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I am amazed to see that oracle does not have "auto number" data type. Is there any way to use auto number data type as we have this data type in MS access?

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marked as duplicate by ChrisF Apr 5 '13 at 23:28

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Most of the bigger RDBMS's don't have a data type known as "auto number". Mainly because an auto number is usually an int. In SQL Server you do something else to automatically incriment the number rather than setting its data type to the magical "auto number". –  Jamie Dixon Jun 17 '11 at 17:50
    
A sequence is FAR more flexible/powerful/scalable than an autonumber –  Stephanie Page Jun 17 '11 at 19:02
    
Sequences are thankfully now ANSI. SQL Server "Denali" will finally support what Oracle, PostgreSQL, and DB2 have. –  OMG Ponies Jun 18 '11 at 1:39
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This blog post describes an option for this functionality.

Key elements are quoted below, but the post goes into more depth.

create sequence test_seq 
start with 1 
increment by 1 
nomaxvalue;

Followed by

insert into test values(test_seq.nextval, 'voila!');

OR

create trigger test_trigger
before insert on test
for each row
begin
select test_seq.nextval into :new.id from dual;
end;
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Your provided link is not opening. –  Adnan Jun 17 '11 at 18:07
    
link opens for me and discusses sequences (implemented via triggers and such) –  Harrison Jun 17 '11 at 18:08
    
It also works for me; updating answer to include quotes. –  Michael Lowman Jun 17 '11 at 18:11
    
WFFM <-- Works fine for me. –  Stephanie Page Jun 17 '11 at 19:06
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In oracle you use a Sequence. You can have any number of sequences, and use any of them to assign a unique number to any field in any table or just call on one to assign a number to a variable.

SQL> CREATE SEQUENCE demo_seq INCREMENT BY 1 MAXVALUE 999999999999999999999999999 MINVALUE 0 NOCACHE;

Sequence created.

SQL> select demo_seq.nextval from dual;
   NEXTVAL                                                                      
----------                                                                      
         0  

SQL> select demo_seq.nextval from dual;

   NEXTVAL                                                                      
----------                                                                      
         1   

SQL> select demo_seq.nextval from dual;
   NEXTVAL                                                                      
----------                                                                      
         2   

SQL> select demo_seq.currval from dual;
   CURRVAL                                                                      
----------                                                                      
         2   

References:

http://www.techonthenet.com/oracle/sequences.php

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/statements_6015.htm

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why not nomaxvalue? –  Michael Lowman Jun 17 '11 at 19:04
    
NOMAXVALUE makes more sense in my particular example but I wanted to show that this parameter existed (if a reader decided not to follow my links) so it can be used for whatever purpose necessary. –  Joel Slowik Jun 17 '11 at 19:42
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