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I've used the following script to see if a file exists:

#!/bin/bash
FILE=$1

if [ -f $FILE ];
then
   echo "File $FILE exists."
else
   echo "File $FILE does not exist."
fi

What's the correct syntax to use if I only want to check if the file does not exist?

#!/bin/bash
FILE=$1

if [ $FILE does not exist ];
then
   echo "File $FILE does not exist."
fi
share|improve this question
11  
I've found this list of bash conditional statements very useful. –  frgtn Mar 12 '09 at 14:52
1  
Being the very lazy person that I am, I would typically have used the following silly workaround construct: if [ -f $FILE ]; then; else; echo "File $FILE does not exist."; fi; Probably good that I found this question instead and learned to do it in a more proper way. :) –  Alderath Jan 15 '13 at 13:35
    
To be pendantic, you should say "regular file", as most UNIX/POSIX docs refer generically to all types of file system entries a simply "files", e.g., a symbolic link is a type of a file, as is a named pipe, regular file, directory, block special, character special, socket, etc. –  kevinarpe Nov 9 '13 at 8:51

13 Answers 13

up vote 1128 down vote accepted

The test command ([ here) has a "not" logical operator which is the exclamation point (similar to many other languages). Try this:

if [ ! -f /tmp/foo.txt ]; then
    echo "File not found!"
fi
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107  
More succinctly: [ ! -f /tmp/foo.txt ] && echo "File not found!" –  DavidWinterbottom Sep 29 '10 at 12:09
3  
I struggled a bit to find the right syntax for "if any of 2 files does not exist". The following both work: if [ ! \( -f "f1" -a -f "f2" \) ] ; then echo MISSING; fi if [ ! -f "f1" ] || [ ! -f "f2" ] ; then echo MISSING; fi –  mivk Feb 2 '12 at 15:41
7  
@JuanMendes: That trailing semicolon is unnecessary when there's a newline as shown. It's only needed if you have the then on the same line as the if. –  Dennis Williamson May 27 '12 at 2:14
3  
You're not using the "shell logical not" here. You're using the "test logical not". The shell's would be if ! [ -f /tmp/foo.tst ] ... –  Jens May 15 '13 at 9:21
13  
@DavidWinterbottom Even more succulently: [ -f /tmp/foo.txt ] || echo "File not found!" –  David W. Jun 26 '13 at 21:08

You can negate an expression with "!":

#!/bin/bash
FILE=$1

if [ ! -f "$FILE" ]
then
    echo "File $FILE does not exists"
fi

The relevant manpage is man test or, equivalently, man [ -- or help test or help [ for the built-in bash command.

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2  
In bash, [ is a builtin. So the relevant information is rather obtained by help [... but this shows that [ is a synonym for the test builtin, hence the relevant information is rather obtained by help test. See also the Bash Conditional Expression section in the manual. –  gniourf_gniourf Jun 29 '13 at 10:05
    
@gniourf_gniourf: Yes, but the bash built-in [ command behaves very similarly to the external [ command, so either man test or man [ will give you a good idea of how it works. –  Keith Thompson Sep 21 '13 at 19:04
    
@KeithThompson except that the bash builtin [ has more switches than the external command [ found on my system... Generally speaking I believe it's better to read the documentation specific to a given tool, and not the documentation specific to another vaguely related one. I might be wrong, though ;) –  gniourf_gniourf Sep 21 '13 at 21:54
if [[ ! -a $FILE ]]; then
    echo "$FILE does not exist!"
fi

Also, it's possible that the file is a broken symbolic link, or a non-regular file, like e.g. a socket, device or fifo. If you want to catch that you should:

if [[ ! -a $FILE ]]; then
    if [[ -L $FILE ]]; then
        echo "$FILE is a broken symlink!"
    else
        echo "$FILE does not exist!"
    fi
fi
share|improve this answer
3  
May I ask why the two "["s in the test? (eg [[ ! -a $FILE ]]). I tried all the options mentioned on a solaris box and only that one worked, so grateful, but why? –  dimitris mistriotis Apr 20 '11 at 8:35
15  
Double brackets are a "modern" extension; eg they won't do word splitting (such as for filenames with spaces) and still work for empty strings: mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/031 –  bw1024 Feb 14 '12 at 23:40
5  
according to tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/fto.html -a is identical in effect to -e. It has been "deprecated," and its use is discouraged. Anyhow +1 for mentioning to check on broken symlink too –  Luca Borrione Sep 1 '12 at 20:55
3  
@dimitrismistriotis two "[" is a non-portable extension implemented (differently) by zsh & bash; generally you should avoid it if at all possible. –  Good Person Oct 26 '12 at 15:41
1  
shouldn't $FILE be quoted out to prevent spaces problems? –  CharlesB Feb 26 '13 at 16:24

It's worth mentioning that if you need to execute a single command you can abbreviate

if [ ! -f $file ]; then echo $file;fi

to

test -f $file || echo $file

or

[ -f "$file" ] || echo $file
share|improve this answer

Bash File Testing
-b filename - Block special file
-c filename - Special character file
-d directoryname - Check for directory existence
-e filename - Check for file existence
-f filename - Check for regular file existence not a directory
-G filename - Check if file exists and is owned by effective group ID.
-g filename - true if file exists and is set-group-id.
-k filename - Sticky bit
-L filename - Symbolic link
-O filename - True if file exists and is owned by the effective user id.
-r filename - Check if file is a readable
-S filename - Check if file is socket
-s filename - Check if file is nonzero size
-u filename - Check if file set-user-id bit is set
-w filename - Check if file is writable
-x filename - Check if file is executable

How to use

#!/bin/bash
file="./file"
if [ -e $file ]; then
    echo "File exists"
else 
    echo "File does not exist"
fi 

An if-condition can also be negated by using !

#!/bin/bash
file="./file"
if [ ! -e $file ]; then
    echo "File does not exist"
else 
    echo "File exists"
fi 
share|improve this answer
    
consider adding -n –  0x90 May 4 at 8:16
    
@0x90 If you want, you are free to edit my post and add it to the list. I guess you mean: -n String - Check if the length of the string isn't zero. Or do you mean file1 -nt file2 - Check if file1 is newer then file 2 (you can also use -ot for older then) –  GroundZero May 5 at 10:59
    
About -n: The unary operator -z tests for a null string, while -n or no operator at all returns True if a string is not empty. ~ ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-bash-test/index.html –  GroundZero May 5 at 11:06

I prefer to do this one liner, in POSIX shell compatible format,

$ [ -f "/$DIR/$FILE" ] || echo "$FILE NOT FOUND"

$ [ -f "/$DIR/$FILE" ] && echo "$FILE FOUND"

For a couple commands, like I would do in a script.

$  [ -f "/$DIR/$FILE" ] || { echo "$FILE NOT FOUND" ; exit 1 ;}

Once I started doing this, rarely use the fully typed syntax!!

share|improve this answer
    
First of all, unquoted variable references are error-prone. That said, where does it say in any bash manpage that the [ or test built-in would test for file existence of the argument by default (as opposed to -e)? Would that not be ambiguous? AFAIK (and AIUI the section "CONDITIONAL EXPRESSIONS") the only thing that is tested with your approach is that the argument is not empty (or undefined), which is, in this case, a tautology (let $DIR = '' and $FILE = '', then the argument is still '//'). –  PointedEars Nov 9 '12 at 2:59
    
Proof: ls /foo, result ls: cannot access /foo: No such file or directory. [ /foo ] && echo 42, result 42. GNU bash, version 4.2.37(1)-release (i486-pc-linux-gnu). –  PointedEars Nov 9 '12 at 3:05
    
@PointedEars: I failed to specify the -f option, at the moment I wrote this answer. Obviously you could always use -e, if your not sure it will be a regular file. Additionally In all my scripts I quote these constructs, I must have just submitted this without adequate proofing. –  TechZilla Nov 17 '12 at 23:42
    
ACK. But you probably know that a one-liner cannot solve the if-else problem: [ $condition ] && if_true || if_false is error-prone. In any event, I find [ ! -f "$file" ] && if_not_exists easier to read and understand than [ -f "$file" ] || if_not_exists. –  PointedEars Nov 18 '12 at 1:33

You should be careful about running test for unquoted variable, because it might produce unexpected results:

$ [ -f ]
$ echo $?
0
$ [ -f "" ]
$ echo $?
1

The recommendation is usually to have the tested variable surrounded by double quotation marks:

#!/bin/sh
FILE=$1

if [ ! -f "$FILE" ]
then
   echo "File $FILE does not exist."
fi
share|improve this answer
1  
The recommendation is to have every variable surrounded by double quotation marks, unless you know exactly that you have one of the rare cases where it's unnecessary, or one of the even rarer cases where it's harmful. (And no, this is not one of them.) –  Uwe May 28 '13 at 11:43
    
Would you care to elaborate why this is not the case to use double quotation mark? Otherwise I don't see the usefulness in the comment. –  artdanil May 28 '13 at 23:29
1  
I meant: This is not one of the rare cases where it's unnecessary or harmful. A shell programmer should get used to enclose (almost) every variable in double quotes; this rule is not limited to [ ... ]. –  Uwe May 29 '13 at 9:03

To reverse a test, use "!". That is equivalent to the "not" logical operator in other languages. Try this:

if [ ! -f /tmp/foo.txt ];
then
    echo "File not found!"
fi

Or written in a slightly different way:

if [ ! -f /tmp/foo.txt ]
    then echo "File not found!"
fi

Or you could use:

if ! [ -f /tmp/foo.txt ]
    then echo "File not found!"
fi

Or, presing all together:

if ! [ -f /tmp/foo.txt ]; then echo "File not found!"; fi

Which may be written (using then "and" operator: &&) as:

[ ! -f /tmp/foo.txt ] && echo "File not found!"

Which looks shorter like this:

[ -f /tmp/foo.txt ] || echo "File not found!"
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To test file existence, Parameter can be any one of the following:

-e: Returns true value, if file exists

-f: Return true value, if file exists and regular file

-r: Return true value, if file exists and is readable

-w: Return true value, if file exists and is writable

-x: Return true value, if file exists and is executable

-d: Return true value, if exists and is a directory

example script,

#!/bin/bash
FILE=$1

if [ -f $FILE ];
then
   echo "File $FILE exists"
else
   echo "File $FILE does not exists"
fi
share|improve this answer

The test thing may count too. It worked for me (based on Bash Shell: Check File Exists or Not):

test -e FILENAME && echo "File exists" || echo "File doesn't exist"
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A nice clean function for this stuff is best, i created a crazy redundant example over here... http://stackoverflow.com/a/20463366/2083509

check-file(){
    while [[ ${#} -gt 0 ]]; do
        case $1 in
           fxrsw) [[ -f "$2" && -x "$2" && -r "$2" && -s "$2" && -w "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
            fxrs) [[ -f "$2" && -x "$2" && -r "$2" && -s "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
             fxr) [[ -f "$2" && -x "$2" && -r "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
              fr) [[ -f "$2" && -r "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
              fx) [[ -f "$2" && -x "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
              fe) [[ -f "$2" && -e "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
              hf) [[ -h "$2" && -f "$2" ]] || return 1 ;;
               *) [[ -e "$1" ]] || return 1 ;;
        esac
        shift
    done
    return 0
}
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The simplest way

FILE=$1
[ ! -e ${FILE} ] && echo "doest not exist" || echo "exist"
share|improve this answer

this shell also work for find file in dir

echo "entre file"

read a

if [ -s /home/trainee02/simmant/$a ] 

then 

echo "yes file is there " 

else 

echo "soryy file is not there" 

fi
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protected by Elenasys Dec 19 '13 at 21:39

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