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Started looking at the win32 API on this site: http://www.winprog.org/tutorial/start.html

I've literally just compiled the first example and it's given me a message prompt in chinese/japanese, or something along those lines.

Question: Why?

Obviously as far as my understanding goes, I should be getting "Goodbye, cruel world!" in a message box (Presumably titled 'Note').

#include <windows.h>

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
MessageBox(NULL, "Goodbye, cruel world!", "Note", MB_OK);
return 0;
}

Foreign...

Thanks.

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3  
I am extremely terrified of Chinese people... and Chinese message boxes :D –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 17 '11 at 14:00
    
Looks like an encoding problem. –  Etienne de Martel Jun 17 '11 at 14:00
2  
You're using ANSI strings, but compiling for Unicode. Maybe that web site should have mentioned something about that... –  Gabe Jun 17 '11 at 14:01
    
See Tim Minchin's song called "Three Minute Song", he answers your question. For China! For China! For China! youtube.com/watch?v=58mE7Vy1Xrc –  user405725 Jun 17 '11 at 14:34
2  
That shouldn't have compiled cleanly. Turn on STRICT, and pay attention to warnings like "forcing char* to const wchar_t*". –  Ben Voigt Jun 17 '11 at 19:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try to change the code like this:

#include <windows.h>

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
MessageBox(NULL, L"Goodbye, cruel world!", L"Note", MB_OK);
return 0;
}

If it works is because you are missing some header that point the correct API, you seem calling MessageBoxW ( the unicode version ) with an ANSI string. If this is not just a test but you are beginning to write a real world program, consider to ensure what kind of caracter you want to use ( this is a precompiler flag usually ). Then use the macro _T( to have your literals compatible both to unicode/ansi.

Edit from @Benoit comment: Starting a new project with VS 2008/10 sets unicode character set by default.

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Success. :) Will mark it as correct when the timer allows. –  Anonymous Jun 17 '11 at 14:09
3  
I would add: starting with Visual Studio 2008 (or maybe 2010) new projects use the Unicode character set by default. –  Benoit Jun 17 '11 at 14:42
    
Hardcoding Unicode strings is just as problematic as hardcoding ANSI strings. Either respect the project-wide Unicode setting and use _T("string") or explicitly use the function that matches: MessageBoxA for ANSI and MessageBoxW for Unicode. –  Ben Voigt Jun 17 '11 at 19:10
MessageBox(NULL, _T("Goodbye, cruel world!"), _T("Note"), MB_OK);

or

MessageBoxA(NULL, "Goodbye, cruel world!", "Note", MB_OK);
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I can't get it set to default, so each new project it must be set. To find the setting: Using Visual Studio 2010 From the main Menu → Projects → Properties → Configuration Properties → General → Project Details → Character Set → "Use Multi-Byte Character set" (was set to "Use Unicode Character Set")

After that all seems well.

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