Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to implement a tree in F# using a list of tuples.
[a] where a = (string, [a])
Each node has a list of their children and leaf nodes would be (name, [])

I want to be able to recursively iterate through each level of the list like this.

    a
 b     e
c d   f g

They wont always be binary trees however.

let t2 = [("a", [("b", [("c", []), ("d", [])]), ("e", [("f", []), ("g", [])])])]

let rec checkstuff tple =
    match tple with
    | (_, []) -> true
    | (node, children) ->
        List.fold ( || ) false (List.map checkstuff children)

I get:

Type mismatch. Expecting a
    ('a * 'b list) list
but given a
    'b list
The resulting type would be infinite when unifying ''a' and ''b * 'a list'

Is there a way I can do something like this or is there not support for a recursive list of tuples like this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Try changing your data structure a bit:

type Tree =
  | Branch of string * Tree list
  | Leaf of string

let t2 = Branch ("a", [Branch ("b", [Leaf "c"; Leaf "d"]); Branch ("e", [Leaf "f"; Leaf "g"])])

let rec checkstuff tree =
    match tree with
    | Leaf _ -> true
    | Branch (node, children) ->
        List.fold ( || ) false (List.map checkstuff children)
share|improve this answer

There are a couple ways to approach this, and Daniel's is nice. But here is another way (also using discriminant unions) to define a recursive data structure, this one being a bit closer to your own approach (though I think I may actually prefer Daniel's since the cases are more explicit):

type tree<'a> =
    | Node of 'a * list<tree<'a>>

let t3 = Node("a", [Node("b", [Node("c",[]); Node("d",[])]); Node("e", [Node("f",[]); Node("g",[])])])

let rec checkstuff tple =
    match tple with
    | Node(_, []) -> true
    | Node(node, children) ->
        List.fold ( || ) false (List.map checkstuff children)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.