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I'm have a wierd error in my code. It's extremely rare (happens once every few weeks maybe), but it's there and I'm not sure why.

We have 2 threads running, 1 thread gets networked messages and adds them to a Queue like this:

DataMessages.Enqueue(new DataMessage(client, msg));

Another thread takes messages off this queue and handles them, like this:

while (NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Count > 0)
{
    DataMessage message = NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Dequeue();

    switch (message.messageType)
    {
       ...
    }
}

However once every so often I get a NullReferenceException on the line switch (message.messageType) and I can see in the debugger that message is null.

It is not possible that a null value was put onto the queue (see the first bit of code), and these are the only 2 things that use the queue.

Is Queue not thread-safe, could it be that I'm dequeuing at the exact moment that the other thread is enqueuing and this causes the glitch?

share|improve this question
    
very few things in the .NET BCL are thread-safe in this fashion. In this case, "to guarantee the thread safety of the Queue, all operations must be done through the wrapper returned by the Synchronized method". Your problem could also be that two threads are enqueueing or dequeueing simultaneously, if applicable. Either way, thread-safety is your responsibility. –  bzlm Jun 18 '11 at 17:10
    
+1, Good question, it really demonstrates a race condition and its outcome (corrupted/unstable/unexpected situation). –  Ron Klein Jun 18 '11 at 17:16
    
By the looks of your code, it looks like you're just doing a naive loop for your threads. You should look into implementing a proper bounded-buffer to synchronize this. –  Jeff Mercado Jun 19 '11 at 19:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
    while (NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Count > 0)
    {
        // once every two weeks a context switch happens to be here.
        DataMessage message = NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Dequeue();

        switch (message.messageType)
        {
           ...
        }
    }

... and when you get that context switch in that location, the result of the first expression (NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Count > 0) is true for both threads, and the one that get's to the Dequeue() operation first get's the object and the second thread get's a null (instead of InvalidOperationException because the Queue's internal state wasn't fully updated to throw the right exception).

Now you have two options:

  1. Use the .NET 4.0 ConcurrentQueue

  2. Refactor your code:

and make it look somehow like this:

while(true)
{
  DataMessage message = null;

  lock(NetworkingClient.DataMessages.SyncRoot) {
       if(NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Count > 0) {
          message = NetworkingClient.DataMessages.Dequeue();
       } else {
         break;
       }
    }
    // .. rest of your code
}

Edit: updated to reflect Heandel's comment.

share|improve this answer
2  
You could use the Queue's SyncRoot object for _sync. That's its purpose! –  dolan Jun 18 '11 at 17:22
    
You're totally right. Thanks! –  Karim Agha Jun 18 '11 at 17:28
    
the question does say "Another thread takes messages off this queue and handles them". This would mean a simultaneous dequeue from 2 threads would never happen. #justsaying –  bzlm Jun 18 '11 at 17:43

Is Queue not thread-safe, could it be that I'm dequeuing at the exact moment that the other thread is enqueuing and this causes the glitch?

Exactly. Queue is not thread-safe. A thread-safe queue is System.Collections.Concurrent.ConcurrentQueue. Use it instead to fix your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't even know about this ConcurrentQueue - allways used lock... –  VikciaR Jun 18 '11 at 17:17
    
It is new in .NET 4 ;) –  ba__friend Jun 18 '11 at 17:34
2  
Don’t use ConcurrentQueue blindly; only use it if you know what you’re doing. In some situations a Queue with locks is a better choice. The concurrent collection classes are not miracle cures for concurrency woes :) –  Timwi Jun 18 '11 at 20:04

In case you are interested in the exact reason:

Enqueue looks like this:

this._array[this._tail] = item;
this._tail = (this._tail + 1) % this._array.Length;
this._size++;
this._version++;

And Dequeue like this:

T result = this._array[this._head];
this._array[this._head] = default(T);
this._head = (this._head + 1) % this._array.Length;
this._size--;
this._version++;

The race goes like this:

  • There is 1 element in a queue (head == tail) so your reader thread starts dequeuing but is interrupted after the first line in Dequeue
  • Then another element is enqueued and put at position tail which is equal to head at this point.
  • Now Dequeue resumes and overwrites the element which was just inserted by Enqueue with default(T)
  • The next time you call dequeue you get the default(T) (in your case null) instead of the actual value
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, it's nice to see exactly what is happening behind the scenes. I guess I should be more careful when multithreading! I'm glad I found this bug and it won't make it into the release. –  Hannesh Jun 19 '11 at 22:14

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