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I was wondering how, if possible, I can create a simple job management in BASH to process several commands in parallel. That is, I have a big list of commands to run, and I'd like to have two of them running at any given time.

I know quite a bit about bash, so here are the requirements that make it tricky:

  • The commands have variable running time so I can't just spawn 2, wait, and then continue with the next two. As soon as one command is done a next command must be run.
  • The controlling process needs to know the exit code of each command so that it can keep a total of how many failed

I'm thinking somehow I can use trap but I don't see an easy way to get the exit value of a child inside the handler.

So, any ideas on how this can be done?


Well, here is some proof of concept code that should probably work, but it breaks bash: invalid command lines generated, hanging, and sometimes a core dump.

# need monitor mode for trap CHLD to work
set -m
# store the PIDs of the children being watched
declare -a child_pids

function child_done
{
    echo "Child $1 result = $2"
}

function check_pid
{
    # check if running
    kill -s 0 $1
    if [ $? == 0 ]; then
        child_pids=("${child_pids[@]}" "$1")
    else
        wait $1
        ret=$?
        child_done $1 $ret
    fi
}

# check by copying pids, clearing list and then checking each, check_pid
# will add back to the list if it is still running
function check_done
{
    to_check=("${child_pids[@]}")
    child_pids=()

    for ((i=0;$i<${#to_check};i++)); do
        check_pid ${to_check[$i]}
    done
}

function run_command
{
    "$@" &
    pid=$!
    # check this pid now (this will add to the child_pids list if still running)
    check_pid $pid
}

# run check on all pids anytime some child exits
trap 'check_done' CHLD

# test
for ((tl=0;tl<10;tl++)); do
    run_command bash -c "echo FAIL; sleep 1; exit 1;"
    run_command bash -c "echo OKAY;"
done

# wait for all children to be done
wait

Note that this isn't what I ultimately want, but would be groundwork to getting what I want.


Followup: I've implemented a system to do this in Python. So anybody using Python for scripting can have the above functionality. Refer to shelljob

share|improve this question
    
You can use the shell's builtin 'wait' command to reap each child and get its exit status, but you need to wait for a specific pid, otherwise it will not return until all children have exited. You don't want to wait in the signal handler though. This is tricky in bash, much easier to do it in C honestly. –  chrisdowney Jun 17 '11 at 10:11
    
Well, if I could get the PID in the signal handler I think I'd be fine, but I don't see anyway to get the PID. I know it can be easily done in other languages, but I'm trying to make an extension to a bash script. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 17 '11 at 10:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

GNU Parallel is awesomesauce:

$ parallel -j2 < commands.txt
$ echo $?

It will set the exit status to the number of commands that failed. If you have more than 253 commands, check out --joblog. If you don't know all the commands up front, check out --bg.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks very much for the reference. This command seems great. I'll see if I can adapt my script. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 27 '11 at 21:34

Can I persuade you to use make? This has the advantage that you can tell it how many commands to run in parallel (modify the -j number)

echo -e ".PHONY: c1 c2 c3 c4\nall: c1 c2 c3 c4\nc1:\n\tsleep 2; echo c1\nc2:\n\tsleep 2; echo c2\nc3:\n\tsleep 2; echo c3\nc4:\n\tsleep 2; echo c4" | make -f - -j2

Stick it in a Makefile and it will be much more readable

.PHONY: c1 c2 c3 c4
all: c1 c2 c3 c4
c1:
        sleep 2; echo c1
c2:
        sleep 2; echo c2
c3:
        sleep 2; echo c3
c4:
        sleep 2; echo c4

Beware, those are not spaces at the beginning of the lines, they're a TAB, so a cut and paste won't work here.

Put an "@" infront of each command if you don't the command echoed. e.g.:

        @sleep 2; echo c1

This would stop on the first command that failed. If you need a count of the failures you'd need to engineer that in the makefile somehow. Perhaps something like

command || echo F >> failed

Then check the length of failed.

share|improve this answer
    
No, this won't do what I want. All the command lines are generated and I need to keep a total count of failed and okay. Plus I don't want to stop running if one of the children fails. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 17 '11 at 11:56
    
The "command || echo F >> failed" will make them continue when they fail. What do you mean by the commands are generated? How does that fit with this? –  linuts Jun 17 '11 at 12:44
    
I suppose I could generate the make file from the bash script. I wouldn't have much control over the output. Plus I still don't have an easy way to count the results (total number and failed). I'm not saying it won't work, it's just not an easy solution. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 17 '11 at 13:51

The problem you have is that you cannot wait for one of multiple background processes to complete. If you observe job status (using jobs) then finished background jobs are removed from the job list. You need another mechanism to determine whether a background job has finished.

The following example uses starts to background processes (sleeps). It then loops using ps to see if they are still running. If not it uses wait to gather the exit code and starts a new background process.

#!/bin/bash

sleep 3 &
pid1=$!
sleep 6 &
pid2=$!

while ( true ) do
    running1=`ps -p $pid1 --no-headers | wc -l`
    if [ $running1 == 0 ]
    then
        wait $pid1
        echo process 1 finished with exit code $?
        sleep 3 &
        pid1=$!
    else
        echo process 1 running
    fi

    running2=`ps -p $pid2 --no-headers | wc -l`
    if [ $running2 == 0 ]
    then
        wait $pid2
        echo process 2 finished with exit code $?
        sleep 6 &
        pid2=$!
    else
        echo process 2 running
    fi
    sleep 1
done

Edit: Using SIGCHLD (without polling):

#!/bin/bash

set -bm
trap 'ChildFinished' SIGCHLD

function ChildFinished() {
    running1=`ps -p $pid1 --no-headers | wc -l`
    if [ $running1 == 0 ]
    then
        wait $pid1
        echo process 1 finished with exit code $?
        sleep 3 &
        pid1=$!
    else
        echo process 1 running
    fi

    running2=`ps -p $pid2 --no-headers | wc -l`
    if [ $running2 == 0 ]
    then
        wait $pid2
        echo process 2 finished with exit code $?
        sleep 6 &
        pid2=$!
    else
        echo process 2 running
    fi
    sleep 1
}

sleep 3 &
pid1=$!
sleep 6 &
pid2=$!

sleep 1000d
share|improve this answer
    
Can this be done without the polling somehow? If I consume one processor just with BASH part of the value in running in parallel is somewhat lost. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 17 '11 at 10:38
    
Yes, using trap SIGCHLD. See my edit to my answer. –  qbert220 Jun 17 '11 at 10:49
    
Problem here is that ChildFinished could be called before you manage to set pid1. Obviously not with sleep 3 but some random process could exit quickly (particularly if it has an error at startup) –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 17 '11 at 10:59
    
How about using (sleep 1 && realcommand) &? This will always take at least one second before ChildFinished is called. There is still a race with the second command finishing, so perhaps set pid1 to 0 (invalid) before starting the next command and check that in ChildFinished. –  qbert220 Jun 17 '11 at 11:05
    
I don't like the sleep, but setting to 0 seems to be okay. I'll just skip 0 in the check, and each time I start a process do the check again after assigning the variable (in case already done). I'll wrap this in a few arrays and see if I can get it to work as I want. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jun 17 '11 at 11:28

I think the following example answers some of your questions, I am looking into the rest of question

(cat list1 list2 list3 | sort | uniq > list123) &
(cat list4 list5 list6 | sort | uniq > list456) &

from:

Running parallel processes in subshells

share|improve this answer

There is another package for debian systems named xjobs.

You might want to check it out:

http://packages.debian.org/wheezy/xjobs

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