Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Out of professional curiosity, what is the safest / fastest / most efficient way to compare two fully numeric strings in C?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void){

char str1[5] = "123";
char str2[5] = "123";
char *ptr;

if(atoi(str1) == atoi(str2))
    printf("Equal strings");

if(strtol(str1,&ptr,10) == strtol(str2,&ptr,10))
    printf("Equal strings");

if(strcmp(str1,str2)==0)
    printf("Equal strings");

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

strcmp () in my opinion, as it does not need any numeric conversions. But in this case you need to make sure that one of them stores a string which contains only numeric characters.

Also you can do memcmp () on the string

EDIT1

As pointed out by others about the leading zeros, you can manually scan through the leading zeros and call strcmp () or memcmp () by passing a pointer to the first non-zero digit.

EDIT2

The below code tells what i am trying to say. This is only for integers, not for floating point numbers.

int main (void)
{
  char s1[128], s2[128];
  char *p1 = s1, *p2 = s2;

  /* populate s1, s2 */

  while (*p1 && (*p1 == '0'))
    p1++;

  while (*p2 && (*p2 == '0'))
    p2++;

  if (strcmp (p1, p2) == 0)
    printf ("\nEqual");
  else
    printf ("\nNot equal");

  printf ("\n");
  return 0;
}

For floating point numbers, the trailing zeros after the decimal point should be chopped out manually.

Or do the whole stuff manually.

EDIT4

I would also like you to have a look at this code for floating point. This will detect leading zeros before the decimal and trailing zeros after the decimal. For example

00000000000001.10000000000000 and 1.1 will be Equal for the below code

int main (void)
{
  char s1[128], s2[128];
  char *p1, *p2, *p1b, *p2b;

  printf ("\nEnter 1: ");
  scanf ("%s", s1);
  printf ("\nEnter 2: ");
  scanf ("%s", s2);

  p1 = s1;
  p2 = s2;
  /* used for counting backwards to trim trailing zeros
   * in case of floating point
   */
  p1b = s1 + strlen (s1) - 1;
  p2b = s2 + strlen (s2) - 1;


  /* Eliminate Leading Zeros */
  while (*p1 && (*p1 == '0'))
    p1++;

  while (*p2 && (*p2 == '0'))
    p2++;

  /* Match upto decimal point */
  while (((*p1 && *p2) && ((*p1 != '.') && (*p2 != '.'))) && (*p1 == *p2))
  {
    p1++;
    p2++;
  }

  /* if a decimal point was found, then eliminate trailing zeros */
  if ((*p1 == '.') && (*p2 == '.'))
  {
    /* Eliminate trailing zeros (from back) */
    while (*p1b == '0')
      p1b--;
    while (*p2b == '0')
      p2b--;

    /* match string forward, only upto the remaining portion after
     * discarding of the trailing zero after decimal
     */
    while (((p1 != p1b) && (p2 != p2b)) && (*p1 == *p2))
    {
      p1++;
      p2++;
    }
  }

  /* First condition on the LHS of || will be true for decimal portion
   * for float the RHS will be . If not equal then none will be equal
   */
  if (((*p1 == '\0') && (*p2 == '\0')) ||  ((p1 == p1b) && (p2 == p2b)))
    printf ("\nEqual");
  else
    printf ("\nNot equal");

  printf ("\n");
  return 0;
}

Needs some testing before use.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is the method I always use, as I rely on the str* family of functions a lot. Looks like it's actually the norm. Good to know! – Valdogg21 Jun 17 '11 at 18:59
    
@Valdogg21: have a look at the code i updated, this now can compare floating point numbers, as per the protocol you have set. – phoxis Jun 17 '11 at 19:12

str(n)cmp is the fastest and safest.

share|improve this answer
1  
str(n)cmp fails on integer strings with a differing number of leading zeros. – JAB Jun 17 '11 at 18:12
1  
@JAB: are you saying that the strings "002" and "0002" are the same? – Chris Jun 17 '11 at 18:14
    
@cnicutar: What are you talking about? I was referring to a situation such as comparing 100 and 0100. The comparison will fail because both strcmp and strncmp would return non-zero values when the desired value would be 0, indicating equality. – JAB Jun 17 '11 at 18:15
    
@Chris: No, I'm saying that the numbers represented by the strings "002" and "0002" are the same. – JAB Jun 17 '11 at 18:15
    
I thought you were thinking of something else :-) Indeed, I wasn't thinking about leading zeros. – cnicutar Jun 17 '11 at 18:16

Assuming you are looking for them to be idential, strncmp will be the fastest and safest since it can do a direct comparison without any conversions. It is also generally considered safer than strcmp.

However, if you want 00 and 0 to be equal, or other ways that you can represent the same number slightly differently, you will need to use atoi.

share|improve this answer
2  
"The atoi() function has been deprecated by strtol() and should not be used in new code." – Dietrich Epp Jun 17 '11 at 18:21
    
Good to know, thanks. – Alan Geleynse Jun 17 '11 at 19:53

In my opinion, the "safest" way would likely be to convert both arguments to integers and then test, as that way you'll avoid the potential leading-zeros problem. It's probably not the fastest or most efficient method, though.

share|improve this answer

You can simply use following :

if(strcmp("123","123") == 0)

{

  printf("The strings are equal");

}

else

{

  printf("The strings are not equal.");

}

In my opinion it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
the asker wanted to match if the two numbers represented in the string was equal or not – phoxis Jun 18 '11 at 7:33

I suggest this way for integers:

int strcmp_for_integers(char *aa, char *bb){
    char aa2[11] = "";
    char bb2[11] = "";
    int answer;

    sprintf(aa2, "%010d", atoi(aa));
    sprintf(bb2, "%010d", atoi(bb));
    answer = strcmp(aa2, bb2);

    return answer;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.