Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a nice resource managing class. For concreteness, lets have it be a File class for managing a FILE* (handling the open and close operations)

What is the usual approach when there are cases where the resource doesn't need to be managed by me, and is someone else's responsibility?

For ilustrative purposes, I currently have something like this:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    File my_file(argv[1]); //I unconditionaly obtain the resource
    //...
    return 0;  //and unconditionally relinquish with the destructor
}

And want something like

int main()
{
    if(argc <= 1){
        //use stdin that is already available
    }else{
        //obtain a file from argv[1]
    }
    //...
    if(argc <= 1){
        //nothing to do
    }else{
        //close the file we obtained
    }
}

(but less ugly, more robust, etc...)

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your RAII class is already keeping enough state to know when to destroy the resource it is controlling. It can also contain a flag that tells it if the resource should be destroyed, or you can use a special value on the counter to indicate that the resource is controlled outside the class.

Then all you need is a way to control the state when you obtain the resource. You can have two different constructors for example, or a parameter on the constructor with a default value. You could have an Attach method that attaches an existing resource. It's entirely up to you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

boost::shared_ptr allows you to pass in a custom destructor. If you're wrapping an externally-managed pointer, you can pass a no-op:

namespace {
template<typename T>
void noop_destruct(T *) throw() { }
}

template<typename T>
boost::shared_ptr<T> make_dummy_shared_ptr(T *p) {
    return boost::shared_ptr<T>(p, noop_destruct);
}

Now when you need a true RAII object, use a normal boost::shared_ptr, and when you need a fake one, use an adapter like this - it'll act exactly like a normal pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I use shared pointers with noop destructors in a few places. really useful –  totowtwo Jun 17 '11 at 19:52
1  
Can be done with unique_ptr, too, if one wants to avoid reference counting overhead. –  ildjarn Jun 17 '11 at 19:56
    
The drawback to unique_ptr, @Ildjarn, is that the deleter type has to be specified as a template parameter, so the deleter you use for the no-op case needs to be the same type as the deleter you use for the other cases. –  Rob Kennedy Jun 17 '11 at 20:12
    
@Rob : Right -- the fact that the deleter needs to be intelligent was implied. :-] –  ildjarn Jun 17 '11 at 20:15
add comment

You can push the logic of whether or not to use the resource inside your resource managing class. Then it isn't conditional anymore. Just do

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    File my_file(argc > 1 ? argv[1]: NULL); //If NULL, File will point to stdin
    //...
    return 0;  //File's destructor will run, relinquishing resources if necessary.
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Most common patterns do not allow for this. However, you can allow custom allocator plugins, which the Standard has for it's containers, that will allow for these semantics. This is a brief sample-

class Allocator {
    File* Allocate(...) {
        return fopen(...);
    }
};
class MyStdinAllocator {
    File* Allocate(...) {
        return ...;
    }
};
template<typename MyAllocator = Allocator> class File {
    File* ptr;
    Allocator alloc;
    File(..., const Allocator& allocref)
    : alloc(allocref) {
        ptr = alloc.Allocate(...);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.