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This has been nagging me for a while: What is the best layout for a switch statement, specifically in PHP?

I find myself doing it one of two ways, without even thinking about. Then, sometimes when I come back to the code I feel it doesn't look right and rewrite it the other way. Repeat!

Method 1

switch($action)
{
  case 'a':
    //do something
  break;

  case 'b':
    //do something
  break;
}

Advantages:

  • I feel the case/breaks line up like the brackets do in switch/if statements.
  • It looks better in my opinion

Disadvantages:

Method 2

switch($action)
{
  case 'a':
    //do something
    break;

  case 'b':
    //do something
    break;
}

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

  • When looking at code and I come across a break, I sometimes feel there's a missing end bracket from an if statement because it's indented so far.

So my question is, what is the proper way to layout switch statements? Am I wrong in using method 1?

share|improve this question
    
I also use method #1, although most of the editors I've used seem to follow the convention and use method #2 – Adam Hopkinson Jun 17 '11 at 10:19
4  
Neither method is 'wrong', it's personal preference. I use method 2. – markpsmith Jun 17 '11 at 10:20
    
markpsmith: I understand what you're saying about personal preference, but surely indentation should be standardised when working on code with other developers (and when trying not to battle your own opinions from an earlier date :)) – psynnott Jun 17 '11 at 10:22
    
I use method 2, personally. But I think standards should be instated by the company/group rather than the community ;) – Qix Jun 17 '11 at 10:26
    
method 2 is always better, since without indentation any code is unreadable – Ben Jun 17 '11 at 10:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sorry to post this as an answer, but I couldn't fit it into a comment:

I prefer method 2, because:

  • the breaks don't interfere with the readability of the cases

  • and sometimes you'll have breaks inside conditions, like:

    if(...) {
      break;
    }
    

    so the case could fall down to the next case or something.

    And for my personal preference it would feel awkward to use method 1 in this scenario, as the break would appear to be indented "too much".

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand why you say the break in method 1 feels like it's indented too much (method 2 is further indented)... can you explain? :) – psynnott Jun 17 '11 at 10:40
1  
@psynnott I know this sounds strange, but using method 1 (break on the line of case) and a conditional break (see the example), the conditional break would always have at least one indentation more than given by the structure. (Sorry, I really can't explain this any better as english is not my first language) – Yoshi Jun 17 '11 at 10:45
    
Thanks Yoshi, I understand now. With this combination, method 2 definately makes more sense. – psynnott Jun 17 '11 at 10:50
    
Agree, I bounced between both methods and ended up sticking with method 2. – Mike Purcell Aug 9 '12 at 20:49

Neither.

Not a "I have a better way and you should use that instead" but a "It doesnt matter."

A lot of coders get anal retentive about spacing, indentation, etc. The whole point though is that code is readable as it doesn't affect how it actually runs. You can make code readable via spacing, indentation, extra line returns, pretty comments separating sections, etc.

This is okay:

switch ('hi'){
    case 'hi': 
        PRINT "HI!";}

This is also okay:

switch ('hi')
{
    case 'hi': 
        PRINT "HI!";
}

Also okay:

    switch ('hi'){
        case 'hi': PRINT "HI!";
    }

Very nonstandard and timeconsuming so I don't know what you'd do it, but also okay:

// *
switch ('hi')
{
// ****   
case 'hi': PRINT "HI!";
// ****
}
// *

Seriously, as long as people can read it and easily discern what's going on, it's fine.

Unless your coworker and fellow coder is very intent on one style and OCD. At which point, you need to correct all of their code to a different style to make your workplace less boring.

share|improve this answer
    
I would ask why I got a downvote, but seriously, I'm not surprised. Some people get very anal retentive about their coding styles and intolerant of other styles, despite the fact there isn't (and never will be) a single majority-followed standard. ... and some don't like this being pointed out. – liljoshu Sep 14 '15 at 17:57

Method 3

switch($action)
{
    case 'a' : 
    {
        //do 
        //something

        break;
    }

    case 'b' : 
    {
        //do 
        //something

        break;
    }
}

or a little more compact

switch( $action ) {
    case 'a' : {
        //do 
        //something

        break;
    }
    case 'b' : {
        //do 
        //something

        break;
    }
}

Completely optional but valid bracket syntax. Improves readability drastically imho, especially for very large case statements.

share|improve this answer
switch($option){
case 'a': 
//do something; 
break;
case 'b': 
//do something; 
break;
defualt:
break;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Pretty code. What does it do? – user212218 Jun 18 '11 at 22:52
1  
Lol, if I were to work on code like this I would just assign the defect/feature to the person who wrote it. Not touching this mess... – Mike Purcell Aug 9 '12 at 20:49

There is no correct or incorrect method; The switch statement syntax is non-balanced, so there is no method to 'get it right'.

The defacto standard seems to be the second method. But if you are comfortable with you programming language, the indentation scheme does not matter all that much, as long as it is used consistently for the given code block.

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