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I'm trying to implement a Queue in C (using a Linked List) to store pointers to data. The en-queuing seems to be working fine, but some trouble with pointers upon de-queuing.

In my main():

void* data = malloc(sizeof(int));
dequeue(&Q, data);
printf("(%d) %d\n", k, *(int*)data);

dequeue():

int dequeue(struct queue *q, void *value)
{
    struct queue_node *tmp;

    if (!q->first) {
        value = 0;
        return 1;
    }
    value = q->first->data;
    tmp = q->first;
    if (q->first == q->last)
        q->first = q->last = NULL;
    else
        q->first = q->first->next;

    free(tmp);
    return 0;
}

Based on my debugging, it seems that the value of the *data pointer in the main() for loop doesn't retain the value that it's set to in dequeue(). What am I missing?

Edit:

struct queue_node
{
    struct queue_node *next;    
    void* data;
};

struct queue
{
    struct queue_node *first;
    struct queue_node *last;
};
share|improve this question
    
Care to share your definition of the queue and queue_node structures, or is the guessing game part of the question? Update: thanks! – Kerrek SB Jun 17 '11 at 22:09
    
Also, why do you free(tmp)? Can you guarantee that that is a valid pointer to malloc()ed memory? – Kerrek SB Jun 17 '11 at 22:11
    
As in the answer below, you're not assigning the result to the right thing. You want to return a void*, so your argument should be a void** pp, and you assign *pp = q->first->data. – Kerrek SB Jun 17 '11 at 22:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The queue_node's data holds a pointer to some value (here it is an int, but it may not be true always, otherwise you'd use an int instead...)

Since this value was allocated with malloc (and is not a local variable) you need to also free it at some point.

So, change the function's signature to accept a void**, don't allocate space for an int in main() but call dequeue with &data as a parameter, where void * data = 0. Don't forget to free data when done. In dequeue, set *value = q->first->data.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks! – Alexei Jun 17 '11 at 22:20
    
@Alexei: don't forget to test the answer and then accept it ;) – Andrei Jun 17 '11 at 22:22

You're setting the value of the "value" variable, which is a pointer local to the function.

If you want to set the value to which it points, use:

*value = 0; 

and:

*value = q->first->data;

Edit (after question edit): Since queue_node.data is itself a pointer, it makes more sense to pass a void**, as @Andrei notes above.

share|improve this answer
    
q->first->data is a pointer, *value is..what? – Andrei Jun 17 '11 at 22:19
    
@Andrei, this was posted before the edit showing the definition of queue_node. Based on the casts, I was guessing that the 'data' member was an int. – Andy Thomas Jun 17 '11 at 22:31
    
The system doesn't let me remove the downvote if you don't edit the answer. – Andrei Jun 17 '11 at 22:44
    
@Andrei - Done. – Andy Thomas Jun 17 '11 at 23:58

Assuming data is a (void *) and you want the (int) value pointed to by data, you'll have to replace

value = q->first->data;

with

*(int *)value = *(int *)q->first->data;

in the function deque();

share|improve this answer
    
But in the dequeue() function, you don't know the data type that it's pointing to – Alexei Jun 17 '11 at 22:17
    
Now that you updated the question, @Andrei has the right answer. – jman Jul 21 '11 at 5:20

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