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I'm trying to make a function that takes two data types, each of which I know will be a descendent of a drawable class, meaning my function depends on some of drawable's functions. However because it is a template function I can't do this.

How can I make it so I can use these descendant class functions? Or make it so only descendents of drawable are accepted?

here's the beginning of my function. GetPositionY is drawable's function.

template<typename T, typename T2>
bool CheckCollision(T* obj1, T2* obj2){
    obj1->GetPositionY;
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It's usual to call it a derived class, not a descendant. –  Karl von Moor Jun 17 '11 at 22:00
2  
bool CheckCollision(drawable* obj1, drawable* obj2); ? –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 17 '11 at 22:02
1  
you should elaborate on what it is you 'can't do', the wide range of answer you have so far is because we can't tell if you have just misunderstood how templates work or are actually trying to do something more tricky –  jk. Jun 17 '11 at 22:15
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A CheckCollision() function shall require the client to pass an object that provides GetPosition() methods. That's what you do when calling obj1->GetPositionX() inside your template. There's no reason to force it to pass a drawable object.

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This is called duck typing, and its a pretty big part of the appeal of C++'s template system. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 17 '11 at 22:09
    
Is there a reason why someone downvoted this? –  Karl von Moor Jun 17 '11 at 22:13
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By using a combination of :

boost::is_base_of from Boost.TypeTraits http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/type_traits/doc/html/boost_typetraits/reference/is_base_of.html

and boost::enable_if

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/utility/enable_if.html

template<typename T, typename T2>
typename boost::enable_if< boost::is_base_of< Drawable, T1>, bool>::type 
CheckCollision(T* obj1, T2* obj2)
{
  obj1->GetPositionY(); // ... whatever
}
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Unlike C#, which will assume the lowest common denominator and requires the use of the "where" clause to resolve this, C++ takes the path of not checking the template type usage until the method is actually invoked with a specific type. So only types that provide the required methods will compile. e.g.

template<typename T, typename T2>
bool CheckCollision(T* obj1, T2* obj2) {
        obj1->GetPositionY;
}

class A
{
        public:
                int GetPositionY;
                A() { };
};

class B
{
        public:
                B() { };
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
        A a;
        B b;

        // this compiles just fine
        CheckCollision(&a, &a);
        // this line will not compile, "error: 'class B' has no member named 'GetPositionY'"
        // CheckCollision(&b, &b);

        return 0;
}

There is a discussion about this difference with C# and C++ generics here.

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Add a trait structure for your drawable class that you can use to test whether the types instantiated in the template are the correct types. This would look something like

//default for any data-type
template<typename T>
struct drawable_type
{
    enum { drawable = 0 };
};

//specialization for a drawable class
template<>
struct drawable_type<drawable>
{
    enum { drawable = 1 };
};

template<typename T, typename T2>
bool CheckCollision(T* obj1, T2* obj2) 
{ 
    if (drawable_type<T>::drawable && drawable_type<T2>::drawable)
    {
        //do something
    }
    else
        return false; 
}

Now if the types past aren't drawable, your function will simply return false, otherwise you can continue to test and see if a collision occurred.

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