Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an entity that has a NON-ID field that must be set from a sequence. Currently, I fetch for the first value of the sequence, store it on the client's side, and compute from that vaule.

However, I'm looking for a "better" way of doing this. I have implemented a way to fetch the next sequence value:

public Long getNextKey()
{
    Query query = session.createSQLQuery( "select nextval('mySequence')" );
    Long key = ((BigInteger) query.uniqueResult()).longValue();
    return key;
}

However, this way reduces the performance significantly (creation of ~5000 objects gets slowed down by a factor of 3 - from 5740ms to 13648ms ).

I have tried to add a "fake" entity:

@Entity
@SequenceGenerator(name = "sequence", sequenceName = "mySequence")
public class SequenceFetcher
{
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE, generator = "sequence")
    private long                      id;

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }
}

However this approach didn't work either (all the Ids returned were 0 ).

Can someone advise me how to efficiently fetch the next sequence value using Hibernate?

Edit: Upon investigation, I have discovered that calling Query query = session.createSQLQuery( "select nextval('mySequence')" ); is by far more inefficient than using the @GeneratedValue- because Hibernate somehow manages to reduce the number of fetches when accessing the sequence described by @GeneratedValue.

For example, when I create 70,000 entities, (thus with 70,000 primary keys fetched from the same sequence) , I get everything I need.

HOWEVER , Hibernate only issues 1404 select nextval ('local_key_sequence') commands. NOTE: On the database side, the caching is set to 1.

If I try to fetch all the data manually, it will take me 70,000 selects, thus a huge difference in performance. Does anyone know the internal functionning of Hibernate, and how to manually reproduce it?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

Here is what worked for me (specific to Oracle, but using scalar seems to be the key)

Long getNext() {
    Query query = 
        session.createSQLQuery("select MYSEQ.nextval as num from dual")
            .addScalar("num", StandardBasicTypes.BIG_INTEGER);

    return ((BigInteger) query.uniqueResult()).longValue();
}

Thanks to the posters here: springsource_forum

share|improve this answer
1  
As a note, you can also use StandardBasicTypes.LONG instead of StandardBasicTypes.BIG_INTEGER... –  rogerdpack Jun 25 '13 at 22:32
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I found the solution:

public class DefaultPostgresKeyServer
{
    private Session session;
    private Iterator<BigInteger> iter;
    private long batchSize;

    public DefaultPostgresKeyServer (Session sess, long batchFetchSize)
    {
        this.session=sess;
        batchSize = batchFetchSize;
        iter = Collections.<BigInteger>emptyList().iterator();
    }

        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        public Long getNextKey()
        {
            if ( ! iter.hasNext() )
            {
                Query query = session.createSQLQuery( "SELECT nextval( 'mySchema.mySequence' ) FROM generate_series( 1, " + batchSize + " )" );

                iter = (Iterator<BigInteger>) query.list().iterator();
            }
            return iter.next().longValue() ;
        }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Just a note: As the class indicates this works on PostgreSQL only, because the SQL syntax is referent from Oracle. –  Paulo Fidalgo Aug 7 '13 at 15:10

If you are using Oracle, consider specifying cache size for the sequence. If you are routinely create objects in batches of 5K, you can just set it to a 1000 or 5000. We did it for the sequence used for the surrogate primary key and were amazed that execution times for an ETL process hand-written in Java dropped in half.

I could not paste formatted code into comment. Here's the sequence DDL:

create sequence seq_mytable_sid 
minvalue 1 
maxvalue 999999999999999999999999999 
increment by 1 
start with 1 
cache 1000 
order  
nocycle;
share|improve this answer
    
that sounds like an interesting approach. Can you tell me what annotations you used to set the batch creation (and thus the batch fetching of sequence values)? –  iliaden Jun 17 '11 at 14:13
    
@iliaden: I specified cache size in the sequence DDL. I couldn't paste code into the comment, so I edited the answer. –  Olaf Jun 17 '11 at 14:20
    
@Olaf: cache 1000 seems to be the needed field, but how can I map it in Hibernate? –  iliaden Jun 17 '11 at 14:42
    
@iliaden: If your previous strategy is working, just slow, the change to the sequence definition should do the magic. In our case we haven't had to change anything in the app, or do a new build. –  Olaf Jun 17 '11 at 14:52
    
@ Olaf: I've investigated a bit deeper. And discovered some black voodoo magic. See the edited question –  iliaden Jun 17 '11 at 16:00

You can use Hibernate Dialect API for Database independence as follow

class SequenceValueGetter {
private SessionFactory sessionFactory;

// For Hibernate 3
public Long getId(final String sequenceName) {
    final List<Long> ids = new ArrayList<Long>(1);

    sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().doWork(new Work() {
        public void execute(Connection connection) throws SQLException {
            DialectResolver dialectResolver = new StandardDialectResolver();
            Dialect dialect =  dialectResolver.resolveDialect(connection.getMetaData());
            PreparedStatement preparedStatement = null;
            ResultSet resultSet = null;
            try {
                preparedStatement = connection.prepareStatement( dialect.getSequenceNextValString(sequenceName));
                resultSet = preparedStatement.executeQuery();
                resultSet.next();
                ids.add(resultSet.getLong(1));
            }catch (SQLException e) {
                throw e;
            } finally {
                if(preparedStatement != null) {
                    preparedStatement.close();
                }
                if(resultSet != null) {
                    resultSet.close();
                }
            }
        }
    });
    return ids.get(0);
}

// For Hibernate 4
public Long getID(final String sequenceName) {
    ReturningWork<Long> maxReturningWork = new ReturningWork<Long>() {
        @Override
        public Long execute(Connection connection) throws SQLException {
            DialectResolver dialectResolver = new StandardDialectResolver();
            Dialect dialect =  dialectResolver.resolveDialect(connection.getMetaData());
            PreparedStatement preparedStatement = null;
            ResultSet resultSet = null;
            try {
                preparedStatement = connection.prepareStatement( dialect.getSequenceNextValString(sequenceName));
                resultSet = preparedStatement.executeQuery();
                resultSet.next();
                return resultSet.getLong(1);
            }catch (SQLException e) {
                throw e;
            } finally {
                if(preparedStatement != null) {
                    preparedStatement.close();
                }
                if(resultSet != null) {
                    resultSet.close();
                }
            }

        }
    };
    Long maxRecord = sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().doReturningWork(maxReturningWork);
    return maxRecord;
}

}

share|improve this answer

To get the new id, all you have to do is flush the entity manager. See getNext() method below:

@Entity
@SequenceGenerator(name = "sequence", sequenceName = "mySequence")
public class SequenceFetcher
{
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE, generator = "sequence")
    private long id;

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public static long getNext(EntityManager em) {
        SequenceFetcher sf = new SequenceFetcher();
        em.persist(sf);
        em.flush();
        return sf.getId();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's the problem - the sequence is NOT for a primary key (NOT the ID field). Although I will investigate on the use of SequenceFetcher –  iliaden Jun 17 '11 at 14:13
1  
The SequenceFether was an extra class approach, but hibernate forcefully maps it to a [non-existent] table. –  iliaden Jun 17 '11 at 14:18

POSTGRESQL

String psqlAutoincrementQuery = "SELECT NEXTVAL(CONCAT(:psqlTableName, '_id_seq')) as id";

Long psqlAutoincrement = (Long) YOUR_SESSION_OBJ.createSQLQuery(psqlAutoincrementQuery)
                                                      .addScalar("id", Hibernate.LONG)
                                                      .setParameter("psqlTableName", psqlTableName)
                                                      .uniqueResult();

MYSQL

String mysqlAutoincrementQuery = "SELECT AUTO_INCREMENT as id FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_name = :mysqlTableName AND table_schema = DATABASE()";

Long mysqlAutoincrement = (Long) YOUR_SESSION_OBJ.createSQLQuery(mysqlAutoincrementQuery)
                                                          .addScalar("id", Hibernate.LONG)
                                                          .setParameter("mysqlTableName", mysqlTableName)                                                              
                                                          .uniqueResult();
share|improve this answer
1  
Your theory is sound, and it did help me, but your SQL is vulnerable to injection. That's never good. –  Makoto Nov 20 '13 at 17:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.