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I've been working on a program for a research project in physics. The program is written in C but uses a fortran function (it's called "zgesv" and it's from the LAPACK and BLAS libraries).

The idea is to solve a system of equations. LHS.X = RHS for the vector "X". int INFO is passed to zgesv. If the equations can't be solved (i.e. LHS is singular), info is supposed to return a value != 0;

Trying to run my program as "normal" by passing my double * to the solve function (solution 1, in the following code), INFO is returned as 0 -- even if LHS is singular. Not only that, but if I print out solution, it's a disaster of numbers - some small, some zero, some huge.

If I create LHS and RHS manually by doing LHS[] = {value 1, value 2, ...}; RHS[] = {value 1, value 2, ...}; Then INFO is returned as 3 as expected, and solution is equal to RHS (which is also what I would expect.)

If I declare arrays LHS2[] = {value 1, value 2, ...}; RHS2[] = {value 1, value 2, ...}; and copy them into LHS and RHS element by element, then INFO is returned as 8 (it's weird to me that it's different than the previous case.), and solution is equal to RHS.

I feel like this must be some fundamental difference between the two ways of declaring an array. I don't really have access to muck with the function zgesv to make it take the types I want since A) it's a standard in the scientific community, and B) it's written in fortran - which I haven't ever learned.

Can anyone explain what's going on here? Is there a simple (and preferably computationally cheap) fix? Should I just copy my double * into an array[]?

Here is my program (modified for testing):

include

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#define PI 3.1415926535897932384626433832795029L

#define ERROR_VALUE 911.911


int* getA(int N, char* argv[])
{
  int i;
  int* AMatrix;
  AMatrix = malloc(N * N * sizeof(int));

  if (AMatrix == NULL)
  {
    printf("Failed to allocate memory for AMatrix. Exiting.");
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  for (i = 0; i < N * N; i++)
  {
    AMatrix[i] = atoi(argv[i + 1]);
  }

  return AMatrix;

}

double* generateLHS(int N, int* AMatrix, int TAPs[], long double kal)
{

  double S, C;
  S = sinl(kal);
  C = cosl(kal);
  printf("According to C, Sin(Pi/2) = %.25lf and Cos(Pi/2) = %.25lf", S, C);
  //       S = 1;
  //       C = 0;
  double* LHS;
  LHS = malloc(N * N * 2 * sizeof(double));

  if (LHS == NULL)
  {
    printf("Failed to allocate memory for LHS. Exiting.");
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < N * N; i++)
  {
    LHS[2 * i] = -1 * AMatrix[i];  
    LHS[(2 * i) + 1] = 0;
  }


  for (i = 0; i <= 2 * N * N - 2; i = i + (2 * N) + 2)
  {
    LHS[i] = LHS[i] + (2 * C); 
  }

  int j;
  for (i = 0; i <= 3; i++)
  {
    j = 2 * N * TAPs[i] + 2 * TAPs[i];
    LHS[j] = LHS[j] - C;
    LHS[j + 1] = LHS[j + 1] - S;
  }

  return LHS;
}

double* generateRHS(int N, int inputTailAttachmentPoint, long double kal)
{

  double* RHS;
  RHS = malloc(2 * N * sizeof(double));

  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < 2 * N; i++)
  {
    RHS[i] = 0.0;
  }
  RHS[2 * inputTailAttachmentPoint + 1] = - 2 * sin(kal);
  return RHS; 
}


double* solveUsingLUD(int N, double* LHS, double* RHS)
{
  int INFO; /*Info is changed by ZGELSD to 0 if the computation was carried out successfully. Else it changes to some none-zero integer. */
  int ione = 1;
  int LDA = N;
  int LDB = N;
  int n = N;
  int* IPV = malloc(N * sizeof(int));

  if (IPV == NULL)
  {
    printf("Failed to allocate memory for IPV. Exiting.");
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  zgesv_(&n, &ione, LHS, &LDA, IPV, RHS, &LDB, &INFO);
  free(IPV);

  if (INFO != 0)
  {

    printf("\n ERROR: info = %d\n", INFO); 
  }
  return RHS;
}


void printComplexVectors(int numberOfRows, double* matrix)
{
  int i;

  for (i = 0; i < 2 * numberOfRows - 1; i = i + 2)
  {
    printf("%f + %f*i    \n", matrix[i], matrix[i + 1]);
  }
  printf("\n");
}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  int N = 8;
  int* AMatrix;
  AMatrix = getA(N, argv);
  int TAPs[]={4,4,4,3};
  long double kal = PI/2;




  double *LHS, *RHS;
  LHS = generateLHS(N, AMatrix, TAPs,kal);
  int i;
  RHS = generateRHS(N, TAPs[0],kal);





  printf("\n LHS = \n{{");
  for (i = 0; i < 2 * N * N - 1;)
  {
    printf("%lf + ", LHS[i]);
    i = i + 1;
    printf("%lfI", LHS[i]);
    i = i + 1;

    if ((int)(.5 * i) % N == 0)
    {
      printf("},\n{"); 
    }
    else
    {
      printf(",");
    }
  }
  printf("}");


  double LHS2[] = {0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-0.000000,-3.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,-1.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.00000};
  double RHS2[] ={0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,-2.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000,0.000000};

  printf("comparing LHS and LHS2\n");
  for (i = 0; i < 2 * N * N;)
  {
    if (LHS[i] != LHS2[i]) {
      printf( "LHS difference at index %d\n", i);
      printf("LHS[%d] = %.16lf\n", i, LHS[i]);
  printf("LHS2[%d] = %.16lf\n", i, LHS2[i]);
  printf("The difference is %.16lf\n", LHS[i] - LHS2[i]);
    }
    i = i + 1;
  }

  printf("\n");
  printf("comparing RHS and RHS2\n");
  for (i = 0; i < 2 * N;)
  {
    if (RHS[i] != RHS2[i]) {
      printf( "RHS difference at index %d\n", i);
      printf("RHS[%d] = %.16lf\n", i, RHS[i]);
  printf("RHS2[%d] = %.16lf\n", i, RHS2[i]);
  printf("The difference is %.16lf", RHS[i] - RHS2[i]);

    }
    i = i + 1;
  }

  printf("\n");


  double *solution;

  solution = solveUsingLUD(N,LHS,RHS);
  printf("\n Solution = \n{");
  for (i = 0; i < 2 * N - 1;)
  {
    printf("{%.16lf + ", solution[i]);
    i = i + 1;
    printf("%.16lfI},", solution[i]);
    i = i + 1;
    printf("\n");
    }
    solution = solveUsingLUD(N,LHS2,RHS2);


    printf("Solution2 = \n{");
    for (i = 0; i < 2 * N - 1;)
    {
      printf("{%lf + ", solution[i]);
      i = i + 1;
      printf("%lfI},", solution[i]);
      i = i + 1;
      printf("\n");
    }


    for (i = 0; i < 2 * N * N;)
    {
      LHS[i] = LHS2[i];
      i = i + 1;
    }


    for (i = 0; i < 2 * N;)
    {
      RHS[i] = RHS2[i];
      i = i + 1;
    }
    solution = solveUsingLUD(N,LHS,RHS);

    printf("Solution3 = \n{");
    for (i = 0; i < 2 * N - 1;)
    {
      printf("{%lf + ", solution[i]);
      i = i + 1;
      printf("%lfI},", solution[i]);
      i = i + 1;
      printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
  }

I use the compile line

gcc -lm -llapack -lblas PiecesOfCprogarm.c -Wall -g

and I execute with:

./a.out 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

Which gives the output

According to C, Sin(Pi/2) = 1.0000000000000000000000000 and Cos(Pi/2) = -0.0000000000000000000271051
 LHS = 
{{-0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I,-0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-0.000000 + -1.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I},
{-1.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + -3.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I},
{-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,-1.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,0.000000 + 0.000000I,-0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{}comparing LHS and LHS2
LHS difference at index 0
LHS[0] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[0] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 18
LHS[18] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[18] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 36
LHS[36] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[36] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 54
LHS[54] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[54] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 72
LHS[72] = 0.0000000000000000
LHS2[72] = -0.0000000000000000
The difference is 0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 90
LHS[90] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[90] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 108
LHS[108] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[108] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000
LHS difference at index 126
LHS[126] = -0.0000000000000000
LHS2[126] = 0.0000000000000000
The difference is -0.0000000000000000

comparing RHS and RHS2


 Solution = 
{{1.0000000000000000 + -0.0000000000000000I},
{-1.0000000000000000 + -0.0000000000000000I},
{-0.0000000000000000 + 0.0000000000000000I},
{-0.0000000000000000 + 0.0000000000000000I},
{0.6000000000000000 + 0.2000000000000000I},
{-0.0000000000000000 + -0.0000000000000000I},
{-6854258945071195.0000000000000000 + 4042255275298396.0000000000000000I},
{6854258945071195.0000000000000000 + -4042255275298396.0000000000000000I},

 ERROR: info = 3
Solution2 = 
{{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + -2.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},

 ERROR: info = 8
Solution3 = 
{{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + -2.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
{0.000000 + 0.000000I},
share|improve this question
1  
You're right that there is a difference between and an array and a pointer but once you pass an array to a function you are just passing a pointer to its first element so inside the function there is do difference between passing a pointer to a statically allocated arrat and a dynamically allocated (e.g. with malloc) one (unless it tries to free or realloc it). I don't think you've posted enougd code to show any problems. I'm assuming that your ... aren't actually .... You can declared createRHS as double createRHS(int N, ...) but it's not valid to call it as createRHS(N, ...). –  Charles Bailey Jun 18 '11 at 8:52
    
Hi Charles, Thanks for the feedback: I've updated the main post to show you what my main() function looks like. I can show more functions if you think it will be helpful. –  BenB Jun 18 '11 at 9:40
    
Also: Yes - your assumption is right. The first code block that I posted was just a mock up to try to keep things simple. Now I've posted my actual main() function. –  BenB Jun 18 '11 at 9:47
    
Now the main post has been updated to give my full, real code. –  BenB Jun 18 '11 at 21:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

PI is not exactly representable as a double. Therefore neither is PI/2.

Therefore sin(kal) and cos(kal) are not necessarily equal to 1 or 0, respectively.

(If you are trying to fix this by assigning them to "int", remember that C typically rounds down when doing such a conversion.)

[edit]

Actually I have a better suggestion...

When compiling Fortran code with GCC, you probably want to use -ffloat-store. Fortran code is often written with careful attention to the quantization of double-precision numbers... But by default, intermediate values on x86 can have extra precision (because the floating-point unit uses 80 bits internally). Normally, the extra precision only helps, but for some numerically-sensitive code (like, say, sin(PI/2)), it can cause unexpected results.

-ffloat-store avoids this extra precision.

[edit 2, in response to comments]

To get better precision from sin and cos, I suggest the following.

First, declare kal as long double, both in main and in the argument lists to the other functions.

Second, invoke sinl() and cosl() instead of sin() and cos().

Third, define PI like this:

#define PI 3.1415926535897932384626433832795029L

Leave everything else (especially S and C) as double. See if it helps...

share|improve this answer
    
-ffloat-store isn't actually guaranteed to work (it does not guarantee to not store unnamed temporaries, and still suffers from double-rounding). On modern processors, you probably want -mfpmath=sse -msse2 instead. –  tc. Jun 19 '11 at 15:10
    
Hi there, Storing sin and cos as ints was just a silly mistake on my part. I've fixed that now, but it doesn't seem to do the trick. Neither of these tags on the command line seem to solve the problem. –  BenB Jun 20 '11 at 1:04
    
As near as I can tell, S and C are not declared at all in your current code sample... Humor me for a minute. In this sample program, kal is PI/2, right? So immediately after computing S and C, try asserting that S is 1 and C is 0. (Or just set S=1 and C=0 instead of calling sin() and cos(), and see if that makes any difference.) –  Nemo Jun 20 '11 at 1:19
    
@Nemo I'm so glad that I did humour you. That absolutely solved the problem at hand. Thank you! Now I have the other problem: C reporting Cos(Pi/2) = 10 ^ -16 causing massive instabilities in my routine. –  BenB Jun 20 '11 at 7:11
    
@Maberib: Interesting. I have edited my answer to give one more suggestion. –  Nemo Jun 20 '11 at 16:25

Here's another guess:

I wonder if inside of generateLHS() and/or generateRHS() you're generating double values with very small errors that show as zero (or at least zero in the fractional part) when you display them with printf(), but the differences affect the calcuations in zgesv_().

Can you try adding these loops to your test run just after the declarations of LHS2 and RHS2:

printf("comparing LHS and LHS2\n");
for (i = 0; i < 2 * N * N;)
{
    if (LHS[i] != LHS2[i]) {
        printf( "LHS difference at index %d\n", i);
    }
    i = i + 1;
}
printf("\n");
printf("comparing RHS and RHS2\n");
for (i = 0; i < 2 * N;)
{
    if (RHS[i] != RHS2[i]) {
        printf( "RHS difference at index %d\n", i);
    }
    i = i + 1;
}
printf("\n");
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I'm off my 1 * 10^-16. I'd be surprised if that was the source of this drastic instability - but maybe it is. I'll check to see if the solution it gives is actually the correct solution to a matrix that is adjusted by this 10^-16. –  BenB Jun 18 '11 at 21:03
    
Also - the code is now updated to be my full, real code. –  BenB Jun 18 '11 at 21:30
    
@Maberib: one quick check would be to copy the LHS2 and RHS2 arrays into the allocated arrays before calling solveUsingLUD(). –  Michael Burr Jun 18 '11 at 23:12
    
LAPACK did not give the correct solution to the matrices I was passing it. It must not like the near-singular matrices. I'll report this one to their team. –  BenB Jun 20 '11 at 7:40

You have some syntactical errors in your code (unmatched parentheses and quotes) but I suppose those slipped in when you copied the code here.

My guess is that the following could cause the problem:

solveSystemByLUD(int N, double *LHS, double* RHS, ...)
{
...
}

This declares a function that returns int but you are returning double *. Add the return type and see if anything changes.

EDIT:
After your clarification there are still some flaws - the code still cannot compile because of this line:

   * SUBROUTINE ZGESV( N, Nrhs, A, LDA, IPIV, B, LDB, INFO ) Solves A * X = B and stores the answer in B.   If the solver worked, INFO is set to 0.
   */

There is an opening comment missing.

Also you are assigning results of sin() and cos() to integer variables (C and S are integers by default):

  S = sin(kal);
  C = cos(kal);

Judging from your code this is not what you want.

The last thing to notice is that in LHS2 the last element is missing (sizeof(LHS2)/sizeof(double) is 127 instead of 2 * 8 * 8 = 128). This means you are reading and writing beyond the end of an array which causes undefined behavior and might cause the problems you see.

EDIT 2:
One more thing: you are reading argv[0] in the function getA() which is always a path to the executable. You should start reading at argv[1]. And to be safe you should check if the user supplied enough arguments (argc - 1 >= N * N).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, for %^&*'s sake. I wish I could upvote the answer more than once. This is the kind of thing that makes me hate dealing with code examples that aren't the real thing (you end up looking past little things that matter). Good catch - even if it turns out to not be the cause. But I think you've probably got it. –  Michael Burr Jun 18 '11 at 19:36
    
Sorry - I could see how using pseudocode could cause frustration. Now the real code is posted. I did actually declare those functions correctly (I think!). –  BenB Jun 18 '11 at 21:01
    
@Maberib: there's a tension between posting real code and pseudocode when the real code is long (I can't say I'm a fan of looking at questions with a wall of code either). Of course the danger of psudoecode is red herrings or that you look past omissions that might be important because you think it's omitted for space/clarity. –  Michael Burr Jun 18 '11 at 23:17
    
@Michael: Edited my answer, hopefully it moves you forward –  Karel Petranek Jun 19 '11 at 13:02
    
Ah - the S and C was an oversight. Although I've fixed it now, and it doesn't seem to solve the problem. Thanks though. In getA(), It looks to me like I'm reading argv[1 + 0] -- unless you're talking about something else. I've now fixed the missing element in LHS2 -- unfortunately, the problem still exists and zgesv responds differently to LHS and LHS2. Thanks for the tip on checking user arguments. I'll be sure to include that in the final program. –  BenB Jun 20 '11 at 0:52

First off: I come from the Fortran side of it and I have no C experience, hence what I say may or may not be relevant.

BLAS/LAPACK routines expect to receive Fortran arrays--- essentially an address of a first element of a contiguous chunk of memory. The array layout is assumed to be column-major and the size is controlled by LDA. Essentially no checks are made, so if what you're sending in does not conform to these expectations, all hell breaks loose.

What I've found from experience (or rather --- saw somebody doing it and copied it) calling LAPACK routines from C++ is that the following works: if you use an std::vector<double> to store your matrices, and invoke the LAPACK calls using &A[0] (where A is an std::vector<double>), it works. My (maybe all too naive) understanding is that the standard library vector is "a sort of like" C array, so this, I guess, can be directly translated into C.

Also, you are using complex routines, which may or may not change something in subtle ways. I would guess that Fortran's COMPLEX*16 is equivalent to struct{double real_part; double imag_part;}

Finally, the reference implementation of LAPACK routines is readily available from netlib, here http://www.netlib.org/lapack/complex16/zgesv.f

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It turns out Nemo had the solution to my problem. Of all stupid things, C was reporting Cos(Pi/2) = 10 ^ -16 and that caused my matrix solving routine to die in horrible ways. –  BenB Jun 20 '11 at 7:13
    
@Maberib: Why wouldn't you expect 1E-16? Floating-point arithmetic is imprecise, so you will get slight inaccuracies. If your matrix-solving routine was unstable to the point that 0 vs. 1E-16 mattered, it's likely to have other problems. –  David Thornley Jun 20 '11 at 20:40
    
@David: I agree. It's definitely made me wonder about the use of this routine in LAPACK. I believe there are some other LAPACK routines that have better error checking written in. I'm going to be investigating those. If those let me down, I'm going to switch libraries altogether. –  BenB Jun 20 '11 at 21:40

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