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I want to do something like the following code shows:

class foo
{
private:
    std::fstream* m_stream;

public:
    foo(std::fstream* stream) : m_stream(stream) { }

    foo& write(char const* s, std::streamsize count)
    {
        if (/*condition*/)
        {
            m_stream->write(s, count);
        }
        else
        {
            // ...
        }

        return *this;
    }

    foo& read(char* s, std::streamsize count)
    {
        if (/*condition*/)
        {
            m_stream->read(s, count);
        }
        else
        {
            // ...
        }

        return *this;
    }
};

I would need to add the same behavior to all similar methods (e.g. put). This shouldn't be applied to file streams only, but all other stream classes. Is there any easy way to allow these functionality?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Many of the formatted output operators (operator<<) write directly to the underlying stream buffer. What you need to do in order to accomplish this in a general fashion is derive a class from std::basic_streambuf that forwards all data to another std::basic_streambuf, and then optionally create a minimal std::basic_ostream implementation to make using your stream buffer easier.

I wouldn't say this is particularly easy, though, but it's the only way to do this in a way that can affect all stream types.

Here is an example of a minimal stream buffer that forwards to another stream buffer (and performs some meaningless transformation just to demonstrate what you can do), and an accompanying stream:

#include <iostream>
#include <streambuf>

template<typename CharType, typename Traits = std::char_traits<CharType> >
class ForwardingStreamBuf : public std::basic_streambuf<CharType, Traits>
{
public:
    typedef Traits traits_type;
    typedef typename traits_type::int_type int_type;
    typedef typename traits_type::pos_type pos_type;
    typedef typename traits_type::off_type off_type;

    ForwardingStreamBuf(std::basic_streambuf<CharType, Traits> *baseStreamBuf)
        : _baseStreamBuf(baseStreamBuf)
    {
    }

protected:
    virtual int_type overflow(int_type c = traits_type::eof())
    {
        if( _baseStreamBuf == NULL )
            return traits_type::eof();

        if( traits_type::eq_int_type(c, traits_type::eof()) )
            return traits_type::not_eof(c);
        else
        {
            CharType ch = traits_type::to_char_type(c);
            if( ch >= 'A' && ch <= 'z' )
                ch++; // Do some meaningless transformation
            return _baseStreamBuf->sputc(ch);
        }
    }

    virtual int sync()
    {
        if( _baseStreamBuf == NULL )
            return -1;
        else
            return _baseStreamBuf->pubsync();
    }
private:
    std::basic_streambuf<CharType, Traits> *_baseStreamBuf;
};

template<typename CharType, typename Traits = std::char_traits<CharType> >
class ForwardingStream : public std::basic_ostream<CharType, Traits>
{
public:
    ForwardingStream(std::basic_ostream<CharType, Traits> &stream)
        : std::basic_ostream<CharType, Traits>(NULL), _buffer(stream.rdbuf())
    {
        this->init(&_buffer);
    }

    ForwardingStreamBuf<CharType, Traits>* rdbuf() const
    {
        return &_buffer;
    }
private:
    ForwardingStreamBuf<CharType, Traits> _buffer;
};

This can be used very simply:

int main()
{
    ForwardingStream<char> test(std::cout);
    test << "Foo" << std::endl;
}

Which would output Gpp. I hope that helps you on your way.

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How could I do that for non-virtual functions like eback, egptr, etc.? –  0xbadf00d Jun 17 '11 at 12:00
    
Deriving from streambuf is not the correct solution here. He'd got the basic idea right: define an independent class which doesn't derive from anything. And provide a templated operator<< for that. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '11 at 12:07
    
You don't need to override those. The only thing you need to override for basic functionality is overflow (if using output only). I've updated my answer with a basic sample of a forwarding stream buffer. –  Sven Jun 17 '11 at 12:19
    
How would I used it with (e.g.) fstream class? –  0xbadf00d Jun 17 '11 at 12:20
    
@Sven: I also need to "catch" everything that is read before it's actually read. –  0xbadf00d Jun 17 '11 at 12:21

Something like this?

   template <class Stream>
    class DecoratedStream {
    public:
      DecoratedStream(Stream* stream) : m_stream(stream) {}

      DecoratedStream& write(const char* data, int count) {
        m_stream->write(data, count);
      }

    };
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Not necessary. Just use iostream, rather than fstream. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '11 at 12:06

If I understand you correctly, you want to decorate methods of any iostream. So just make your decorator take an iostream as decoratee (as opposed to an fstream, which is a subclass of iostream).

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+1. Better. That way it will work for all I/O streams. –  Nawaz Jun 17 '11 at 11:15
    
Except quite a lot of operator<< functions output directly to the std::basic_streambuf used by the stream, and would therefore bypass this modification entirely. –  Sven Jun 17 '11 at 11:17
    
@Sven: Is that so? I was not aware of that. However, in that case it the entire approach of the OP would be invalid, because decorating the streams would not suffice, no matter how you do it. –  Björn Pollex Jun 17 '11 at 11:21
    
yes, I had to do something similar recently to add line wrapping functionality to any stream. The only way to do it is to derive a std::basic_streambuf that wraps another std::basic_streambuf. Inheriting from std::basic_ostream just won't help in most cases. That's what I said in my answer. –  Sven Jun 17 '11 at 11:24
    
@Sven How the operator<< functions work is irrelevant, because they don't get called until he actually outputs to the decorated stream. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '11 at 12:05

Having pointer inside a structure as your current approach is dangerous and error prone. Instead just derive such stream classes and implement basic constructors and wrap around your custom methods such as write().

template<typename StreamType>
class foo : StreamType
{
  // wrapper constructors supporting StreamType() constructors
  foo& write(char const* s, std::streamsize count)
  {
    //...
    return *this;
  }
};

Usage:

foo<fstream> obj;
obj.write(...);
share|improve this answer
    
Do not derive. Almost none of the functions of iostream are virtual, so you can't override them. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '11 at 12:04
    
@James, no need to override them as, we are simply going to use them as functionality extensions. There will be never a case of Base &b = Derived(); for this scenario. It's just a wrapper to add more functionality like custom read/write. Rest of all the methods will be used directly from the base class. –  iammilind Jun 17 '11 at 12:14
    
@lammilind In which case, I'd recommend simple free functions, which take an std::istream or an std::ostream as argument. No need for any additional complications. –  James Kanze Jun 17 '11 at 16:35

The usual solution for this sort of problem is to use templates. There aren't that many functions in an std::istream or and std::ostream which need covering, and a good template member for<<and>>should cover a lot of the cases. In most of the cases I've done this, I've only offerred<<or>>`. (Generally speaking, I've not needed bidirectional streams.)

As for handling other types of streams, just use std::iostream instead of std::fstream. (In general, except when opening files, you shouldn't see the fstream part.)

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