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we have "Profile" table with over 60 columns like (Id, fname, lname, gender, profilestate, city, state, degree, ...).

users search other peopel on website. query is like :

WITH TempResult as (        
select ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY @sortColumn DESC) as RowNum, profile.id from Profile 
where 
   (@a is null or a = @a) and
   (@b is null or b = @b) and
   ...(over 60 column)
)
SELECT profile.* FROM TempResult join profile on TempResult.id = profile.id
WHERE 
     (RowNum >= @FirstRow)
     AND 
     (RowNum <= @LastRow)

sql server by default use clustered index for execution query. but total execution time is over 300. we test another solution such as multi column index in all columns in where clause but total execution time is over 400. do you have any solution to make total execution time lower than 100. we using sql server 2008.

share|improve this question
    
Have you checked all your table relations from Index point of view,Indexing also increases the cost execution !! or, we need to tune the query –  goofyui Jun 17 '11 at 14:11
    
yes checked, we need tuning –  mmtemporary Jun 17 '11 at 14:30
1  
I assume the WHERE clause needs AND between the 60 different column checks? –  MatBailie Jun 17 '11 at 14:30
    
ok that's right –  mmtemporary Jun 17 '11 at 14:42

4 Answers 4

This is a classic "SQL Filter" query problem. I've found that the typical approaches of "(@b is null or b = @b)" & it's common derivatives all yeild mediocre performance. The OR clause tends to be the cause.

Over the years I've done a lot of Perf/Tuning & Query Optimisation. The Approach I've found best is to generate Dynamic SQL inside a Stored Proc. Most times you also need to add "with Recompile" on the statement. The Stored Proc helps reduce potential for SQL injection attacks. The Recompile is needed to force the selection of indexes appropriate to the parameters you are searching on. Generally it is at least an order of magnitude faster.

I agree you should also look at points mentioned above like :-

  1. If you commonly only refer to a small subset of the columns you could create non-clustered "Covering" indexes.

  2. Highly selective (ie:those with many unique values) columns will work best if they are the lead colum in the index.

  3. If many colums have a very small number of values, consider using The BIT datatype. OR Create your own BITMASKED BIGINT to represent many colums ie: a form of "Enumerated datatyle". But be careful as any function in the WHERE clause (like MOD or bitwise AND/OR) will prevent the optimiser from choosing an index. It works best if you know the value for each & can combine them to use an equality or range query.

  4. While often good to find RoWID's with a small query & then join to get all the other columns you want to retrieve. (As you are doing above) This approach can sometimes backfire. If the 1st part of the query does a Clustred Index Scan then often it is faster to get the otehr columns you need in the select list & savethe 2nd table scan. So always good to try it both ways & see what works best.

  5. Remember to run SET STATISTICS IO ON & SET STATISTICS TIME ON. Before running your tests. Then you can see where the IO is & it may help you with index selection, for the mose frequent combination of paramaters. I hope this makes sense without long code samples. (it is on my other machine)

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Unfortunately I don't think there is a pure SQL solution to your issue. Here are a couple alternatives:

  • Dynamic SQL - build up a query that only includes WHERE clause statements for values that are actually provided. Assuming the average search actually only fills in 2-3 fields, indexes could be added and utilized.
  • Full Text Search - go to something more like a Google keyword search. No individual options.
  • Lucene (or something else) - Search outside of SQL; This is a fairly significant change though.

One other option that I just remembered implementing in a system once. Create a vertical table that includes all of the data you are searching on and build up a query for it. This is easiest to do with dynamic SQL, but could be done using Table Value Parameters or a temp table in a pinch.

The idea is to make a table that looks something like this:

  • Profile ID
  • Attribute Name
  • Attribute Value

The table should have a unique index on (Profile ID, Attribute Name) (unique to make the search work properly, index will make it perform well).

In this table you'd have rows of data like:

  • (1, 'city', 'grand rapids')
  • (1, 'state', 'MI')
  • (2, 'city', 'detroit')
  • (2, 'state', 'MI')

Then your SQL will be something like:

SELECT *
FROM Profile
    JOIN (
        SELECT ProfileID
        FROM ProfileAttributes
        WHERE (AttributeName = 'city' AND AttributeValue = 'grand rapids')
            AND (AttributeName = 'state' AND AttributeValue = 'MI')
        GROUP BY ProfileID
        HAVING COUNT(*) = 2
    ) SelectedProfiles ON Profile.ProfileID = SelectedProfiles.ProfileID
... -- Add your paging here

Like I said, you could use a temp table that has attribute name/values:

SELECT *
FROM Profile
    JOIN (
        SELECT ProfileID
        FROM ProfileAttributes
            JOIN PassedInAttributeTable ON ProfileAttributes.AttributeName = PassedInAttributeTable.AttributeName
                 AND ProfileAttributes.AttributeValue = PassedInAttributeTable.AttributeValue
        GROUP BY ProfileID
        HAVING COUNT(*) = CountOfRowsInPassedInAttributeTable -- calculate or pass in
    ) SelectedProfiles ON Profile.ProfileID = SelectedProfiles.ProfileID
... -- Add your paging here

As I recall, this ended up performing very well, even on fairly complicated queries (though I think we only had 12 or so columns).

share|improve this answer
    
what about index? –  mmtemporary Jun 18 '11 at 2:21
    
I've used this solution in the past, and found it to be very flexible and powerful. While the table was relatively small it was also relatively fast. The difficulty was optimisation once the attribute table grew large (around a million entries - taking up to half a second per search). The optimisation ended up being caching search results, as our searches were for mapping purposes (so the same search being frequently repeated, rather than 'random' searches from humans). –  MatBailie Jun 18 '11 at 12:44

As a single query, I can't think of a clever way of optimising this.

Provided that each column's check is highly selective, however, the following (very long winded) code, might prove faster, assuming each individual column has it's own separate index...

WITH
  filter AS (
SELECT
  [a].*
FROM
  (SELECT * FROM Profile WHERE @a IS NULL OR a = @a) AS [a]
INNER JOIN
  (SELECT id FROM Profile WHERE b = @b UNION ALL SELECT NULL WHERE @b IS NULL) AS [b]
    ON ([a].id = [b].id) OR ([b].id IS NULL)
INNER JOIN
  (SELECT id FROM Profile WHERE c = @c UNION ALL SELECT NULL WHERE @c IS NULL) AS [c]
    ON ([a].id = [c].id) OR ([c].id IS NULL)
.
.
.
INNER JOIN
  (SELECT id FROM Profile WHERE zz = @zz UNION ALL SELECT NULL WHERE @zz IS NULL) AS [zz]
    ON ([a].id = [zz].id) OR ([zz].id IS NULL)
)
, TempResult as (        
SELECT
  ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY @sortColumn DESC) as RowNum,
  [filter].*
FROM
  [filter]
)
SELECT
  *
FROM
  TempResult
WHERE 
      (RowNum >= @FirstRow)
  AND (RowNum <= @LastRow)

EDIT

Also, thinking about it, you may even get the same result just by having the 60 individual indexes. SQL Server can do INDEX MERGING...

share|improve this answer
    
Im tested this solution with 4 columns. total execution time is about 180. we need better solution. thanx –  mmtemporary Jun 17 '11 at 15:39
    
Which did you test? The 60 joins, or just applying 60 indexes and using your original query? –  MatBailie Jun 18 '11 at 12:47
    
tested exactly your solution with 4 columns and 4 seperate index –  mmtemporary Jun 18 '11 at 17:10
    
Have you tried the suggestion in the edit? Your code, but each column having it's own separate index? –  MatBailie Jun 19 '11 at 17:01
    
yes Dems exactly your solution –  mmtemporary Jun 20 '11 at 14:47

You've several issues imho. One is that you're going to end up with a seq scan no matter what you do.

But I think your more crucial issue here is that you've an unnecessary join:

SELECT profile.* FROM TempResult
WHERE 
     (RowNum >= @FirstRow)
     AND 
     (RowNum <= @LastRow)
share|improve this answer
    
this inner join improve performance a little. –  mmtemporary Jun 17 '11 at 15:18

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