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I've been programming some stuff in Actionscript (haXe) and arrived this very specific problem.

Here's the code (pseudo :S):

var func:Array = new Array(256);
(A) var i:Int = 0;
for(;i<256;i++) {  // OR // for(i in 0...256) {
  func[i] = function() { trace(i); }
}

func[0]();
func[127]();
func[256]();

The above code outputs (a):

256
256
256

I want that to be (b):

0
127
256

That doesn't happen, because Actionscript/Haxe is assigning the reference of i to the function, and since i equals 256 at the end of the loop where the functions get evaluated, that's why I get (a).

Does anyone know of a way to avoid that and get the expected results at (b) ?

Thanks to all of you guys and your responses.

I think I've found the answer. If you remove the line marked with (A) it works, if you leave it it doesn't. I'm pretty sure you could all figure out why that happens. Thanks again!

share|improve this question
    
Can you give us more details on your use case? I don't understand this at all... you're creating 256 copies of the same function but never storing any values. 'i' is instantiated once and then overwritten in each iteration. I is the ONLY variable (besides the array of duplicate functions) that you create. You can store the results of a function perhaps? But storing the same function over and over in an array doesn't make any sense to me. –  Jonathan Rowny Jun 17 '11 at 21:50
    
can you explain it better? This code should work out of the box in HaXe the way you want it, except maybe if you're compiling to AS3 source code. Is that the case? –  Waneck Jun 19 '11 at 20:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

it's not neccessary to use callback, this should work as expected (haxe creates a local var in each loop):

var func = [];
for(i in 0...256)
  func[i] = function() trace(i);

func[0]();
func[127]();
share|improve this answer

The one you show is the expected/desired behavior. To retain the value of "i" you must use "callback":

/* not pseudo code ;) */

var func = [];
for(i in 0...256)
  func[i] = callback(function(v) trace(v), i);

func[0]();
func[127]();
func[256]();
share|improve this answer
    
true, although in this case callback isn't necessary, as @hotpotato said. –  back2dos Jun 30 '11 at 18:27

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