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Introduction

I have an algorithm which takes a pointer to a char array. The algorithm first retrieves the length of the array then reverses the array.

The problem

The problem I have is that I want to use this on a wchar_t array. And want to be able to do this without having to copy the whole function, change the name and the type of the argument.

Here is the mentioned function:

void reverseString(char *str){
  unsigned int l = getStringLength(str);
  int i = 0;
  int m = l >> 1;

  while(i < m){
    str[i] ^= str[l - 1];
    str[l - 1] ^= str[i];
    str[i] ^= str[l - 1];
    i++;
    l--;
  }
}

From googling and reading on SO this won't be able to use a void pointer (conceptually same thing using a union) since it would leave me with a solution like this, which to me is equally bad as writing separate functions but with different names and argument types:

void reverseString(void *array, short typeSize){
  unsigned int l = getArrayLength(array);
  int m = l >> 1;
  int i = 0;
  char *str = 0;
  wchar_t *wstr = 0;

  if(typeSize == 1){
    str = (char *) array;
    while(i < m){
      str[i] ^= str[l - 1];
      str[l - 1] ^= str[i];
      str[i] ^= str[l - 1];
      i++;
      l--;
    }
  }else if(typeSize == 4){
    wstr = (wchar_t *) array;
    while(i < m){
      wstr[i] ^= wstr[l - 1];
      wstr[l - 1] ^= wstr[i];
      wstr[i] ^= wstr[l - 1];
      i++;
      l--;
    }
  }
}

Note: getStringLength is just a function which loops through the pointer till it gets to '\0' and returns the iteration sum.

The answer

I am looking for an answer which tells me how to do this in a nicer way without having to rewrite the internals of the algorithm, or an answer saying that it won't be possible to do it any other way. I'm not looking for an answer telling me I should use this and that library which does this for me, because I'm not using this in production code, it's purely educational to get a better understanding of how memory management works and other concepts alike.

Edit: The function I showed is just an example, I'm looking for a universal solution to problems with algorithms alike.

share|improve this question
    
What are your thoughts on macros? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 17 '11 at 14:46
3  
Don't use the l for single letter variables. All single letter variables are bad, but l is &^%#*@ stupid and &*#%( demonical. –  pmg Jun 17 '11 at 14:49
    
@pmg I think telling someone to do something without telling them why they should is &^%#*@ stupid and &*#%( demonical. –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 15:24
    
I though the reason for suggesting avoidance of the single letter variable l was apparent ... but I'll heed your advice and try harder in the future to explain the reasons behing my suggestions. Thank you. –  pmg Jun 17 '11 at 16:01
    
@pmg Thank you for not taking it the wrong way. I think that obvious knowledge will differ from person to person, that's why I think it's better to explain what you mean. I will also heed your advice, so thank you for that! :) –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using "generics" in C is likely to produce code that is noticeably slower and more convoluted / difficult to read / difficult to maintain than the original code. Use the preprocessor if you must do this.

My recommendation is to avoid this technique if at all possible: you should really only use char or wchar_t in your program, not a mixture of both! (char or UChar or almost universally preferable since you can choose the encoding, but I digress...)

#define gchar char
#define gstrlen strlen
#define func_name reverse
#include "reverse_impl.h"
#undef gchar
#undef gstrlen
#undef func_name

#define gchar wchar_t
#define gstrlen wstrlen
#define func_name wreverse
#include "reverse_impl.h"
#undef gchar
#undef gstrlen
#undef func_name

Then, in reverse_impl.h:

void func_name(gchar *str)
{
    gchar *p = str, *q = str + gstrlen(str), t;
    if (p == q)
       return;
    q--;
    for (; p < q; p++, q--) {
        t = *p;
        *p = *q;
        *q = t;
    }
}

Also, DO NOT DO THIS:

x ^= y; // bad!
y ^= x;
x ^= y;

It is more difficult to read and quite possibly much slower to execute.

Also, note that both reverse and wreverse will make garbage if you give them Unicode input: reverse will make malformed output and wreverse can switch the diacritics around or totally screw up Hangul, depending on how they're represented.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for giving me a solution which is straightforward. Also the points about the other things around the answer are appreciated. I will read up on macros and preprocessor. I haven't read anything about that yet. –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 19:22
    
Also, I thought that the XOR swapping would be faster since it doesn't use extra memory to store the char. But now when I think about it, the actual XOR instruction takes more time than the moving/copying instruction. Have I understood this correctly? –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 19:29
    
The compiler already knows all of the tricks, if you write clean code. If you use a temporary variable, the compiler is capable of turning a swap into a complete no-op in many cases through flow analysis. In other cases, the compiler writers usually know the fastest way to swap a variable and you don't. Clever tricks like this often hurt performance for other reasons because they sabotage the compiler's ability to perform flow analysis for the rest of the function. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 17 '11 at 19:31
    
Thanks for the explanation and all the other hints! The pieces are beginning to fall into place :) –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 19:39

It's unlikely to be efficient, but you could easily have your void reverseString(void *array, short typeSize) version reverse the elements via trivial pointer arithmetic and memcpys of the relevant size.

Of course, this approach isn't applicable to every algorithm that you want to make type-agnostic. It's not clear from your question whether you only care about this particular algorithm, or algorithms in general.

[As an aside: Note that using an XOR swap is unlikely to be more efficient than doing it "naively". It's certainly less readable!]

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your thoughts on this. I edited my question so that I'm asking for a more universal solution rather than a specific solution for this algorithm. So with that being said, are there a universal best practice for this? I'll leave the discussion of XOR swapping for another question. I read about it here if you're interested: graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 15:33

... universal solution ...

The solution is to write something like qsort(): all functions that need to know the size of individual values are passed to your own function with pointers to void all over

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <wchar.h>

void universalReverseArray(void *arr, size_t siz,
                           size_t (*arrlen)(void*),
                           void (*swap)(void*, void*))
{
  size_t elems = arrlen(arr);
  size_t i = 0;
  size_t m = elems >> 1;
  unsigned char *p = arr;

  while(i < m) {
    swap(p + i * siz, p + (elems - 1) * siz);
    i++;
    elems--;
  }
}

void cswap(void *a, void *b) {
  char *aa = a, *bb = b;
  char t = *aa;
  *aa = *bb;
  *bb = t;
}

void dswap(void *a, void *b) {
  double *aa = a, *bb = b;
  double t = *aa;
  *aa = *bb;
  *bb = t;
}

void wswap(void *a, void *b) {
  wchar_t *aa = a, *bb = b;
  wchar_t t = *aa;
  *aa = *bb;
  *bb = t;
}

size_t clen(void *arr) {
  char *aa = arr;
  size_t retval = 0;
  while (*aa) {
    retval += 1;
    aa += 1;
  }
  return retval;
}

size_t dlen(void *arr) {
  double *aa = arr;
  size_t retval = 0;
  while (fabs(*aa) >= 0.0001) {
    retval += 1;
    aa += 1;
  }
  return retval;
}

size_t wlen(void *arr) {
  wchar_t *aa = arr;
  size_t retval = 0;
  while (*aa) {
    retval += 1;
    aa += 1;
  }
  return retval;
}

int main(void) {
  double x[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0};
  char y[] = "foobar";
  wchar_t z[4];
  z[0] = 'a'; z[1] = 'b'; z[2] = 'c'; z[3] = 0;

  for (int k=0; k<5; k++) {printf("%f ", x[k]);}
  printf("%s ", y);
  printf("%ls\n", z);

  universalReverseArray(x, sizeof *x, dlen, dswap);
  universalReverseArray(y, sizeof *y, clen, cswap);
  universalReverseArray(z, sizeof *z, wlen, wswap);

  for (int k=0; k<5; k++) {printf("%f ", x[k]);}
  printf("%s ", y);
  printf("%ls\n", z);

  return 0;
}

You can see it "running" on ideone: http://ideone.com/t1iOg

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This makes a lot of sense and was something in the fields of what I was thinking of that could solve my problem. How is this solutions in terms of performance compared to Dietrich's answer? –  rzetterberg Jun 17 '11 at 19:30
    
Dietrich's answer probably generates faster code (you need to measure to be certain). But it creates several "reversal" functions, not 1 universal function :) –  pmg Jun 17 '11 at 19:38
    
I almost like this! But isn't this basically equivalent to the OP's existing mechanism, except that the different special cases now live in separate functions rather than a big if-else? The same amount of code needs to be written and maintained either way (give or take). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 17 '11 at 20:20
    
@Oli: if you pass the element size to the swap functions, you can write it to swap values of any type: universalSwap(size_t siz, void *a, void *b);. The len functions can't be 'universalized' though. –  pmg Jun 17 '11 at 20:53

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