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I'm currently playing with mixin layers designs, and I'm stuck with an annoying problem. Let's consider the following basic mixin layer:

template <typename Next> 
struct Layer1 : public Next 
{ 
 struct A : public Next::A 
 { 
   void f() { g(); } 
   void g() {} 
 }; 
};

Nothing fancy here, just a simple mixin with 2 methods f() and g(). Notice that the g() call from f() is is statically binded to this specific Layer1::A::g(). Now, what I want is to be able to completely hook the methods of this mixin to implement, say, a logging layer:

template <typename Next> 
struct Layer2 : public Next 
{ 
 struct A : public Next::A 
 { 
   void f() 
   { 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::f() [enter]" << std::endl; 
     Next::A::f(); 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::f() [leave]" << std::endl; 
   } 
   void g() 
   { 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::g() [enter]" << std::endl; 
     Next::A::g(); 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::g() [leave]" << std::endl; 
   } 
 }; 
};

Considering Layer2<Layer1<...>>, the problem here is that any call of f() and g() from a layer above Layer2 will properly cascade down to the Layer2::A::g(), and thus display the proper logging messages. But any call of f() and g() from below Layer2 will not log anything since the call would have been statically binded to the g() available at the time the call was made. This means that calling f() from any layer above Layer2 will obviously still always call Layer1::A::g() from Layer1::A::f() and not display the logging messages. I came up with 2 solutions to this problem:

  1. Virtuality: clearly not acceptable. The whole point of mixin layers is to avoid virtuality when not necessary.

  2. Adding a template parameter to the layers to provide the previous layer, something of the kind.

.

template <typename Next, template <typename> class Prev> 
struct Layer2 : public Next 
{ 
 typedef Next next_t; 
 struct A : public Next::A 
 { 
   void f() 
   { 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::f() [enter]" << std::endl; 
     Next::A::f(); 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::f() [leave]" << std::endl; 
   } 
   void g() 
   { 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::g() [enter]" << std::endl; 
     Next::A::g(); 
     std::cout << "Layer2::A::g() [leave]" << std::endl; 
   } 
 }; 
}; 

template <typename Next, template <typename> class Prev> 
struct Layer1 : public Next 
{ 
 typedef Next next_t; 
 struct A : public Next::A 
 { 
   void f() 
   { 
     std::cout << "Layer1::A::f() [enter]" << std::endl; 
     ((typename Prev<Layer1<Next,Prev> >::A*)this)->g(); 
     std::cout << "Layer1::A::f() [leave]" << std::endl; 
   } 
   void g() 
   { 
     std::cout << "Layer1::A::g() [enter]" << std::endl; 
     std::cout << "Layer1::A::g() [leave]" << std::endl; 
   } 
 }; 
}; 

typedef Layer2<Layer1<Layer0,Layer2>,NullType> Application;

Well, it works, but I would like to hide this second template parameter since it is redundant. I wondered if any of you ever encountered such problem, and what solutions did you developped to solve it, since there is a clear lack of articles on mixin layers.

share|improve this question
    
This is a typical use of CRTP. You want static binding to the outermost template and I see no way to pass it implicitly. It does have an impact on reusability: If I want to add a third layer, I cannot inherit from your layer, because I have to change the outermost layer. –  Matthieu M. Jun 17 '11 at 9:53
    
For those who don't know what is all about "mixin layer". You should edit your question in black box format. i.e what is your input and what is the desired output. That will truly help making it clear that what you actually want. –  iammilind Jun 17 '11 at 11:12

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