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Many threads may populate a HashMap, in some cases I need to wait (block) until an object exists in the HashMap, such as:

BlockingConcurrentHashMap map = new BlockingConcurrentHashMap();
Object x = map.getAndWait(key, 1000);    //(object_to_get, max_delay_ms)

Wondering if such a thing exists already, I hate re-inventing wheels.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as I know, there is no 'Transfer Map' available. Though the creation of one in theory isn't too difficult.

public class TransferMap<K,V> implements Map<K,V>{
  @GuardedBy("lock")
  private final HashMap<K,V> backingMap = new HashMap<K,V>();

  private final Object lock = new Object();
  public V getAndWait(Object key){
     synchronized(lock){
       V value = null;
         do{
            value = backingMap.get(key);

            if(value == null) lock.wait();

         }while(value == null); 
      }
      return value;
     }
   public V put(K key, V value){
      synchronized(lock){
         V value = backingMap.put(key,value);
         lock.notifyAll();
      }
     return value;
   }
  }

There are obvious exclusions in this class. Not to mentioned the lock coarsening; needless to say it won't perform great, but you should get the idea of what is going on

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Same question as in irreputable's answer: Synchronizing around put(key,val) makes sense, I can see many implementation options for improving performance if needed (though this case doesn't have a performance concern). But question is: can I count on put(key,val) always being called for every put operation? There are 3 put method: put(k,v), putaAll(colection), and putIfAbsent(k,v). –  David Parks Jun 18 '11 at 1:44

I'm not sure what your question is. Do you want to wait for the value when it is not in the map? You want the producer-consumer pattern of BlockingQueue on a map. If it is that I don't know anything similar in the JRE or anywhere else.

Google guava MapMaker allows you to make a computing map, that is a Map that creates the value if it does not exist by using a factory with type Function<Key, Value>. If several threads reach that situation at the same time one creates the value and the rest blocks waiting for it. I know it's not producer-consumer but is what I can offer.

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Mmm... the computing Map might be a good start actually, in that the Function could simply encapsulate blocking until the key is present in the map. That's a relatively nice way to separate out the "blocking" aspect from the "Map" aspect and also allows multiple strategies quite simply (e.g. spinning vs. sleeping vs. wait-notifyAll vs. ...) –  Andrzej Doyle Jun 17 '11 at 17:13
    
I disagree, Andrzej. It's an alternative, not a good start. The thread that reach the function must return a value, it can't wait for a timeout, nor can the rest of the readers. –  user270349 Jun 17 '11 at 23:10
    
Thanks for the idea, I'll look at it. And, yes, I need to wait for a specified period of time (or indefinitely) until a specified key exists in the map, then continue as a normal get(key) operation. –  David Parks Jun 18 '11 at 1:49

Improvement on John's impl, with aimed notify(), instead of "thundering herd", which is especially bad when nobody is waiting on an inserted key

HashMap<K,Object> locks = new HashMap<>();

put(key, value)
    synchronized(locks)
        backingMap.put(key,value);

        lock = locks.get(key);
        if(lock!=null)
            lock.notifyAll();

getAndWait(key)
    // not hard, but pretty verbose
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+1 I like the thundering herd reference. That's a new term to me :) –  John Vint Jun 17 '11 at 18:01
    
it's such a vivid term that you'll never forget once you heard it. –  irreputable Jun 17 '11 at 19:00
    
I agree and absolutely appropriate to the situation its describing –  John Vint Jun 17 '11 at 19:20
    
Synchronizing around put(key,val) makes sense, I can see many implementation options for improving performance if needed (though this case doesn't have a performance concern). But question is: can I count on put(key,val) always being called for every put operation? There are 3 put method: put(k,v), putaAll(colection), and putIfAbsent(k,v). –  David Parks Jun 18 '11 at 1:43

You can populate your Hashtable with java.util.concurrent.FutureTask<ObjReturned>s at the start with all the tasks you need to compute. You then use a thread pool to start executing your FutureTasks. You can get your results asynchronously with ObjReturned obj = hashtable.get(key).get(), which will wait if the FutureTask in question is not done yet.

You probably don't want one single thread to retrieve the results since it might wait on the task that will turn out to finish last. You could have multiple retrieval threads, or you could cycle through the keys when you wait too long for one task (there is a method FutureTask.get(waitTime, timeUnit)).

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Blockingmap4j will suit your requirement just right.
You can find it at http://sourceforge.net/projects/blockingmapforj/
Since granular locks are used in the implementation, performance will not be severely degraded.

PS
This is a rather late answer on a question that is 2 years old. Since, there is no way to send a private message to the author of the question, am replying here.

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2  
You should add a disclaimer saying that you are the author of that library. –  assylias May 3 '13 at 9:28
    
@assylias - no, that's not necessary. It's a link to an open source project, so hardly a conflict of interest. The question appears to have requested existing solutions. If you have technical concern with this solution, post it - otherwise it doesn't really matter who suggested it. –  Chris Stratton May 5 '13 at 16:04
1  
@ChrisStratton For the record I had upvoted the answer and yes, stackoverflow's guidelines say that the user should disclaim his affiliation. –  assylias May 5 '13 at 20:33

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