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Yet another template issue ! I'm trying to get a template method that will output an object if it has an overload for the operator <<. I have pretty much everything working, and implemented an enable_if in order to make g++ choose the intended specialization for each type of objects.

Thing is, with a non-overloaded object, it works quite fine. But with an overloaded one, both of my specialization are reasonable choices for g++, and instead of compiling it outputs me an ambiguous overload error.

Here's the code :

template<typename T>
  static void   Print(Stream& out, T& param, typename enable_if<CanPrint<T>::value>::type = 0)
  {
    out << param;
  }

  template<typename T>
  static void   Print(Stream& out, T& param)
  {
    out << "/!\\" << typeid(param).name() << " does not have any overload for <<.\n";
  }

I understand why such a thing is ambiguous. Yet I can't think of a way to make it more obvious... how do I make the compiler understand that the second overload is to be chosen only when the first cannot be ?

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3 Answers 3

You'll get the ambiguity because in both cases you have a function that takes a stream followed by your type T as the first two arguments. This works though:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>
#include <typeinfo>

template <class T>
struct CanPrint { enum { value = 0 }; };

template <>
struct CanPrint<int> { enum { value = 1 }; };

template<typename T>
typename boost::enable_if<CanPrint<T>, void>::type 
    Print(std::ostream& out, T& param)
{
    out << param << std::endl;
}

template<typename T>
typename boost::disable_if<CanPrint<T>, void>::type 
    Print(std::ostream& out, T& param)
{
    out << "/!\\" << typeid(param).name() << " does not have any overload for <<.\n";
}

int main()
{
    int i = 1;
    double d = 2;

    Print(std::cout, i);
    Print(std::cout, d);
}
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Wow o_O ! What a fool, I hadn't even thought of using the return value ! It works swell, thank you ! –  The-Snake Jun 18 '11 at 9:19
    
My +1, Nice answer. –  Alok Save Jun 18 '11 at 9:23
2  
@The-Snake The real fix is using disable_if to remove the 'wrong' overload from the overload set. –  Luc Danton Jun 18 '11 at 9:37

The ambiguity is because of the default parameter value.

Calling Print(stream, whatever) can be resolved to either the first version with the default third parameter or the second version with no third parameter.

Remove the default value, and the compiler will understand. Otherwise both of them can be chosen always.

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Yes, but that's the thing actually. How do I make it work ? –  The-Snake Jun 18 '11 at 9:09

I believe this has nothing to do with templates. A free function overloaded in this fashion would give the same ambigious error.

check this simple code example, It is similar to what you are doing in your template example:

void doSomething(int i, int j, int k );
void doSomething(int i, int j, int k = 10);


void doSomething(int i, int j, int k)
{

}

void doSomething(int i, int j)
{

}


int main()
{
    doSomething(10,20);
    return 0;
}

The error is:

prog.cpp:18: error: call of overloaded ‘doSomething(int, int)’ is ambiguous
prog.cpp:5: note: candidates are: void doSomething(int, int, int)
prog.cpp:10: note:                 void doSomething(int, int)

Clearly, You cannot overload the functions this way on just the basis of default arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
I know indeed. The true question is : how to I make SFINAE apply here ? –  The-Snake Jun 18 '11 at 9:12
    
@The-Snake: IMHO I don't think one can. –  Alok Save Jun 18 '11 at 9:16
    
with enable_if/disable_if you can. –  Node Jun 18 '11 at 9:18

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