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I want to allow my Class1 to be convertible to Class2 by a type conversion operator:

class  Class1     {
public:
    operator Class2() const {
      //....
    }
}

But if I create a Class2 object in the operator implementation, very likely it will not get deleted by the caller. So what is the best way to implement such a feature?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There only needs to be deletion if you do something crazy like this:

operator Class2() const
{
    Class2 *p = new Class2();
    ...
    return *p;
}

However, the following is fine:

operator Class2() const
{
    Class2 c2;
    ...
    return c2;
}
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Well, first snippet won't even compile as you're returning Class2* not Class2 itself. –  Ivan Danilov Jun 18 '11 at 11:01
    
@Ivan: No I'm not! –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 18 '11 at 11:01
    
Oops, sorry, I was inattentive. Didn't notice dereference. –  Ivan Danilov Jun 18 '11 at 11:02
    
@Oli, +1, but I think its worth mentioning for the OP's benefit that in the first example, the memory is allocated in the free-store, so needs explicit deleting, but in the second its allocated on the stack, so c2 gets released when operator Class2() returns, and a copy of it is passed to the caller. –  Node Jun 18 '11 at 11:06
    
What if I want to avoid the copying when returning C2 (the 2nd case)? –  JavaMan Jun 18 '11 at 11:08

You should not allocate memory on the heap but make Class2 in the stack. Then it will be destroyed on function exit.

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You should do something like this

operator Class2() const 
{
    Class2 tmp;
    ...
    return tmp;
}

Then if you have something like this

Class1 c1;
Class2 c2 = c1;

the memory for tmp will be allocated in stack, then a copy constructor of Class2 would be called to copy tmp to c2, and then the destructor of tmp would be called as it is an automatic variable.

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