Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

fibs is a std::vector. Using g++, I was advised to take fibs.size() out of the loop, to save computing it each time (because the vector could change)

int sum = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < fibs.size(); ++i){
    if(fibs[i] % 2 == 0){
        sum += fibs[i];
    }
}

Surely there is some dataflow analysis in the compiler that would tell us that fibs won't change size. Is there? Or should I set some other variable to be fibs.size() and use that in the loop condition?

share|improve this question
2  
1 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 5 + ... + F<sub>n</sub> = F<sub>n+2</sub> - 1. – Karl Knechtel Jun 18 '11 at 11:10
1  
So whoever advised you doesn't want the size to be computed each time (a subtraction in g++, prior to optimization), but doesn't mind calling operator[] (and extra addition compared with using an iterator, prior to optimization) twice. What, and indeed ever. It would be better to either look at the emitted instructions, or time it. – Steve Jessop Jun 18 '11 at 11:18
    
Steve, If i know that the size of the vector is guaranteed not to change, wouldn't it just save time to use operator[]? Also, I'm a c++ clown. So is using an iterator is faster? – oadams Jun 18 '11 at 11:50
2  
@shuttle87: I'm saying that if someone (whoever gave this advice) is going to make wild generalities about performance, I'm a little surprised that they're guessing size() is slower than accessing a variable, but they aren't guessing that operator[] is slower than using an iterator or pointer. I wouldn't guess exactly what the optimizer will do - it might actually manage to replace the index i with a pointer, but to do so it must somehow convince itself that the vector never reallocates, which is hardly any easier than convincing itself it can hoist the value of size. – Steve Jessop Jun 18 '11 at 13:45
1  
The basic issue is that operator[] will have to load the vector's base pointer out of the vector object (and add the index), just like size() on gcc loads the base and end pointers out of the vector object (and subtract them). So it's pretty much the same kind of fiddly micro-optimization in both cases. Personally I'd worry about neither of them until this code is a proven bottleneck, then inspect the emitted code. But if you're going to worry about one I think you should worry about both. – Steve Jessop Jun 18 '11 at 13:52

The compiler will likely determine that it won't change. Even if it did, size() for vectors is an O(1) operation.

share|improve this answer
1  
O(1) only says that it's bounded. It's still may be costly (well, not for a vector). – ybungalobill Jun 18 '11 at 11:15

Unless you know it's a problem, leave it as it is. First make it correct, then make it clear, then make it fast (if necessary).

vector::size is extremely fast anyway. It seems to me likely that the compiler will optimise this case, since it is fairly obvious that the vector is not modified and all the functions called will be inlined so the compiler can tell.

You could always look at the generated code to see if this has happened.

If you do want to change it, you need to be able to measure the time it takes before and after. That's a fair amount of work - you probably have better things to do.

share|improve this answer

size() is constant time operation, there's no penalty calling it this way. If you are concerned about performance and a more general way to go through the collection, use iterators:

int sum = 0;
for(auto it = fibs.cbegin(); it != fibs.cend(); ++it) {
    if((*it) % 2 == 0){
        sum += *it;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think you are missing another, more important point here: Is this loop causing a slow-down of your application? If you do not know for sure (i.e. if you haven't profiled), you risk focusing on the wrong parts of your application.

You already have to keep thousands of things in your head when writing programs (coding guidelines, architecture (bigger picture) of your application, variable names, function names, class names, readability, etc.), you can ignore the speed of the code during your initial implementation (in at least 95% of the time). This will allow you to focus on things, which are more important and far more valuable (like correctness, readability and maintainability).

share|improve this answer

In your example the compiler can easily analyze the flow and determine that it doesn't change. In more complicated code it cannot:

for(int i = 0; i < fibs.size(); ++i){
    complicated_function();
}

complicated_function can change fibs. However, since the above code involves a function call, the compiler cannot store fibs.size() in a register and hence you cannot eliminate the memory access.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.