Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
how can i get around declaring an unused variable in a for loop

In Python, particularly with a for-loop, is there a way to not create a variable if you don't care about it, ie the i in this example which isn't needed:

for i in range(10):
    print('Hello')
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by delnan, bgporter, tzot, Gilles, John Saunders Jun 20 '11 at 18:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You make a good point! It was a frustratingly hard thing to search for. –  Dean Barnes Jun 18 '11 at 17:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, but often you will find that _ is used instead:

for _ in range(10):
    print('Hello')

You only have to be careful when you use gettext.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Dean: Your question illustrates why you should never use this variable name :) –  Sven Marnach Jun 18 '11 at 16:57
1  
@Dean Barnes It has no particular meaning. Since _ is also a magic variable in the interactive shell (always contains the result of the last expression), it's well-suited as a dummy variabnle. –  phihag Jun 18 '11 at 16:57
1  
@Dean Take a look at this question: link –  K4emic Jun 18 '11 at 16:58
1  
@Dean: It is not special, it is a valid identifier –  Felix Kling Jun 18 '11 at 16:59
1  
@Dean, there is nothing special about '_', but it is a common convention in Python to use it in this manner for throwaway variables. –  Corey Goldberg Jun 18 '11 at 17:17

A for-loop always creates a name. If you don't want to use it, just make this clear by its name, for example call it dummy. Some people also use the name _ for an unused variable, but I wouldn't recommend this name because it tends to confuse people, making them think this is some special kind of syntax. Furthermore, it clashes with the name _ in the interactive interpreter and with the common gettext alias of the same name.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for mentioning possible gettext conflict –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 18 '11 at 21:53

I've seen people use _ as a throw-away variable. I tend to just use i and not use it.

share|improve this answer

Just use a variable name you don't care about. This could be dummy or the often-seen _.

share|improve this answer

Yes:

from __future__ import print_function
print(*['Hello']*10, sep='\n')

But you should prefer the for loop for readability

share|improve this answer
    
It didn't click, but print('Hello\n' * 10, end='') would also work. Good thinking :) –  Dean Barnes Jun 18 '11 at 17:02

Try this little arabesqsue.

print "Hello\n"*10
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.