Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry for this very vague title, it's very hard to describe.

The error I'm stuck with is this, I have no idea what it means:

carray.h:176: error: ‘typename Carray<T, Allocator>::is_iterator’ names ‘template<class T, class Allocator> template<class I, bool check> struct Carray<T, Allocator>::is_iterator’, which is not a type

I have this snippet to detect if something is an iterator and use the correct overload (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6050441/why-does-this-constructor-overload-resolve-incorrectly). This compiles:

template<class T> class Carray {
private:
    // uses SFINAE to determine if the passed in type is indeed an iterator
    template<class It>
    class is_iterator_impl {
    private:
        typedef char yes[1];
        typedef char no[2];

        template<class C>
        static yes& _test(typename C::iterator_category*);

        template<class>
        static no& _test(...);
    public:
        static const bool value = sizeof(_test<It>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
    };

    template<class It, bool check = is_iterator_impl<It>::value> struct is_iterator { typedef void type; };
    template<class It> struct is_iterator<It*, false> { typedef void type; };
    template<class It> struct is_iterator<It, false> { };

public:
    template<class It>
    Carray(It first, It last, typename is_iterator<It>::type *dummy = 0) {
        // create array from 2 iterators
    }
};

Now I wanted to separate implementation from the declarations, and I tried this, but I got the error:

template<class T> class Carray {
private:
    // uses SFINAE to determine if the passed in type is indeed an iterator
    template<class It> class is_iterator_impl;
    template<class It, bool check = is_iterator_impl<It>::value> struct is_iterator { typedef void type; };
    template<class It> struct is_iterator<It*, false> { typedef void type; };
    template<class It> struct is_iterator<It, false> { };
public:
    template<class It> Carray(It first, It last, typename is_iterator<It>::type *dummy = 0);
};

template<class T>
template<class It>
Carray<T>::Carray(It first, It last, typename Carray<T>::is_iterator<It>::type *dummy) {
    // create array from 2 iterators - ERROR IN THIS DEFINITION
}

template<class T>
template<class It>
class Carray<T>::is_iterator_impl {
private:
    typedef char yes[1];
    typedef char no[2];

    template<class C>
    static yes& _test(typename C::iterator_category*);

    template<class>
    static no& _test(...);
public:
    static const bool value = sizeof(_test<It>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
};

I'm using g++ 4.5.5.

share|improve this question
1  
I think you have an interesting question somewhere in here, but it is buried in pages and pages of code. Could you simplify your program down the simplest possible thing that should compile and doesn't, and post the whole thing? This way we can try compiling the program on our computers. Also if the compiler gives you an error about a specific line, you should tell us where that line is. –  David Grayson Jun 18 '11 at 17:26
    
@David Grayson: Sorry, let me change that :) The problem is that this "hack" really is pages and pages of code :) –  orlp Jun 18 '11 at 17:30
    
At least a hint in the code as to where the compiler is complaining would be nice. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 18 '11 at 17:50
    
David Rodríguez - dribeas, David Grayson: Done. –  orlp Jun 18 '11 at 17:57
    
where is line 176? –  kichik Jun 18 '11 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With these type of problems that are somehow obscure (i.e. there is quite a bit of code, and it is not simple to read in a first pass) you should provide a working (or rather failing example).

My guess is that you are missing a template keyword (Carray constructor argument):

typename Carray<T, Allocator>::template is_iterator<InputIterator>::type
//                             ^^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, I cleaned up the code now to pinpoint the problem more. –  orlp Jun 18 '11 at 17:56
    
Alright, that did it, but I never saw template being used like that. Care to explain what it does and why it is needed? –  orlp Jun 18 '11 at 18:02
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/4879184/… for a short example where this 'template' is needed. –  Sjoerd Jun 18 '11 at 18:03
    
I checked that post and this was said: "the compiler doesn't know that <member_name> is a member template". But that's not true right? It does know that, because it was declared with template<>. –  orlp Jun 18 '11 at 18:06
1  
@nightcracker: The standard requires the presence of that keyword there. The reason is that prior to instantiation and type substitution the template can be verified for correctness, and it is then when the compiler cannot know what the member is (consider that there could be specializations for different types). If you understand the need for typename in the same expression, then template is exactly the same, with the only difference that one refers to a type, and the other to a template. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 18 '11 at 18:13

Check out the semicolon at the end of every line, it looks like you have written something like this:

template<class T, class Allocator> 
template<class I, bool check> struct Carray<T, Allocator>::is_iterator

without semicolon at the end of the first line, just a guess.

share|improve this answer
    
No offense, but did you ever write C++ code with templates? –  orlp Jun 18 '11 at 17:38
1  
@nightcracker: yes I did many times, but rarely had errors. I just translated what the compiler said.... No problem indeed :) –  Tamer Shlash Jun 18 '11 at 17:42
    
And what would template<class T, class Allocator>; mean? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 18 '11 at 17:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.