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I'm trying to sort an array of numbers that are strings and I'd like them to sort numerically.

The catch is that I cannot convert the numbers into int.

Here is the code:

string[] things= new string[] { "105", "101", "102", "103", "90" };

foreach (var thing in things.OrderBy(x => x))
{
    Console.WriteLine(thing);
}

output: 101, 102, 103, 105, 90

I'd like: 90, 101, 102, 103, 105

EDIT: The output can't be 090, 101, 102...

Updated the code sample to say "things" instead of "sizes". The array can be something like this:

string[] things= new string[] { "paul", "bob", "lauren", "007", "90" };

That means it needs to be sorted alphabetically and by number:

007, 90, bob, lauren, paul

share|improve this question
7  
Why can't you convert them to int? – Femaref Jun 18 '11 at 13:36
    
"sizes" can be something else like "name". The code sample is just simplified. – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 14:52
2  
Will any of the numbers be negative? Will they all be integers? What's the range of the integers? – Eric Lippert Jun 18 '11 at 15:53
    
"things" can be any kind of string. I'd like the list to be sorted logically to a non computer literate person. Negative numbers should be before postive. In terms of string length, it wont be more than 100 chars. – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 17:21
4  
How far do you want to go? Should image10 come after image2? Should January come before February? – svick Jun 18 '11 at 18:32

15 Answers 15

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Pass a custom comparer into OrderBy. Enumerable.OrderBy will let you specify any comparer you like.

This is one way to do that:

void Main()
{
    string[] things= new string[] { "paul", "bob", "lauren", "007", "90", "101"};

    foreach (var thing in things.OrderBy(x => x, new SemiNumericComparer()))
    {    
        Console.WriteLine(thing);
    }
}


public class SemiNumericComparer: IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string s1, string s2)
    {
        if (IsNumeric(s1) && IsNumeric(s2))
        {
            if (Convert.ToInt32(s1) > Convert.ToInt32(s2)) return 1;
            if (Convert.ToInt32(s1) < Convert.ToInt32(s2)) return -1;
            if (Convert.ToInt32(s1) == Convert.ToInt32(s2)) return 0;
        }

        if (IsNumeric(s1) && !IsNumeric(s2))
            return -1;

        if (!IsNumeric(s1) && IsNumeric(s2))
            return 1;

        return string.Compare(s1, s2, true);
    }

    public static bool IsNumeric(object value)
    {
        try {
            int i = Convert.ToInt32(value.ToString());
            return true; 
        }
        catch (FormatException) {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
For the input given, this produces the same result as Recursive's answer, which involves PadLeft(). I'm assuming your input is actually more complex than this example shows, in which case a custom comparer is the way to go. – Jeff Paulsen Jun 18 '11 at 16:22
    
Cheers. This solution works and seems like an easy to read and clean way to implement. +1 for showing me you can use IComparer on OrderBy :) – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 20:31
3  
The IsNumeric method is bad, an Exception driven coding is always bad. Use int.TryParse instead. Try your code with a large list and it will take forever. – Heidel Ber Gensis Oct 25 '15 at 8:26

Just pad with zeroes to the same length:

int maxlen = sizes.Max(x => x.Length);
sizes.OrderBy(x => x.PadLeft(maxlen, '0'));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for simple solution, nitpicking would (already done in edit, nice) – Marino Šimić Jun 18 '11 at 14:17
    
+1 awesome trick I think "SO" add new button I like it............... – Pranay Rana Jun 18 '11 at 14:17
    
Nice idea but the next catch is that I need to diplay these values so the "90" needs to be a "90", not "090" – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 14:50
5  
@sf: Try it, you might like the result. Remember, the order key is not the thing being ordered. If I said to order a list of customers by last name, then I get a list of customers, not a list of last names. If you say to order a list of strings by a transformed string then the result is the ordered list of original strings, not transformed strings. – Eric Lippert Jun 18 '11 at 15:49
5  
Nice try. Unfortunately doesn't work for negative numbers.. – Duncan Edwards Apr 5 '12 at 9:48

And, how about this ...

string[] sizes = new string[] { "105", "101", "102", "103", "90" };

var size = from x in sizes
           orderby x.Length, x
           select x;

foreach (var p in size)
{
    Console.WriteLine(p);
}
share|improve this answer
    
hehe, i really like this one - very clever. Sorry if i didnt provide the full set of initial data – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 21:42
3  
Clever and awesome, thanks. – Jesse Apr 5 '12 at 23:16
3  
This is just like the pad option above only much better IMO. – dudeNumber4 Jul 1 '13 at 15:08
    
var size = sizes.OrderBy(x => x.Length).ThenBy(x => x); – Phillip Davis Apr 16 '15 at 18:43

This seems a weird request and deserves a weird solution:

string[] sizes = new string[] { "105", "101", "102", "103", "90" };

foreach (var size in sizes.OrderBy(x => {
    double sum = 0;
    int position = 0;
    foreach (char c in x.ToCharArray().Reverse()) {
        sum += (c - 48) * (int)(Math.Pow(10,position));
        position++;
    }
    return sum;
}))

{
    Console.WriteLine(size);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I meant 0x30 of course. Also, the array still could contain a non-numeric string, for which the solution will produce interesting results. – Femaref Jun 18 '11 at 13:56
    
And note that the -48 or not changes absolutely nothing, we could directly use the integer value of the char, so remove that -48 if it bothers you... – Marino Šimić Jun 18 '11 at 13:59
    
You converted to integer... – recursive Jun 18 '11 at 13:59
    
The char value is 0x30, if you convert that to int, it will still be 0x30, which isn't the number 0. – Femaref Jun 18 '11 at 14:01
    
The only thing converted to integer is the double that is returned from Math.Pow – Marino Šimić Jun 18 '11 at 14:01

You say you cannot convert the numbers into int because the array can contain elements that cannot be converted to int, but there is no harm in trying:

string[] things = new string[] { "105", "101", "102", "103", "90", "paul", "bob", "lauren", "007", "90" };
Array.Sort(things, CompareThings);

foreach (var thing in things)
    Debug.WriteLine(thing);

Then compare like this:

private static int CompareThings(string x, string y)
{
    int intX, intY;
    if (int.TryParse(x, out intX) && int.TryParse(y, out intY))
        return intX.CompareTo(intY);

    return x.CompareTo(y);
}

Output: 007, 90, 90, 101, 102, 103, 105, bob, lauren, paul

share|improve this answer
    
Btw, I used Array.Sort for simplicity, but you could use the same logic in an IComparer and use OrderBy. – Ulf Kristiansen May 15 '14 at 18:48
    
This solution seems faster then using IComparer (my opinion). 15000 result and I feel this yields about a second difference. – Jason Foglia May 8 '15 at 14:11

Value is a string

List = List.OrderBy(c => c.Value.Length).ThenBy(c => c.Value).ToList();

Works

share|improve this answer
    
Simple and works like charm.. – Femil Shajin Aug 21 '15 at 9:01
    
This answer is my favorite. – LacOniC Jan 14 at 17:28

try this

sizes.OrderBy(x => Convert.ToInt32(x)).ToList<string>();

Note: this will helpful when all are string convertable to int.....

share|improve this answer
    
this kinda converts the string to an int. – Femaref Jun 18 '11 at 13:39
    
i knew it.............................. – Pranay Rana Jun 18 '11 at 13:41
    
nope, sorry. It has to stay as a string – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 14:51
    
@sf - convert it back to string .......... – Pranay Rana Jun 18 '11 at 15:32
    
"sizes" can also be non numeric – sf. Jun 18 '11 at 15:46

Try this :

string[] things= new string[] { "105", "101", "102", "103", "90" };

int tmpNumber;

foreach (var thing in (things.Where(xx => int.TryParse(xx, out tmpNumber)).OrderBy(xx =>     int.Parse(xx))).Concat(things.Where(xx => !int.TryParse(xx, out tmpNumber)).OrderBy(xx => xx)))
{
    Console.WriteLine(thing);
}
share|improve this answer
Try this out..  



  string[] things = new string[] { "paul", "bob", "lauren", "007", "90", "-10" };

        List<int> num = new List<int>();
        List<string> str = new List<string>();
        for (int i = 0; i < things.Count(); i++)
        {

            int result;
            if (int.TryParse(things[i], out result))
            {
                num.Add(result);
            }
            else
            {
                str.Add(things[i]);
            }


        }

Now Sort the lists and merge them back...

        var strsort = from s in str
                      orderby s.Length
                      select s;

        var numsort = from n in num
                     orderby n
                     select n;

        for (int i = 0; i < things.Count(); i++)
        {

         if(i < numsort.Count())
             things[i] = numsort.ElementAt(i).ToString();
             else
             things[i] = strsort.ElementAt(i - numsort.Count());               
               }

I jsut tried to make a contribution in this interesting question...

share|improve this answer

Even though this is an old question, I'd like to give a solution:

string[] things= new string[] { "105", "101", "102", "103", "90" };

foreach (var thing in things.OrderBy(x => Int32.Parse(x) )
{
    Console.WriteLine(thing);
}

Woha quite simple right? :D

share|improve this answer

This site discusses alphanumeric sorting and will sort the numbers in a logical sense instead of an ASCII sense. It also takes into account the alphas around it:

http://www.dotnetperls.com/alphanumeric-sorting

EXAMPLE:

  • C:/TestB/333.jpg
  • 11
  • C:/TestB/33.jpg
  • 1
  • C:/TestA/111.jpg
  • 111F
  • C:/TestA/11.jpg
  • 2
  • C:/TestA/1.jpg
  • 111D
  • 22
  • 111Z
  • C:/TestB/03.jpg

  • 1
  • 2
  • 11
  • 22
  • 111D
  • 111F
  • 111Z
  • C:/TestA/1.jpg
  • C:/TestA/11.jpg
  • C:/TestA/111.jpg
  • C:/TestB/03.jpg
  • C:/TestB/33.jpg
  • C:/TestB/333.jpg

The code is as follows:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var arr = new string[]
        {
           "C:/TestB/333.jpg",
           "11",
           "C:/TestB/33.jpg",
           "1",
           "C:/TestA/111.jpg",
           "111F",
           "C:/TestA/11.jpg",
           "2",
           "C:/TestA/1.jpg",
           "111D",
           "22",
           "111Z",
           "C:/TestB/03.jpg"
        };
        Array.Sort(arr, new AlphaNumericComparer());
        foreach(var e in arr) {
            Console.WriteLine(e);
        }
    }
}

public class AlphaNumericComparer : IComparer
{
    public int Compare(object x, object y)
    {
        string s1 = x as string;
        if (s1 == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }
        string s2 = y as string;
        if (s2 == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        int len1 = s1.Length;
        int len2 = s2.Length;
        int marker1 = 0;
        int marker2 = 0;

        // Walk through two the strings with two markers.
        while (marker1 < len1 && marker2 < len2)
        {
            char ch1 = s1[marker1];
            char ch2 = s2[marker2];

            // Some buffers we can build up characters in for each chunk.
            char[] space1 = new char[len1];
            int loc1 = 0;
            char[] space2 = new char[len2];
            int loc2 = 0;

            // Walk through all following characters that are digits or
            // characters in BOTH strings starting at the appropriate marker.
            // Collect char arrays.
            do
            {
                space1[loc1++] = ch1;
                marker1++;

                if (marker1 < len1)
                {
                    ch1 = s1[marker1];
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            } while (char.IsDigit(ch1) == char.IsDigit(space1[0]));

            do
            {
                space2[loc2++] = ch2;
                marker2++;

                if (marker2 < len2)
                {
                    ch2 = s2[marker2];
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            } while (char.IsDigit(ch2) == char.IsDigit(space2[0]));

            // If we have collected numbers, compare them numerically.
            // Otherwise, if we have strings, compare them alphabetically.
            string str1 = new string(space1);
            string str2 = new string(space2);

            int result;

            if (char.IsDigit(space1[0]) && char.IsDigit(space2[0]))
            {
                int thisNumericChunk = int.Parse(str1);
                int thatNumericChunk = int.Parse(str2);
                result = thisNumericChunk.CompareTo(thatNumericChunk);
            }
            else
            {
                result = str1.CompareTo(str2);
            }

            if (result != 0)
            {
                return result;
            }
        }
        return len1 - len2;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The answer given by Jeff Paulsen is correct but the Comprarer can be much simplified to this:

public class SemiNumericComparer: IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string s1, string s2)
    {
        if (IsNumeric(s1) && IsNumeric(s2))
          return Convert.ToInt32(s1) - Convert.ToInt32(s2)

        if (IsNumeric(s1) && !IsNumeric(s2))
            return -1;

        if (!IsNumeric(s1) && IsNumeric(s2))
            return 1;

        return string.Compare(s1, s2, true);
    }

    public static bool IsNumeric(object value)
    {
        int result;
        return Int32.TryParse(value, out result);
    }
}

This works because the only thing that is checked for the result of the Comparer is if the result is larger, smaller or equal to zero. One can simply subtract the values from another and does not have to handle the return values.

Also the IsNumeric method should not have to use a try-block and can benefit from TryParse.

And for those who are not sure: This Comparer will sort values so, that non numeric values are always appended to the end of the list. If one wants them at the beginning the second and third if block have to be swapped.

share|improve this answer

My preferred solution (if all strings are numeric only):

// Order by numerical order: (Assertion: all things are numeric strings only) 
foreach (var thing in things.OrderBy(int.Parse))
{
    Console.Writeline(thing);
}
share|improve this answer
public class Test
{
    public void TestMethod()
    {
        List<string> buyersList = new List<string>() { "5", "10", "1", "str", "3", "string" };
        List<string> soretedBuyersList = null;

        soretedBuyersList = new List<string>(SortedList(buyersList));
    }

    public List<string> SortedList(List<string> unsoredList)
    {
        return unsoredList.OrderBy(o => o, new SortNumericComparer()).ToList();
    }
}

   public class SortNumericComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        int xInt = 0;
        int yInt = 0;
        int result = -1;

        if (!int.TryParse(x, out xInt))
        {
            result = 1;
        }

        if(int.TryParse(y, out yInt))
        {
            if(result == -1)
            {
                result = xInt - yInt;
            }
        }
        else if(result == 1)
        {
             result = string.Compare(x, y, true);
        }

        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain your code? Code-only answers are liable to be deleted. – Wai Ha Lee Oct 1 '15 at 17:09
    
Jeff Paulsen post helped me to Implement IComparer<string> to fix my soring issue. . – kumar Oct 1 '15 at 19:13

I guess this will be much more good if it has some numeric in the string. Hope it will help.

PS:I'm not sure about performance or complicated string values but it worked good something like this:

lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum 1
lorem ipsum 2
lorem ipsum 3
...
lorem ipsum 20
lorem ipsum 21

public class SemiNumericComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string s1, string s2)
    {
        int s1r, s2r;
        var s1n = IsNumeric(s1, out s1r);
        var s2n = IsNumeric(s2, out s2r);

        if (s1n && s2n) return s1r - s2r;
        else if (s1n) return -1;
        else if (s2n) return 1;

        var num1 = Regex.Match(s1, @"\d+$");
        var num2 = Regex.Match(s2, @"\d+$");

        var onlyString1 = s1.Remove(num1.Index, num1.Length);
        var onlyString2 = s2.Remove(num2.Index, num2.Length);

        if (onlyString1 == onlyString2)
        {
            if (num1.Success && num2.Success) return Convert.ToInt32(num1.Value) - Convert.ToInt32(num2.Value);
            else if (num1.Success) return 1;
            else if (num2.Success) return -1;
        }

        return string.Compare(s1, s2, true);
    }

    public bool IsNumeric(string value, out int result)
    {
        return int.TryParse(value, out result);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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