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I have a small Scala/Neo4j application that links people and topics through "skilledAt" and "interestedIn" relations. It has a REST/Json Api (using Scalatra) and I ran into a typical type-erasure problem when I wanted to add an "asJson" method to List[Person] and List[Topic]. I would like to implement different Json serialization behaviour for the different content types but of course the types get erased. The best I've been able to come up with so far is the following runtime trick:

implicit def topicsOrPeopleAsJson[T](list: List[T]) = new {
    def asJson: String = {
        list match {
            case head :: tail if (head.isInstanceOf[Topic]) => topicsToJson(list.asInstanceOf[List[Topic]])
            case head :: tail if (head.isInstanceOf[Person]) => peopleToJson(list.asInstanceOf[List[Person]])
            case _ => "[]"
        }
    }

    private def peopleToJson(people: List[Person]) = {
        ...
    }

    private def topicsToJson(topics: List[Topic]) = {
        ...
    }
}

This works just fine but I was wondering whether there was a better solution, maybe something including type classes, a topic I'm not very familiar with (yet).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use another level of implicit (this is typeclasses indeed) :

trait ListToJsonConverter[T] { def asJson(l: List[T]) : String }
implicit object PeopleToJsonConverter extends ListToJsonConverter[Person] {...}
impicit object TopicToJsonConverter extends ListToJsonConverter[Topic] {...}
implicit object DefaultJsonConverter extends ListToJsonConverter[Any] {
  def asJSon(l: List[Any]) = "[]"
}
implicit def topicsOrPeopleAsJson[T](list: List[T])(implicit ev : ListToJsonConverter[T]) = new {
  def asJson = ev.asJson(list)
}

This may not be exactly what you asked for however. The converter will be chosen at compile time. So if you call with a list of person which the compiler knows only as a List[Any], it will not work as expected.

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This looks very straightforward and has the added benefit of being very decoupled from the original domain. Thanks! –  Age Mooij Jun 17 '11 at 12:16
    
It works and all my unit tests are still green. Thanks again! The "S" in "Json" in the above example has the wrong case here and there and the main implicit def topicsOrPeopleAsJson is missing an " = new " at the end. Maybe you could edit your example for future use? –  Age Mooij Jun 17 '11 at 12:30

Why not do it the OO way?

trait JSONable {
  def toJSON:String
}

class Person
class Topics

implicit def persontoJSONable(p:Person) = new PersonSerializer(p)
implicit def topicToJSONable(t:Topic) = new PersonSerializer(t)

class PersonSerializer(p:Person) extends JSONable {
  override def toJSON = {
    //...
  }
}

class TopicSerializer(t:Topic) extends JSONable {
  override def toJSON = {
    //...
  }
}

def ListAsJSON[T <% JSONable](l:List[T]) = {
  l.map(_.toJSON)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I'd like to keep the JSON aspect completely separate but it looks good, thanks! I'll try this one too but I've always wanted to try out some type classes so I'll try that answer first :) –  Age Mooij Jun 17 '11 at 12:11
    
An added problem for my very specific case is that I'd like to serialize to different JSON when a Person or a Topic is in a list, so the closer I get to inline access to the "real" type without too many levels of indirection, the better –  Age Mooij Jun 17 '11 at 12:14
    
I fleshed out the view bound option a bit to show how you can seperate the serialization logic from the model classes. –  Kim Stebel Jun 17 '11 at 12:35

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