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Which of the following code is fastest/best practice for converting some object x?

int myInt = (int)x;

or

int myInt = Convert.ToInt32(x);

or

int myInt = Int32.Parse(x);

or in the case of a string 's'

int myInt;
Int32.TryParse(s, out myInt);

I'm curious on which performs the fastest for datatypes which have a method in Convert, not just ints. I just used int as an example.

Edit: This case arose from getting information back from a datatable. Will (int) still work the fastest?

From some testing, when object x =123123123, int performs the fastest, like many have said. When x is a string, Parse runs the fastest (note: cast throws an exception). What I am really curious is how they run when the value is being retrieved in the following way:

foreach(DataRow row in someTable.Rows)
{
    myInt = (int)row["some int value"];
    myInt2 = Int.Parse(row["some int value"]);
    myInt2 = Convert.ToInt32(row["some int value"]);
}
share|improve this question
    
The discussion on stackoverflow.com/questions/586436/… might be helpful –  Jeff Moser Mar 12 '09 at 13:39
3  
seems unlikely that this part of the program is your bottleneck when you've got DB queries in play –  David Heffernan Jul 17 '11 at 12:33

14 Answers 14

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Why don't you just try it a couple of thousand times?

(this goes for all "What is fastest:" questions)

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2  
I think a few million times might be better. –  WakeUpScreaming Mar 12 '09 at 13:12
3  
Make that a billion while you are at it ;) –  Binoj Antony Mar 13 '09 at 6:57
12  
I think, it's better to have that answer, here at SO. So the thousand people that want to know that don't need to run a thousand times. It's NOT the best question, but it's a question that was checked for over 8K people. –  Michel Ayres Apr 4 '13 at 16:51
    
@Demoncodemonkey What you say is true, but it's not an answer. –  Jacob Spire Apr 23 at 7:00

It depends on what you expect x to be

If x is a boxed int then (int)x is quickest.

If x is a string but is definitely a valid number then int.Parse(x) is best

If x is a string but it might not be valid then int.TryParse(x) is far quicker than a try-catch block.

The difference between Parse and TryParse is negligible in all but the very largest loops.

If you don't know what x is (maybe a string or a boxed int) then Convert.ToInt32(x) is best.

These generalised rules are also true for all value types with static Parse and TryParse methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Great post! +1 and I'd give you +2 if I could. –  Lukas Jan 13 at 20:09

Fastest != Best Practice!

For example, (int) is almost certainly the fastest because it's an operator rather than a function call, but it will only work in certain situations.

The best practice is to use the most readable code that won't negatively impact your performance, and 99 times out of 100 an integer conversion isn't driving your app's performance. If it is, use the most appropriate, narrowest conversion you can. Sometimes that's (int). Sometimes it's TryParse(). Sometimes it's Convert.ToInt32().

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If you know that the data is definitely int then int myInt = (int)x; should be the fastest option. Otherwise TryParse will help you to get it right without the slowness of exceptions.

BTW :

(int) only unboxes therefore faster,

(int) IL =

  .locals init (
        [0] object x,
        [1] int32 Y)
    L_0000: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0001: box int32
    L_0006: stloc.0 
    L_0007: ldloc.0 
    L_0008: unbox int32
    L_000d: ldobj int32
    L_0012: stloc.1 
    L_0013: ret

Convert.Toint32=

.locals init (
        [0] object x,
        [1] int32 Y)
    L_0000: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0001: box int32
    L_0006: stloc.0 
    L_0007: ldloc.0 
    L_0008: call object [mscorlib]System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers::GetObjectValue(object)
    L_000d: call int32 [mscorlib]System.Convert::ToInt32(object)
    L_0012: stloc.1 
    L_0013: ret
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah (int) != Convert.ToInt32, Gatekiller must be smoking bad stuff :) +1 –  leppie Mar 12 '09 at 13:08

When I have questions about performance differences between different ways of doing something specific like this, I usually make a new entry in my copy of MeasureIt, a free download from a great MSDN article from Vance Morrison. For more information please refer to the article.

By adding a simple bit of code to MeasureIt, I get the results below which compare the actual timings of the various methods of converting to int. Note the cast from string to int will throw an exception and isn't valid, so I just added the permutations that made sense to me.


Name                                                Median   Mean     StdDev   Min      Max    Samples       
IntCasts: Copy [count=1000 scale=10.0]              0.054    0.060    0.014    0.054    0.101    10       
IntCasts: Cast Int [count=1000 scale=10.0]          0.059    0.060    0.007    0.054    0.080    10       
IntCasts: Cast Object [count=1000 scale=10.0]       0.097    0.100    0.008    0.097    0.122    10       
IntCasts: int.Parse [count=1000 scale=10.0]         2.721    3.169    0.850    2.687    5.473    10       
IntCasts: Convert.ToInt32 [count=1000 scale=10.0]   3.221    3.258    0.067    3.219    3.418    10     


To find the best performance for the various types you are interested in, just extend the code below, which is literally all I had to add to MeasureIt to generate the above table.

static unsafe public void MeasureIntCasts()
{
	int result;
	int intInput = 1234;
	object objInput = 1234;
	string strInput = "1234";

	timer1000.Measure("Copy", 10, delegate
	{
		result = intInput;
	});
	timer1000.Measure("Cast Object", 10, delegate
	{
		result = (int)objInput;
	});

	timer1000.Measure("int.Parse", 10, delegate
	{
		result = int.Parse(strInput);
	});

	timer1000.Measure("Convert.ToInt32", 10, delegate
	{
		result = Convert.ToInt32(strInput);
	});
}
share|improve this answer
    
How about the average too? An increase sample size to a 'real world value' like 10000 at least. –  leppie Mar 13 '09 at 7:01
    
You also create a ton of overhead using closures. –  leppie Mar 13 '09 at 7:02

Best practice would be TryParse, and seeing the result of that, if it worked - otherwise you could get exceptions

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. Thinking about safety over speed is usually more important. –  Jordan Parmer Mar 12 '09 at 13:05
1  
But if you know it will cast or parse into an int, then you don't need to worry about an exception. –  Samuel Mar 12 '09 at 13:19
    
How do you "know"? Unless x is an int, you can't ever know for sure! –  Tundey Mar 12 '09 at 13:21
1  
When pulling data from a not null int column in a database with a data reader you can "know" that the data is an int. –  sgriffinusa Mar 12 '09 at 13:52
    
With SQLite, you might expect an int and in actuality get a long. Casting (int)cmd.ExecuteScalar() can fail when the returned value is a long. This goes for retrieving int primary keys and also "select count(*)". –  Elan Mar 12 '11 at 17:16

When optimising a bound data grid in .Net 2, I found almost half the time was spent in various object's ToString() methods that were then used as the inputs of Convert operations. By isolating these cases and by casting to the correct type where possible (since they were rows taken out of a database and the types could be relied upon) this caused a massive increase in speed of that data binding operation.

So, if you know the type of the thing up front and you'll hit the piece of code enough times, it's worth the effort to cast it directly instead of converting where necessary.

share|improve this answer

Extending the test of Eric Cosky by alternatives from Sam Allen, i found that if you know that your string is a valid integer, then parsing it by yourself is much faster.

I extended the test by the following cases:

    timer1000.Measure("IntParseFast", 10, delegate
    {
        result = Misc.IntParseFast(strInput);
    });

    timer1000.Measure("IntParseUnsafe", 10, delegate
    {
        result = Misc.IntParseUnsafe(strInput);
    });

With the following implementations:

public static int IntParseFast(string value)
{
    int result = 0;
    int length = value.Length;
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        result = 10 * result + (value[i] - 48);
    }
    return result;
}

public unsafe static int IntParseUnsafe(string value)
{
    int result = 0;
    fixed (char* v = value)
    {
        char* str = v;
        while (*str != '\0')
        {
            result = 10 * result + (*str - 48);
            str++;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

I get the following results:

IntCaint.Parse                5,495
IntCaConvert.ToInt32          5,653
IntCaIntParseFast             1,154
IntCaIntParseUnsafe           1,245
share|improve this answer

Not sure about performance, but these methods aren't the same at all. Both Parse and TryParse work with string, the String representation of an object is parsed (see MSDN).

Converts the string representation of a number to its 32-bit signed integer equivalent.

Not sure about casting and the Convert class, but cast is only for objects that are already integers in fact but not strongly typed.

Matthias

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If you had the need for the extra speed, it would be easy to test the different the different options. Since you aren't testing them, you mustn't need them. Don't waste your time with pointless micro-optimizations!

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(int) conversion on string won't work, so I dont test it. Convert.ToInt32 reflects as testing the value to null and THEN calling int.Parse, so should in general tend to be slower than int.Parse().

share|improve this answer
foreach(DataRow row in someTable.Rows)
{
    myInt = (int)row["some int value"];
    myInt2 = Int.Parse(row["some int value"]);
    myInt2 = Convert.ToInt32(row["some int value"]);
}

For this example, if the value coming from the table is indeed an int value, or comparable database value, then using the

myInt = (int)row["some int value"];

would be the most efficient, and hence the 'fastest' becuase the

row["some int value"];

will be a value-type int instance boxed inside an reference-type object instance, so using the explicit type cast will be the quickest becuase as other people said it is an operation not a function call, thereby reducing the cpu operations required. A call to a converion or parse method would require extra cpu operations and hence not be as 'fast'.

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this is not true. The fast conversion is direct cast:

int i = (int) stringData;

watch.Elapsed = {00:00:00.1732388}
watch2.Elapsed= {00:00:00.0878196}


 // Mesary start
                Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

                watch.Start();
                for (int f = 1; f < 1000000; f++)
                {
                    item.Count = FastInt32.IntParseFast(dt.Rows[i]["TopCount"]);
                }   // Execute the task to be timed
                watch.Stop();

                Console.WriteLine("Elapsed: {0}", watch.Elapsed);
                Console.WriteLine("In milliseconds: {0}", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
                Console.WriteLine("In timer ticks: {0}", watch.ElapsedTicks);
                // Mesary end


                // Mesary start
                Stopwatch watch2 = new Stopwatch();

                watch2.Start();
                for (int n = 1; n < 1000000; n++)
                {
                    item.Count = (int)(dt.Rows[i]["TopCount"]);
                }   // Execute the task to be timed
                watch2.Stop();

                Console.WriteLine("Elapsed: {0}", watch2.Elapsed);
                Console.WriteLine("In milliseconds: {0}", watch2.ElapsedMilliseconds);
                Console.WriteLine("In timer ticks: {0}", watch2.ElapsedTicks);
                // Mesary end
share|improve this answer

In the end, they all end up calling:

System.Number.ParseInt32(string s, NumberStyles style, NumberFormatInfo info);

So in summary, there will be no difference what so ever.

Have a look in .Net Reflector to see this.

share|improve this answer
    
is (int)x really call Int32.Parse() ? And the second question would be what the code do before callin Int32.Parse(), that'd also effect the performance. –  dr. evil Mar 12 '09 at 13:01
    
(int) is just short hand for Convert.ToInt32, which calls System.Number.ParseInt32(). No difference at all. Any performance difference will only be measurable in Pico seconds. –  GateKiller Mar 12 '09 at 13:04
    
GateKiller: I call BS, it's just a simple cast and unbox. –  leppie Mar 12 '09 at 13:07
    
Try Parse also has an internal try catch to implement which, although small, is still overhead, making it slower (by pico seconds) than the exception throwing "parse" –  DevinB Mar 12 '09 at 13:08
    
I'm with leppie: it might do that you try to cast a string, but check reflector for casting other types as well- double, long, object, etc. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 12 '09 at 13:08

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