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Let's say I type

a = [1, 2]

in a .py file in vim and when I type "a." and hit TAB, I would like to get suggestion menu that is related to lists.

Edit 1 in response to Robin's comment: I think it's possible in vim, because there is a plugin that checks if a given python code is a valid code (I don't know what the plugin is called). Take a look:

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share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Recent versions of vim come with an omnicompletion script called pythoncomplete.

Open up a python file, and type

:set completefunc?

to check what the current completion function is. If you get back

completefunc=

then no completionfunction is currently set. You can set pythoncomplete to be the completion function by typing

:set completefunc=pythoncomplete#Complete

and you can set this to be the default for python files using (in your vimrc)

autocmd FileType python set completefunc=pythoncomplete#Complete

Now when you're in vim, you can use omnicomplete using Ctrl+X Ctrl+O and you should get a popup menu as shown below:

list completion

You can also bind this to the tab key in insert mode with (in your vimrc):

inoremap <Tab> <C-x><C-o>

To find out more about interacting with the dropdown menu that appears, try

:help ins-completion
share|improve this answer
    
I think that's the answer. I have another question, though: "How do I automatically get rid of the extra documentation window that opens up at the top ([Scratch] [Preview])?". – user126284 Jun 18 '11 at 15:38
2  
Check :set completeopt?. The option 'preview' in there makes the preview window appear with the docstring in it. If you set completeopt without preview it should no longer appear. – actionshrimp Jun 18 '11 at 15:49
2  
@Spiritwalker also see info.birnamdesigns.com/wiki/… a tip on how to auto-close the preview window when you leave insert mode or move your cursor (I prefer the insert mode method) – Michael Berkowski Jun 18 '11 at 20:32
    
@Michael, thanks for the link. I think you have to remove 'for' at the end of your link. – user126284 Jun 18 '11 at 22:10
    
Oh you're right. I wonder how I did that. Here's the correct link: info.birnamdesigns.com/wiki/… – Michael Berkowski Jun 18 '11 at 22:12

Read one of the many blog posts on setting up Vim as a Python IDE. Here's one to get you started. In particular, you are interested in the OmniComplete function.

This is bound by default to the keystroke Ctrl-xCtrl-o but you can rebind it to the tab key.

Note that it is not sensitive to the type of a variable. It can complete for you if you type:

string.<ctl-x><ctl-o>

you'll get a list of the string object methods. But if you do as you described in your question something like:

x = "a string"

x.<ctl-x><ctl-o>

vim will not know that the variable x holds a string, and will not be able to supply a list of methods.

For information on omnicomplete:

:help omnifunc
share|improve this answer
    
so it is not possible? – user126284 Jun 18 '11 at 15:16
1  
@Spiritwalker If it is possible, I do not know how to do it. I would welcome really another answer that could prove me wrong, because that would be quite useful. – Michael Berkowski Jun 18 '11 at 15:17
1  
3  
The only way to find out what you can do with an object is evaluating everything --- which means it is more suited for an interactive interpreter interface such as IDLE, where it is already know what a refers to. – Robin Jun 18 '11 at 15:20

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