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as a follow up to this question, how can the code be changed so that i can use it in the constructor of a class? im writing a new class where the input needs to be an number of some kind, but nothing else. the code, however, is like declaring the type in front of a function. since constructors dont exactly have types, i need it to not declare a type for the function itself

my new class:

class C{
     public:
         C();
         C(T value);// specifically looking for this


         T f(T value); // what the code currently does

};

the code in the link creates a function that [accepts and] returns an integer type T. i need it to not return anything at all, so that it can be used with a constructor

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1  
It is better you give example in form of some code to let us know what you exactly want to achieve. –  iammilind Jun 18 '11 at 7:17
3  
The question is so unclear that it cannot be answered with confidence. –  Nawaz Jun 18 '11 at 7:21
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closed as not a real question by Nawaz, iammilind, Bo Persson, ybungalobill, Graviton Jun 18 '11 at 8:18

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you want to restrict types for constructor template. If so, then you can do this:

#include <type_traits>
//#include <tr1/type_traits> // for C++03, use std::tr1::

class C
{
  public:

     template<typename T>
     C(T value, typename enable_if<std::is_arithmetic<T>::value,T>::type *p=0)
     {

     }
};

This constructor template can accept only those T for which is_arithmetic<T>::value is true. The implementation of enable_if is exactly same, as given in the other answer.


Alternatively, or if you don't have type_traits, then you can use typelist along with enable_if. I think this is a better solution, as you can specifically define the supported typelist.

typedef typelist<int> t1;
typedef typelist<short, t1> t2;
typedef typelist<char, t2> t3;
typedef typelist<unsigned char, t3> t4;
//and so on

typedef t4 supported_types;//supported_types: int, short, char, unsigned char

class C
{
  public:

     template<typename T>
     C(T value, typename enable_if<exits<T,supported_types>::value,T>::type *p=0)
     {

     }
};

This constructor template can accept only those T for which exists<T,supported_types>::value is true. The exists metafunction checks whether T is existing in the typelist supported_types or no. You can add more types to this typelist.

And the implementation of typelist, and exists is here (see my solution):

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