
    fd.close()

result = []

def setup_tbb():
    print 'CWD: ', os.getcwd()
    tbb_sources = SCutils.find_files(os.path.join(tbb_basedir,'src/tbb'), r'^.*\.cpp$')
    tbb_sources.extend([
        'src/tbbmalloc/frontend.cpp',
        'src/tbbmalloc/backref.cpp',
        'src/tbbmalloc/tbbmalloc.cpp',
        'src/tbbmalloc/large_objects.cpp',
        'src/tbbmalloc/backend.cpp',
        'src/rml/client/rml_tbb.cpp',
    ])


    print tbb_sources
    result.append(tbbenv.StaticLibrary(target='libtbb', source=tbb_sources))


setup_tbb()

Return('result')
share|improve this answer
add comment

Using the opensource version:

After running "make tbb",go to the build/linux_xxxxxxxx_release folder.

Then run:

ar -r libtbb.a concurrent_hash_map.o concurrent_queue.o concurrent_vector.o 
dynamic_link.o itt_notify.o cache_aligned_allocator.o pipeline.o queuing_mutex.o 
queuing_rw_mutex.o reader_writer_lock.o spin_rw_mutex.o spin_mutex.o critical_section.o
task.o tbb_misc.o tbb_misc_ex.o mutex.o recursive_mutex.o condition_variable.o 
tbb_thread.o concurrent_monitor.o semaphore.o private_server.o rml_tbb.o 
task_group_context.o governor.o market.o arena.o scheduler.o observer_proxy.o 
tbb_statistics.o tbb_main.o concurrent_vector_v2.o concurrent_queue_v2.o 
spin_rw_mutex_v2.o task_v2.o

And you should get libtbb.a as output.

Note that your program should build both with "-ldl" and libtbb.a

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.