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I have a bunch of classes such as:

abstract class Product {
  BigDecimal price
  String name
}

class EdibleProduct extends Product {
  Date sellByDate
}

class FinancialProduct extends Product {
  Currency currency
}

In reality there are more than 2 subclasses, and each subclass will add more than one property to the parent. I would like to use these classes with an API such as:

interface ProductDao {    

  Product create(Product product)
  Product update(Product product)
}

With the naive model proposed above, one would need to do something like this within the implementation of the ProductDao methods

Product create(Product product) {
  // save the fields common to all Products

  if (product instanceof EdibleProduct) {
    // save fields specific to this implementation      

  } else if (product instanceof FinancialProduct) {
    // save fields specific to this implementation      
  }
}

Obviously, casting to the implementation type like this sucks, so I'm looking for ways to create, update, etc. different kinds of products without referring to implementation types (in the ProductDao implementation at least).

I've considered various solutions, most of which involve removing the subclasses and moving the product-specific fields into separate classes that all implement the same interface, something like

interface ProductType {}

class EdibleProductType {
  Date sellByDate
}

class FinancialProductType {
  Currency currency
}

then adding a ProductType field to the Product. I've also considered using a decorator, but it seems that wouldn't avoid the need to downcast.

The implementation language will be either Java or Groovy.

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4 Answers 4

If ProductDao.create is just copying its argument, add a new method to the interface of Product like

public Product createCopy();

and then within each concrete class, it will know how to make a copy of itself with, for example, a copy constructor. So for EdibleProduct you might have:

public Product createCopy() {
   return new EdibleProduct(this);
}

public EdibleProduct(EdibleProduct rhs) {
   // copy construct
}
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If you cannot use Dave's answer (because it would be problematic to put the code in Product itself), you might want to look at the Visitor Pattern, which was developed for precisely this type of problem.

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1  
As i understand Visitor, you still need acceptVisitor() in the Product. Can you please provide code snippet that supports your idea? –  Op De Cirkel Jun 19 '11 at 14:21
    
@Op De Cirkel Yes, you would still need to modify Product, but you won't have to put database code into Product. –  Kathy Van Stone Jun 20 '11 at 20:36

What you want is the Chain of Reponsibilty Pattern. Have instances of each subtype of Product in a Set and just walk the Set and call .create(final Product p); on each one, they will decided if the type is the correct one, and do what they need to do. This eleminates the nasty if/elseif construct and scales out to lots and lots of subclasses.

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It appears, and I'm assuming that the version of Java/Groovy that you're using can do this, that you need an interface that you can polymorph into either of these objects.

In other words have an IProduct and just use it, using a dynamic type, which will then at run time be able to act based on what it has from a properties perspective.

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