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I am using Ruby on Rails 3.0.7 and I am trying to minimize database hitting. In order to do that I retrieve from the database all Article objects related to a User and then perform a search on those retrieved objects.

What I do is:

stored_objects = Article.where(:user_id => <id>) # => ActiveRecord::Relation

<some_iterative_function_1>.each { |...|
  stored_object = stored_objects.where(:status => 'published').limit(1)
  ...
  # perform operation on the current 'stored_object' considered
}    
<some_iterative_function_2>.each { |...|
  stored_object = stored_objects.where(:visibility => 'public').limit(1)
  ...
  # perform operation on the current 'stored_object' considered
} 
<some_iterative_function_n>.each { |...|
  ...
}

The stored_object = stored_objects.where(:status => 'published') code will really avoid to hitting the database (I ask this because in my log file it seams still run a database query for each iteration)? If no, how can I minimize database hitting?

P.S.: in few words, what I would like to do is to work on the ActiveRecord::Relation (an array of ) but the where method called on it seams to hit the database.

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If you're really doing a search like you mentioned, you should be using a search-specific solution like Solr. They are much better at handling this than an RDBMS or an in-app solution. –  coreyward Jun 18 '11 at 16:30
    
I have no idea if that is the case there but be careful with premature optimizations, from the my experience with atciverecord you usually pass most of your time in the ruby code and not in the database as long as you have proper indexes in place. –  Schmurfy Jun 18 '11 at 16:46
    
@Schmurfy - Can you be more clear? –  user502052 Jun 18 '11 at 16:49
1  
What I mean is that if you want all visible items for a user and then later all the published item (and maybe others) in most case you better do the full query each time and not bother, otherwise you will make your code more complex and there may be no gain or even performance loss. (Again I am speaking about the general case but benchmarking it before coding an optimization which may not be one might be well worth it) –  Schmurfy Jun 18 '11 at 16:56
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rails has functionality to grab chunks of the database at one time, then iterate over the rows without having to hit the database again.

See "Retrieving Multiple Objects in Batches" for more information about find_each and find_in_batches.

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Once you start iterating over stored_objects (if that's what you're doing), they'll be loaded from the database. If you want to load only the users's published articles, you could do this:

stored_objects = Article.where(:user_id => id, :status => 'published')

If you instead want to load published and unpublished articles and do something different with the published ones, you could do this:

stored_objects = Article.where(:user_id => id)
stored_objects.find_all { |a| a.status == 'published' }. each do |a|
    # ... do something with a published article
end

Or perhaps:

Article.where(:user_id => id).each do |article|
    case article.status
    when 'published'
        # ... do something with a published article
    else
        # ... do something with an article that's not published
    end
end

Each of these examples performs only one database query. Choosing which one depends on which data you really want to work with.

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perhaps you should add some limit, or you'll hit memory. –  Andrea Pavoni Jun 18 '11 at 16:26
    
I need to consider each 'stored_object' singly also to run on those other operations. Moreover, I need to find 'Article' objects based on other attibute values... this is why I would like to retrieve all Articles related to a User and then handle those without hitting the database every time. –  user502052 Jun 18 '11 at 16:26
    
Maybe I misunderstood the question. You can chain Relation's where method calls indefinitely without hitting the database, but as soon as you try to examine a result it'll need to go get one. –  Rob Davis Jun 18 '11 at 16:44
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