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Hard to think of a title for this one! I have a bean that is initialized in a spring container. It loads classes that also create objects from files using Spring classloaders. Some of these objects may have dependencies on expensive objects and I would like those objects to be initialized in the parent. Okay I can't explain in words so on to a simplified example:

public class MainLoader {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        XmlBeanFactory beanFactory = new XmlBeanFactory(new ClassPathResource("top-context.xml"));

        ChildLoader childLoader = (ChildLoader)beanFactory.getBean("childLoader");

        childLoader.loadChildAndDoSomething("message1.xml");
        childLoader.loadChildAndDoSomething("message2.xml");        
    }
}

public class ChildLoader {

    public void loadChildAndDoSomething(String childContextfile){       
        XmlBeanFactory beanFactory = new XmlBeanFactory(new ClassPathResource(childContextfile));
        ClassThatDoesStuff classThatDoesStuff = (ClassThatDoesStuff)beanFactory.getBean("classThatDoesStuff");  
        classThatDoesStuff.saySomething();
    }

}

public class ClassThatDoesStuff {
private ReallyExpensiveService reallyExpensiveService;  
private String messageStart;

public void saySomething(){
    System.out.println(messageStart + reallyExpensiveService.getName());
}

    // .. field setters removed for brevity
}

public class ReallyExpensiveService {
public String getName(){
    return "Joe";
}
}

These have the following beans in the files:

top-context.xml:

<bean id="childLoader" class="com.mark.test.ChildLoader" />

message1.xml (message2.xml is similar):

<bean id="classThatDoesStuff" class="com.mark.test.ClassThatDoesStuff">
    <property name="messageStart" value = "Hello! " />  
    <property name ="reallyExpensiveService" ref="theExpensiveserviceReference" />  
</bean>
<bean id="theExpensiveserviceReference" class="com.mark.test.ReallyExpensiveService" />

When these are run you get the expected:

Hello! Joe
Goodbye! Joe

The only problem here is that the "ReallyExpensiveService" is getting created and cached by Spring on each occasion. This is verified by the log. Better to load up any services that might be needed by the "ClassThatDoesStuff" classes (imagine it's an interface) when the MainLoader is initialzed. I.e. (conceptually) change the spring context files to:

top-context.xml:

<bean id="childLoader" class="com.mark.test.ChildLoader" />
<bean id="theExpensiveserviceReference" class="com.mark.test.ReallyExpensiveService" />

message1/2.xml

    <bean id="classThatDoesStuff" class="com.mark.test.ClassThatDoesStuff"
  autoWired="byType">   
        <property name="messageStart" value = "Hello! " />  
    </bean>

I realise that the way out of this would be to have the ClassThatDoeStuff have a setter for the service and set the value from the Child container which itself had it injected via the main context. But imagine that there are arbitrary services and each of the ClassThatDoesStuff implementers used different ones.. Is there any way for this to work in Spring..?

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1  
I don't think there's any way to make independent bean factories aware of their respective beans. You're suggestion to have the main context control this resolution is probably the most reasonably way of doing this. The more obvious question is, of course, why do you need to load up several bean factories? –  Filip Jun 17 '11 at 16:32
    
Thanks Flip - I know it's weird - the ChildLoader is an object that's fitting into an existing (big) framework that already uses spring for it's wiring. The child loader has to load up and instantiate business objects from spring config files (to execute a sequence of operations). –  Mark D Jun 17 '11 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems like the best you can hope for is to instantiate each ReallyExpensiveService one time. (You mention in there that you're not sure which ClassThatDoesStuff may use a different one.) I would probably try to define all of my ReallyExpensiveService beans in the top level context and then hand them out to the classes that use them wherever it's appropriate, either through the XML configuration files that you're using or through some kind of factory that you inject into the ClassThatDoesStuff beans.

You might also try to look for a way to defer the expensive operations of starting up ReallyExpensiveService until you're sure they're going to be used. Of course this depends on what "expensive" means. Is it that the services use too much memory and you don't want them around if they're not in use or that they take too long to instantiate?

In any case, the key here is to have as few instances of expensive things floating around as possible, so you'll want to configure them at the top level so that the references to the single instances can be passed around anywhere.

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thanks Rafe - that's my own thinking - I'll mark it as an answer if nobody comes up with anything better.. I would have thought there was a way! –  Mark D Jun 17 '11 at 16:47

I fiddled around a lot with this and learnt a lot about spring in the process. I don't think it's possible to get the parent spring context to apply these properties dynamically. I got around the problem by implementing caching in the mainloader object so that expensive types aren't created multiple times frmo the spring definition.

The other possiblity I investigated was making the ChildLoader context aware and allowing the ClassThatDoesStuff to use the parent context to get handles on beans, but this was bedding in spring to the app too much for my liking.

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