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I usually write SQL queries for SQL Server and MySQL but I just recently started to work with an ODBC data source that points to a Progress database. My question is where can I find a good syntax reference for writing SQL for an ODBC data source. I need to know what I can or can't do but there seems to be no guides I can find out on the internet.

Thanks!

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

ODBC is just a kind of connection. SQL queries syntax will still depend on the RDBMS which will process them in the other end.

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1  
Also, you should be able to use JDBC with postgres as well – John Kane Jun 17 '11 at 19:47
    
If you're using JDBC/ODBC bridge, why not just cut out the middle man and use JDBC? If you're going to ODBC without using JDBC/ODBC Bridge, why do something so nonstandard? – Jay Jun 17 '11 at 20:10

As Adrian mentioned, you can just use the same queries you used before for the database that you connect to. If you want to leverage the fact that you are using ODBC data source and add some database server platform independence, you can consider using ODBC escape sequences: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms715364(v=vs.85).aspx .

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Try these --

Progress SQL-89 Guide and Reference

Progress SQL-92 Guide and Reference

Of course the guide that you need will depend upone the ODBC driver you are using.

(Only OpenLink Software do a SQL-89 driver which offers better functionality with older Progress databases - particularly when working with Extent/Array datatypes etc...)

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