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When defining a decorator using a class, how do I automatically transfer over__name__, __module__ and __doc__? Normally, I would use the @wraps decorator from functools. Here's what I did instead for a class (this is not entirely my code):

class memoized:
    """Decorator that caches a function's return value each time it is called.
    If called later with the same arguments, the cached value is returned, and
    not re-evaluated.
    """
    def __init__(self, func):
        super().__init__()
        self.func = func
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args):
        try:
            return self.cache[args]
        except KeyError:
            value = self.func(*args)
            self.cache[args] = value
            return value
        except TypeError:
            # uncacheable -- for instance, passing a list as an argument.
            # Better to not cache than to blow up entirely.
            return self.func(*args)

    def __repr__(self):
        return self.func.__repr__()

    def __get__(self, obj, objtype):
        return functools.partial(self.__call__, obj)

    __doc__ = property(lambda self:self.func.__doc__)
    __module__ = property(lambda self:self.func.__module__)
    __name__ = property(lambda self:self.func.__name__)

Is there a standard decorator to automate the creation of name module and doc? Also, to automate the get method (I assume that's for creating bound methods?) Are there any missing methods?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Everyone seems to have missed the obvious solution.

>>> import functools
>>> class memoized(object):
    """Decorator that caches a function's return value each time it is called.
    If called later with the same arguments, the cached value is returned, and
    not re-evaluated.
    """
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
        self.cache = {}
        functools.update_wrapper(self, func)  ## TA-DA! ##
    def __call__(self, *args):
        pass  # Not needed for this demo.

>>> @memoized
def fibonacci(n):
    """fibonacci docstring"""
    pass  # Not needed for this demo.

>>> fibonacci
<__main__.memoized object at 0x0156DE30>
>>> fibonacci.__name__
'fibonacci'
>>> fibonacci.__doc__
'fibonacci docstring'
share|improve this answer

I'm not aware of such things in stdlib, but we can create our own if we need to.

Something like this can work :

from functools import WRAPPER_ASSIGNMENTS


def class_wraps(cls):
    """Update a wrapper class `cls` to look like the wrapped."""

    class Wrapper(cls):
        """New wrapper that will extend the wrapper `cls` to make it look like `wrapped`.

        wrapped: Original function or class that is beign decorated.
        assigned: A list of attribute to assign to the the wrapper, by default they are:
             ['__doc__', '__name__', '__module__', '__annotations__'].

        """

        def __init__(self, wrapped, assigned=WRAPPER_ASSIGNMENTS):
            self.__wrapped = wrapped
            for attr in assigned:
                setattr(self, attr, getattr(wrapped, attr))

            super().__init__(wrapped)

        def __repr__(self):
            return repr(self.__wrapped)

    return Wrapper

Usage:

@class_wraps
class memoized:
    """Decorator that caches a function's return value each time it is called.
    If called later with the same arguments, the cached value is returned, and
    not re-evaluated.
    """

    def __init__(self, func):
        super().__init__()
        self.func = func
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args):
        try:
            return self.cache[args]
        except KeyError:
            value = self.func(*args)
            self.cache[args] = value
            return value
        except TypeError:
            # uncacheable -- for instance, passing a list as an argument.
            # Better to not cache than to blow up entirely.
            return self.func(*args)

    def __get__(self, obj, objtype):
        return functools.partial(self.__call__, obj)


@memoized
def fibonacci(n):
    """fibonacci docstring"""
    if n in (0, 1):
       return n
    return fibonacci(n-1) + fibonacci(n-2)


print(fibonacci)
print("__doc__: ", fibonacci.__doc__)
print("__name__: ", fibonacci.__name__)

Output:

<function fibonacci at 0x14627c0>
__doc__:  fibonacci docstring
__name__:  fibonacci

EDIT:

And if you are wondering why this wasn't included in the stdlib is because you can wrap your class decorator in a function decorater and use functools.wraps like this:

def wrapper(f):

    memoize = memoized(f)

    @functools.wraps(f)
    def helper(*args, **kws):
        return memoize(*args, **kws)

    return helper


@wrapper
def fibonacci(n):
    """fibonacci docstring"""
    if n <= 1:
       return n
    return fibonacci(n-1) + fibonacci(n-2)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mouad. Do you know what the purpose of the __get__ method is? –  Neil G Jun 18 '11 at 18:19
    
Oh, I see: it makes the decorator work with methods? It probably should be in class_wraps then? –  Neil G Jun 18 '11 at 18:24
    
@Neil: Yes For more detail: stackoverflow.com/questions/5469956/… , IMO i don't think so because it will violate one of the principles that i believe in for function or class which is unique responsibility , which in the case of class_wraps will be to Update a wrapper class to look like the wrapped. no less not more :) –  mouad Jun 18 '11 at 18:54
    
@mouad: Thanks a lot. I have a couple more questions (for you or anyone else) if you don't mind: 1. Isn't it true that we will want to override __get__ for all "callable class" decorators? 2. Why do we use functools.partial instead of returning a bound method with types.MethodType(self.__call__, obj)? –  Neil G Jun 18 '11 at 22:18
    
@Neil: 1. Yes if you want to be able to decorate also methods (not just functions) as you already said , and i strongly believe that it's a good practice to implement also the _get__ method for class decorator so to not have any weird problems after :) 2. I think it just a a question of preference the beauty is in the eye of the beholder right , i prefer to use functools.partial in cases like this one and mostly i use types.* to test the types of an object, Hope i answer your questions :) –  mouad Jun 19 '11 at 17:44

All we really need to do is modify the behavior of the decorator so that it is "hygienic", i.e. it is attribute-preserving.

#!/usr/bin/python3

def hygienic(decorator):
    def new_decorator(original):
        wrapped = decorator(original)
        wrapped.__name__ = original.__name__
        wrapped.__doc__ = original.__doc__
        wrapped.__module__ = original.__module__
        return wrapped
    return new_decorator

This is ALL you need. In general. It doesn't preserve the signature, but if you really want that you can use a library to do that. I also went ahead and rewrote the memoization code so that it works on keyword arguments as well. Also there was a bug where failure to convert it to a hashable tuple would make it not work in 100% of cases.

Demo of rewritten memoized decorator with @hygienic modifying its behavior. memoized is now a function that wraps the original class, though you can (like the other answer) write a wrapping class instead, or even better, something which detects if it's a class and if so wraps the __init__ method.

@hygienic
class memoized:
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.func = func
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args, **kw):
        try:
            key = (tuple(args), frozenset(kw.items()))
            if not key in self.cache:
                self.cache[key] = self.func(*args,**kw)
            return self.cache[key]
        except TypeError:
            # uncacheable -- for instance, passing a list as an argument.
            # Better to not cache than to blow up entirely.
            return self.func(*args,**kw)

In action:

@memoized
def f(a, b=5, *args, keyword=10):
    """Intact docstring!"""
    print('f was called!')
    return {'a':a, 'b':b, 'args':args, 'keyword':10}

x=f(0)  
#OUTPUT: f was called!
print(x)
#OUTPUT: {'a': 0, 'b': 5, 'keyword': 10, 'args': ()}                 

y=f(0)
#NO OUTPUT - MEANS MEMOIZATION IS WORKING
print(y)
#OUTPUT: {'a': 0, 'b': 5, 'keyword': 10, 'args': ()}          

print(f.__name__)
#OUTPUT: 'f'
print(f.__doc__)
#OUTPUT: 'Intact docstring!'
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't working for the memoized example. –  Neil G Jun 20 '11 at 4:20
    
@Neil: there we go, updated –  ninjagecko Jun 20 '11 at 4:43
    
The @hygienic does not work for code where the wrapped decorator class has a class attribute. Mouad's solution works though. The problem reported is: AttributeError: 'function' object has no attribute 'level' when trying to do decoratorclassname.level += 1 inside the __call__ –  cfi Mar 23 '12 at 7:56

Another solution using inheritance:

import functools
import types

class CallableClassDecorator:
    """Base class that extracts attributes and assigns them to self.

    By default the extracted attributes are:
         ['__doc__', '__name__', '__module__'].
    """

    def __init__(self, wrapped, assigned=functools.WRAPPER_ASSIGNMENTS):
        for attr in assigned:
            setattr(self, attr, getattr(wrapped, attr))
        super().__init__()

    def __get__(self, obj, objtype):
        return types.MethodType(self.__call__, obj)

And, usage:

class memoized(CallableClassDecorator):
    """Decorator that caches a function's return value each time it is called.
    If called later with the same arguments, the cached value is returned, and
    not re-evaluated.
    """
    def __init__(self, function):
        super().__init__(function)
        self.function = function
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args):
        try:
            return self.cache[args]
        except KeyError:
            value = self.function(*args)
            self.cache[args] = value
            return value
        except TypeError:
            # uncacheable -- for instance, passing a list as an argument.
            # Better to not cache than to blow up entirely.
            return self.function(*args)
share|improve this answer
    
The reason you shouldn't use this is because, as you show, you have to call the __init__ method of the parent classes (not necessarily just super(); you should google for method resolution order python). –  ninjagecko Jun 20 '11 at 4:03
    
@ninjagecko: Isn't it up to the super class to call the __init__ method of the other parent classes? –  Neil G Jun 20 '11 at 4:08
    
It somewhat of an open question, as far as I know, I may be wrong though. fuhm.net/super-harmful Also stackoverflow.com/questions/1385759/… does not seem to indicate any consensus. –  ninjagecko Jun 20 '11 at 4:48
    
@ninjagecko: Yes, I've read the first article. What I've been doing is to always call super().__init__ from every class no matter what. This way I can count on all __init__ methods being called as long as everyone I inherit from does this. Unfortunately, I've discovered that PyQt classes don't do this. I really thought that this was how co-operative inheritance had to work, but from what you're saying it sounds like I might be the only one! –  Neil G Jun 20 '11 at 4:54

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