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I would like to create a struct and use it inside an other struct as an array. My problem is that I don't know how big array I would like to allocate, I will only know once I am in a function. I mean I would like to use [] instead of a pre-determined constant, like 10000.

I think if you look at my code it would be self-explanatory. Can you help me how to make this code work? Moreover it would help me a lot if you could tell me what is the name of the topic I am asking about (is it dynamic arrays?) and that where can I find articles/tutorials about this topic.

Here is the code with my broken way of thinking about arrays in structs.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct keyframe {
    bool a;
    int b;
    int c;
};


struct keyframe_file {
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    keyframe keyframes[];
};


int main() {

    keyframe_file my_file;

    my_file.num_views = 1;
    my_file.num_keyframes = 6;

    my_file.keyframes = new keyframe[my_file.num_keyframes];

    my_file.keyframes[0].a = true;
    my_file.keyframes[0].b = 5;
    my_file.keyframes[0].c = 9;

    return 0;

}
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I guess how to create resizeable array or how to create a limitless array are some good topic for your question. –  Ali.S Jun 17 '11 at 23:40
1  
"dynamic memory allocation" and "containers" are good search terms. –  SoapBox Jun 17 '11 at 23:42
    
consider the answer that I gave even if you don't want to change the correct answer, it doesn't matter, what matters is that you can't assign values to constants. –  Tamer Shlash Jun 18 '11 at 0:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If it suits your purpose, an STL container (std::vector) is easily one of the best options - the less memory management you have to worry about, the better.

In any case, look at the struct definition Nawaz posted above - that's exactly how it should be. Dynamic arrays in C++ are simply pointers. You have, however, allocated the memory properly in your code, but you haven't freed it (so it's leaking). Since you allocated with new [] you will need to

delete [] my_file.keyframes;

in order to free the memory properly.

Resizing is another issue: with a smart implementation, array resizing can be an amortized O(1) operation which is nice. When you resize, it will always take you O(n) since you need to copy all the elements into a new array of different size, but if you do it half as much, it becomes O(1). That is, double the array each time you need to resize. Here is a very quick example

void resize()
{
  if(numOfElementsInArray == sizeOfArray)
  {
    ArrayType * arr = new ArrayType[sizeOfArray*2]; // Allocate a double size array
    for(int i=0;i<sizeOfArray;++i)
      currentArray[i] = arr[i];
    delete [] currentArray; // Free memory in old array
    currentArray = arr; // Set the array to our new one
    sizeOfArray *= 2; // Double the size
  }
}

NOTE: The example above does not take into account space complexity; that said, if you have 5000 elements, and remove all but 5, this method with not shrink it (which is probably what you will want to do for all practical purposes)

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Thank you for the answer, I learned from it and I accepted yours to help with the points! –  zsero Jun 18 '11 at 0:14
    
"Dynamic arrays in C++ are simply pointers" - dynamically-allocated arrays are arrays. Pointers to their first elements are simply pointers. If you do Foo *x = new Foo[2];, then x is not a dynamic-allocated array. It is a pointer to the first element of one. –  Steve Jessop Jun 18 '11 at 0:23
    
@jdl: amortized O(1) is not inefficient nor is it CPU consuming/slow (it runs in constant time over the program's execution time - i.e. amortized). If my explanation didn't make sense, read more here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  RageD Jun 18 '11 at 1:22

Use a std::vector.

struct keyframe_file {
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    std::vector<keyframe> keyframes;
};

int main() {
    keyframe_file frame;
    frame.keyframes.resize(...);
}
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Just note that serialization will be an issue. If you're reading the struct in from a file or something (the struct being called "keyframe_file" implying this might be the case), you'll need some functionality to read in and reassemble the struct rather than reading it in directly. –  cHao Jun 17 '11 at 23:46
1  
@DeadMG: That is not enough. The struct needs a constructor, as the first two members are const, and hence they cannot be assigned. They must be initialized with values, which is possible using constructor only, as the struct is no more a POD. –  Nawaz Jun 18 '11 at 0:02
    
Thank you for the answer, I am using it now and it works perfectly! The const doesn't need to be there its my choice and in this case there was no point using consts, so I deleted them! –  zsero Jun 18 '11 at 0:12
    
@DeadMG: it's not a good idea for a beginner to use STL classes. –  Tamer Shlash Jun 18 '11 at 0:15
4  
@Mr.: Au contraire! Beginners should use STL classes right from the beginning and struggle with pointers later on. At least according to Mr. Stroustrup ;-) –  fredoverflow Jun 18 '11 at 0:17

Your code appears to be almost correct, except for two things:

  1. keyframes needs to be a keyframe* rather than a keyframe[]
  2. You forgot to delete the memory you allocated
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That is incomplete type. In C++, array must be provided with size, and the size must be known at compile time itself.

You're using new, with which you should be using pointer.

struct keyframe_file {
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    keyframe *keyframes;
};

But std::vector<keyframe> is still a better choice, as @DeadMG already suggested.

By the way, the first two members are const in the struct, that means, they cannot be assigned value, as you're doing in your code. They must be initialized with values you want them to hold. That implies, now with vector, you've to include a constructor, to initialize the struct, as the struct is no more a POD.

struct keyframe_file {
    const int num_views; //const member
    const int num_keyframes; //const member
    std::vector<keyframe> keyframes;

    keyframe_file(int nviews, int nkeyframes) 
    : num_views(nviews), num_keyframes(nkeyframes), keyframes(nkeyframes){}
};


keyframe_file my_file(1,6); //done!
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Thank you for this answer, now I know more about consts. Luckily in the example above I decide what code to use, so I could simply afford not to use consts. –  zsero Jun 18 '11 at 0:14

The suggested "Vector" is they safest way to do it.
But if it is only about making your code work (without resizing and stuff) the following should be working:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct keyframe {
    bool a;
    int b;
    int c;
};


struct keyframe_file {
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    keyframe* keyframes;
};


int main()
{
    keyframe_file my_file = {1, 6};  // initialization needed bcause of 'const int'

    my_file.keyframes = new keyframe[my_file.num_keyframes];

    for (int i = 0; i < my_file.num_keyframes; i++)
    {
        my_file.keyframes[i].a = true;
        my_file.keyframes[i].b = 5 + i;
        my_file.keyframes[i].c = 9 - i;
    }
    return 0;
}

somewhere in your code, when you are done using the array you have to call delete [] my_file.keyframes; as already mentioned.

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There's a basic rule when using dynamic arrays in c++, especially when using it inside structs or classes, and it's to delete what you no longer need.

If you want to make your struct dynamic, it's easy, just replace the [] with * and the array will become dynamic, but it's not over yet, there is a lot of work.

You have to construct the array and destory it, and destoroying it is possible and useful noly with destructors, like this:

struct keyframe_file
{
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    keyframe* keyframes;

    ~keyframe_file() // this is the destructor
    {
        delete[] keyframes;
    }
};

Yet even that code isn't going to work at all, since you are assigning values to constants in variable my_file after creating it, it's illegal in c++, you should then use classes instead.

Using classes with dynamic arrays is very easy and interesting and makes your code very good, you don't have to know too much to do that, just learn what is a constructor, an initializer, destructor, private and public and go on with the following code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct keyframe
{
    bool a;
    int b,c;
};

class keyframe_file
{
public:
    keyframe_file(int NV, int NKF):num_keyframes(NKF),num_views(NV)
    {
        keyframes = new keyframe[num_keyframes];
    }
    ~keyframe_file()
    {
        delete[] keyframes;
    }
private:
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    keyframe* keyframes;
};

int main()
{
    keyframe_file my_file(1,6);
    return 0;
}

This code works very well, it allows you to assign value to the constants num_views and num_keyframes for one time when creating the object (variable) my_file.

Remember, you are a C++ programmer, be proud of that, and use classes instead of structs and dynamic arrays instead of static ones.

Hope that's useful.

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I expect this code will throw warnings on some compilers, since the data members num_views and num_keyframes aren't initialized in the same order that they appear in the initializer list in the constructor. More importantly, keyframe_file is missing a copy ctor, which should either be defined to allocate its own array, or else made private (in C++0x marked delete) to prevent use. In this case no need to worry about the copy assignment operator, since there are const data members, but otherwise the same would apply to that. vector does all this for you. –  Steve Jessop Jun 18 '11 at 0:31

Use pointers and apply to your structure!

int *p;
p = new int;

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct keyframe {
    bool a;
    int b;
    int c;
};


struct keyframe_file {
    const int num_views;
    const int num_keyframes;
    keyframe *keyframes;
};


int main() {
    keyframe_file my_file;
    my_file.num_views = 1;
    my_file.num_keyframes = 6;

    for (int i = 0; i < my_file.num_keyframes; i++){
         my_file.keyframes = new keyframe; //<---
    }

    my_file.keyframes[0].a = true;
    my_file.keyframes[0].b = 5;
    my_file.keyframes[0].c = 9;

    return 0;

}
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