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I been working in a new project but I encounter with a problem which I can't see why fail.

When I perfom this line delete textY give me the error _Block_Type_Is_Valid (pHead->nBlockUse). So what am I doing wrong?

This is the source code:

Text.h

 #ifndef TEXT_H
 #define TEXT_H

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Font>  FontPtr;

class Text
{
public:

    Text(FontPtr font, char *text)
    {
        str = new char[35];
        this->font = font;    str = text; 
    }

    Text(const Text& cSource);
    Text& operator=(const Text& cSource);

    ~Text();
    .
    .
    .
    .

private:
    FontPtr font;
    char *str;
    GLuint texture;
    GLfloat pos_x, pos_y, width, height;
};

 #endif 

Text.cpp

Text::Text(const Text& cSource)
{
    font = cSource.font;
    texture = cSource.texture;
    pos_x = cSource.pos_x;
    pos_y = cSource.pos_y;
    width = cSource.width;
    height = cSource.height;

    int sizeString = 35;
    if (cSource.str)
    {
        str = new char[sizeString];
        strncpy(str, cSource.str, sizeString);
    }

    else 
    {
        str = 0;
    }
}

Text& Text::operator=(const Text& cSource)
{
    delete[] str;

    font = cSource.font;
    texture = cSource.texture;
    pos_x = cSource.pos_x;
    pos_y = cSource.pos_y;
    width = cSource.width;
    height = cSource.height;

    int sizeString = 35;
    if (cSource.str)
    {
        str = new char[sizeString];
        strncpy(str, cSource.str, sizeString);
    }

    else 
    {
        str = 0;
    }

    return *this;
}

Text::~Text()
{
    delete[] str;
}

Font.h

#ifndef FONT_H
#define FONT_H

class Font
{
public:

    Font(TTF_Font *font, SDL_Color color)
    {
        this->font = font;    this->color = color; 
    }

    ~Font();
    .
    .
    .

private:
    TTF_Font *font;
    SDL_Color color;

};

#endif

Font.cpp

Font::~Font()
{
    TTF_CloseFont(font);
}

CGameApplication.cpp

.
.
.
.
void CGameApplication::initializeApplicationFonts()
{
    TTF_Font* font;
    SDL_Color color;

    font = TTF_OpenFont("test.ttf", 15);

    color.r = color.g = color.b = 255;

    GApp->addFont(font, color);

    Text *text = new Text(GApp->getFonts().at(0), " ");
    text->setTexture( CTextM->textToGLTexture(GApp->getFonts().at(0), text) );
    text->setPosX(20);  text->setPosY(20);

    GApp->addText(new Text(*text));

    Text *textY = new Text(GApp->getFonts().at(0), " ");
    textY->setTexture( CTextM->textToGLTexture(GApp->getFonts().at(0), textY) );
    textY->setPosX(80);  textY->setPosY(20);

    GApp->addText(new Text(*textY));
    delete textY;                 //-----> This line crashes the program with that error
}
.
.
.

GameApp.h

#ifndef GAMEAPP_H
#define GAMEAPP_H


class GameApp
{
public:
    GameApp(){
    }

    //~GameApp();

    void addFont(TTF_Font *font, SDL_Color color) { 
        vFonts.push_back(FontPtr( new Font(font, color) ) ); }

    vector<FontPtr> getFonts() { return vFonts; }

    void addText(Text *text) { 
        vTexts.push_back(new Text(*text));}

private:
    SDL_Surface *gameMainSurface;
    vector<Image*> vImages; 
    std::vector<FontPtr> vFonts;
    vector<Text*> vTexts;
    vector<Tile*> vTiles;
    Map *currentMap;
};

#endif

So I think the problem is that when I destroy the object textY, the pointer to the TTF_Font is destroyed. But I'm not sure because when I add a object Text in the vector I use a copy-constructor so the different pointers got copy without problems.

share|improve this question
    
Did you walk up the call stack to see which was the last call in your code that caused the debugging failure? (Also, Raw Pointers in STL containers! My eyes! :) ) – Billy ONeal Jun 18 '11 at 17:07
    
Yes, it's only a test while I implement smart pointers in all the STL containers. I going to check the call stack. Thanks. – oscar.rpr Jun 18 '11 at 17:13
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just use a std::string. That error means that you double deleted something, or something like that, a problem that you wouldn't have if you didn't manage your own memory. Your code is littered with memory leaks and other bugs that you won't have with std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. I changed all the char* for std::string and work without problem. And expected it's not problem if I ask, if there is a problem in use raw pointers in STL containers, I was thinking in use auto_ptr in some of them, and shared_ptr in other objects that it's needed, it is really neccesary? – oscar.rpr Jun 18 '11 at 17:26
    
@oscar.rpr: You can't use auto_ptr in Standard containers. This problem will be fixed in C++11, but in C++03, you will have to use shared_ptr- even if there's only ever one reference. – Puppy Jun 18 '11 at 18:21
    
Thanks for the help, so I will use shared_ptr instead of raw pointers in STL containers. – oscar.rpr Jun 18 '11 at 18:37
5  
"a problem that you wouldn't have if you didn't manage your own memory" i hate this sentiment in a world of garbage collectors and reference counting that is more difficult to debug. sure string is a special case, but the right answer here is "a problem that you wouldn't have if you managed your memory properly". – jheriko Oct 15 '13 at 11:01
1  
@jheriko: There's a world of difference between garbage collectors and reference counting, and std::string/std::vector. Don't manage your own memory manually. That's just going to lead to infinity bugs. – Puppy Feb 25 '15 at 23:02

From what I can see, the error has to do with the default ctor for Text. You take in a char* pointer, allocate space for the string, but don't actually copy the text into str, but simply assign the pointer! You do it correct in the copy ctor though. Now, consider this example:

class Foo{
public:
    Foo(char* text){
        str = text;
    }

    ~Foo(){
        delete str;
    }

private:
    char* str;
};

int main(){
    Foo f("hi");
}

C++03 (for backwards compatability...) allows literal strings ("hi") to bind to non-const char* pointers, as seen in this code. C++11 thankfully fixed that and this should actually no longer compile. Now, deleting a literal string obviously doesn't work, as the string is placed in the read-only section of the .exe and as such isn't deleteable. I guess this is where your error comes from, if you instantiate a Text object from a literal string.

Note that this also happens if you create it from a char[] created on the stack:

char text[] = "hi";
Foo f(text);

as the Foo will now try to delete a stack-object.

Another case where this might happen is if you double-delete an object:

char* text = new char[3];
Foo f(text);
delete text;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I already solved the problem changing every char * to std::string, because it's was causing a memory leak and other problems. – oscar.rpr Jun 18 '11 at 17:27

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