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I have an ajax call returning various database fields one-by-one in a for loop. I'm able to test if the field is HTML by using:

for(i = 0; i < copyFromSchedule.length; i++) {
    temporaryString = $(this).attr("ows_"+copyFromSchedule[i]);
    if ($(temporaryString).html() == null)
        // Is not HTML...
    else
        // Is HTML, remove any anchors found in this string (<a name="XXX"></a>)
        $(temporaryString).find("a[name]").remove();
}

In the else statement (when the string is HTML), I'm trying to (unsuccessfully) remove all HTML anchors using the function above.

How do I manipulate the object as HTML through jQuery?

Update

On further inspection, I've realized the problem is different from what I initially thought.

My issue is I'm not able to manipulate the variable (temporaryString) as a jQuery object. For example, the following will not affect the html of the object:

$(temporaryString).find("div").remove();

So, in theory if I have the following:

temporaryString = "<span>Span Content</span><div>DIV Content</div>";
$(temporaryString).find("div").remove();

I would assume 'temporaryString' should now equal:

<span>Span Content</span>

since the div is removed.

Is my logic wrong? It doesn't seem to be working.

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there is no such thing as an else loop –  Neal Jun 17 '11 at 16:27
    
@Neal, just a typo. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Eric Di Bari Jun 17 '11 at 16:37
    
its ok ^_^ it happens to the best of us –  Neal Jun 17 '11 at 16:39
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's your problem: In Javascript, strings are immutable, that means that they can't be changed. Unless you assign something different to the variable temporaryString, that variable isn't going to change.

When you run this code:

temporaryString = "<span>Span Content</span><div>DIV Content</div>";
$(temporaryString).find("div").remove();

This is what happens:

  1. "<span>Span Content</span><div>DIV Content</div>" is assigned to temporaryString
  2. $(temporaryString) runs, parsing temporaryString and creating a corresponding array-like object (the jQuery object) of html elements and returns it. temporaryString is left unchanged.
  3. .find("div") runs, finds all div elements in the result of the above step and returns them. temporaryString is left unchanged.
  4. .remove() runs, removing the elements returned by the previous step from the jQuery object. temporaryString is left unchanged.
  5. The objects and elements created by $(temporaryString).find("div").remove() pass out of scope and are deleted by the garbage collector. temporaryString has still not been changed.

In short, if you don't do anything with the result of $(temporaryString).find("div").remove(), nothing happens.

If you want temporaryString to become "<span>Span Content</span>", you need to assign the result of all the manipulations you've done to the jQuery object back into the temporaryString variable. The best way to do this is to create a div element, set it's contents to temporaryString, remove the desired elements, and assign the new contents of the div element back into temporaryString like this:

temporaryString = $("<div>").html(temporaryString).find("div").remove().end().html();

For your original question, you can try this:

for(i = 0; i < copyFromSchedule.length; i++) {
    temporaryString = $(this).attr("ows_"+copyFromSchedule[i]);
    if ($(temporaryString).html() == null)
        { /* Is not HTML... */ }
    else {
        // Is HTML, remove any anchors found in this string (<a name="XXX"></a>)
        temporaryString = $("<div>").html(temporaryString).find("a[name]").remove().end().html()
    }
}

Sorry for the long winded answer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, for your detailed explanation –  didxga Jun 17 '11 at 18:34
    
Thanks for the detailed response. I figured the issue related to a non-changeable factor in the variable, and wound up creating a (much less elegant) solution. –  Eric Di Bari Jun 17 '11 at 21:03
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I find it easiest to add an string "HTML" to a wrapper element before testing with JQuery:

$('<div>').html(temporaryString).find('a[name]').remove();
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IF I understand correctly:

if ($(temporaryString).html() == null) {
    // Is not HTML...
}
else {
    $('a', temporaryString).remove(); //remove all anchor tags
}
share|improve this answer
    
I updated the code above: the 'else' statement includes the function to remove any anchors from the code. The idea is that I'm cleaning up the HTML. –  Eric Di Bari Jun 17 '11 at 16:31
    
@Eric, see my update –  Neal Jun 17 '11 at 16:32
    
As I understand it, OP doesn't want to remove all HTML. Just HTML Anchors (<a name="top"></a>) –  Kyle Trauberman Jun 17 '11 at 16:32
    
@Kyle, see my update –  Neal Jun 17 '11 at 16:33
    
That works for all <a> tags (including hyperlinks, which I don't think the OP wants to remove. Correct me if I'm wrong Eric.) –  Kyle Trauberman Jun 17 '11 at 16:34
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i think you should be doing this instead if all you want is just anchors.

$(temporaryString).find("a").remove();

but the thing is, what's in the temporarystring? if it's just text then i think the easiest way is to use a hidden div and paste the html there and call the div to process using jquery.

i.e.

$("#hiddenDivId").html(myHtmlChunk);
$("#hiddenDivId").find("a").remove();

//then do whatever u want with the html and clear the hidden div
$("#hiddenDivId").html("");
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Wrap up your temporaryString with some markup(ideally div with ad hoc id), then refer it as an jQuery DOM, you can then remove element within it.

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