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I want to call a member function which is virtual (inheritance is used in most places to keep things simple), but I want to force calling it using non-virtual dispatch sometimes, in performance critical places, and in such places the exact type is known compile time. I do this for performance reasons, on a platform where virtual call performance is bad. For most functionality the overhead of virtual functions is fine, but for a few it is not. I would like to avoid duplicating all functions as both virtual and non-virtual.

Example:

class Interface
{
  public:
  virtual void Do(){}   
};

class Implementation: public Interface
{
  public:
  virtual void Do(){}   
};


void DoIt(Interface &func)
{
  func.Do();
};

int main()
{
  Implementation a;
  DoIt(a);
  // can DoIt be constructed as a template to avoid virtual dispatch?
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
The compiler should detect such cases and automatically use static dispatch. –  Karel Petranek Jun 17 '11 at 14:09
1  
@dark_charlie: only in the most trivial cases. Non-trivial cases must be covered by link-time- or other global-optimization techniques, which is not too widespread or very young in compilers, and in cases where a virtual function is called via a hard to predict pointer/reference, almost no compiler would static dispatch. –  phresnel Jun 17 '11 at 14:32
    
You may implement Implementation::Do() in terms of a non-virtual Implementation::DoImpl() and call the latter in performance-critical places. –  n.m. Jun 17 '11 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you know the exact type you can do it as:

template <typename StaticType>
void DoIt(Interface &func)
{
  static_cast<StaticType&>(func).StaticType::Do();
};

Where you need to manually downcast to the type you need (static_cast is fine if you do know the type). Then you need to qualify the method call, do disable dynamic dispatch.

struct DerivedType : Interface {
    virtual void Do() { std::cout << "Derived::Do" << std::endl; }   
};
struct MostDerived : DerivedType {
    virtual void Do() { std::cout << "MostDerived::Do" << std::endl; }
};
void processDerived( Interface & iface ) {
   DoIt<DerivedType>( iface );
}
int main() {
   MostDerived obj;
   DoIt<Derived>( obj );    // Will call Derived::Do
}

Note that using the qualified name will disable dynamic dispatch, and that means that it will not be dispatched to the runtime type of the object, but to the type that you tell it to call.

share|improve this answer
    
Great. I have modified it a bit, as it seems nicer to me. Often I already have the exact type and there is no need to cast:template <typename Implementation> void DoIt(Implementation&func) { func.Implementation::Do(); }; can be used as Do(static_cast<StaticType&>(func)) when needed. –  Suma Jun 17 '11 at 16:06
    
.. and in my typical case where compiler already knows the exact type it will be used simply as Do(func). –  Suma Jun 17 '11 at 16:37

I think you are looking for Curiously Recurring Template Pattern (CRTP) which enables you static polymorphism :

template <typename Derived>
class Base {
public:
    virtual ~Base() {}
    void foo() { Derived::func_in_derived(); }
};
class Derived : public Base<Derived> {
public:
    void func_in_derived() {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly, but you are correct the technique will be similar in the end. The function performing the work is however a kind of unrelated and I do not want to make it a base class of Interface/Implementation. –  Suma Jun 17 '11 at 16:08

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