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Other than turning warnings off.. what can I do in my code to get rid of this error:

warning: filesize() [function.filesize] stat failed for ....  on line 152

The code is:

$store_filesize = filesize($file->filepath);
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and what is $file->filepath? –  Neal Jun 17 '11 at 16:22
    
null sometimes but other times it's the file path –  Shamoon Jun 17 '11 at 16:23
    
if it is null thats when youll get the warning. –  Neal Jun 17 '11 at 16:23
    
U can add if($file->filepath != null) –  skowron-line Jun 17 '11 at 16:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if this is what you want (e.g. I'm not clear if you want to work out why it's happening and work around it) but if you are just looking to suppress errors you can usually use @ in front of the function name.

e.g.

$store_filesize = @filesize($file->filepath);
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2  
This suppresses the error, but does not address the underlying problem. Bad practice. –  Chris Jun 17 '11 at 16:26
2  
I think addressed that in my answer, the OP didn't say why. It's not always bad practice, that really depends on if it's appropriate to do so. I wouldn't assume checking with is_readable() is a suitable way of suppressing all errors though. –  Iain Collins Jun 17 '11 at 16:43
    
It is always bad practice. There are language constructs to deal with errors more gracefully, including try...catch and set_error_handler. PHP dynamically changes error_reporting to 0 before executing the suppressed statement, then changes it back, even if there is no error. Why pay process time to get less information about failures in your code? Why pay processor time to suppress errors that don't exist? Good practice dictates that you write the trivial code necessary to actually deal with or prevent an error rather than simply ignoring them. One should never use @ in PHP. Ever. –  Chris Jul 15 '13 at 18:44
    
@Chris Not everything that fails throws an exception, and not everything that fails is of consequence, sometimes it's just a nice-to-have. Wrapping try/catch with nothing isn't a better pragma (and is not free - worse if the service fails often). –  Iain Collins Jul 17 '13 at 21:55
    
NB: I certainly don't generally encourage people to use @ - and use it exceptionally rarely myself - but everything is context dependant. Encouraging people to write empty try/catch blocks has consequences too (worse, I would argue). –  Iain Collins Jul 17 '13 at 22:02
$store_filesize = @filesize($file->filepath);
if ($store_filesize === FALSE) {
  throw new \Exception('filesize failed');
}
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Don't call filesize unless the file actually exists:

$store_filesize = is_file($file->filepath) ? filesize($file->filepath) : 0;

Docs for is_file: http://php.net/manual/en/function.is-file.php

:)

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1  
You can call filesize if you have permissions for the containing directory. is_readable checks permissions for the file itself, so you're returning 0 although you could get more information in some cases. Also, this introduces a race condition - if the file is deleted just before filesize, the function will still fail. –  phihag Jun 17 '11 at 16:29
1  
filesize won't throw an exception, will it? Therefore, your code change has no effect. Also, if wrapping in try..catch would work, couldn't you skip the is_file check then? –  phihag Jun 17 '11 at 16:43

Check if the file exists, is file and is readable

if (is_readable($file->filepath)) {
    $store_filesize = filesize($file->filepath);
}
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2  
This suffers from a race condition where the file is deleted after the is_readable call. Moreover, you can have permissions to get the file size, but not read the file, so this code arbitrarily does not get the file size of some files. –  phihag Jun 17 '11 at 16:28

Remember to check for null:

if($file->filepath != null){
   $store_filesize = filesize($file->filepath);
}
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