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(C++ CLR based project)

The picture below shows the debugging process. Basically the program is designed to draw a simple ASCII level for a game. (30 x 30, and on each iteration of the loop draw a character (either a 'space' or a '+'))

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/52/prgramcrash.jpg/

The x is the width, y is the height. so it will loop through the width 30 times drawing a '+' each time, then the y should change the row to the next line and start drawing more '+'s. However after the 30 '+' of the first row have been drawn, the very next step i take in the debug process crashes the application (with that odd message in the bottom right corner).

It is on line 77 the crash occurs, not one other line of code is read, the program finishes printing out the 30 '+'s as planned and on the exit of the for (x) loop (returning to the for y, height loop) it just dies.

This is based off a tutorial I'm following along with and the I have watched the videos all day checking over code looking for mistakes but I'm missing something surely.

I have icnluded the whole code (code::blocks project) in a link at the bottom, but I doubt anyone here wants to help me that much :p, really im just hoping people with more experience have an idea of what might be causing this crash and give me a nudge in the right direction toward solving the problem.

I truly hope you guys can help! :D

codeblocks Project link: http://www.mediafire.com/?15nw8saa6x86b80

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closed as too localized by Kirill V. Lyadvinsky, Ken White, BЈовић, SCFrench, bmargulies Jun 19 '11 at 21:25

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Probably an index-out-of-range error on the map or titleImage variable. –  Sani Huttunen Jun 18 '11 at 18:07
    
I'd agree with Sani here, Have you checked if map[x][y] is going out of bounds? Or how about tileImage[...]? map[x][y] could be returning something not within the range index range [0, 15] that's valid for tileImage. –  Mike Bantegui Jun 18 '11 at 18:14
    
We;come to StackOverflow. Please don't provide external (off-site) links to your code. It makes it more difficult for people to see and also makes it unsearchable in relation to SO. It also makes your question less likely to be answered - I usually don't waste my time and effort going elsewhere to figure out exactly what you're asking here, unless I find the topic or question really of interest. You may also want to spend a few minutes reading the FAQ for information on how SO works, and some tips on asking questions here. :) –  Ken White Jun 18 '11 at 18:28
1  
Use managed arrays so you get a decent diagnostic for mistakes like this. Use the array<> keyword. –  Hans Passant Jun 18 '11 at 18:56
    
Sorry Ken, will not do that again, thanks for everyones comments. Mike has answered my questions and im sooo grateful. i figured my problem would require a look over the whole code, and didn;t think copying and pasting the contents of every .h and cpp file would really be inviting. –  Qas Piano Jun 18 '11 at 23:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem here is that you're defining your drawEngine to have a width and height of 80:

class DrawEngine
{
    public:
        DrawEngine (int xSize = 80, int ySize = 50);
 ...
};

Yet when you create a level, you're saying the level should be size 30x30:

bool Game::run(void)
{

    level = new Level(&drawArea, 30, 30);
    ....
}

And you set your level to have an array of size 30x30, and you pass that 30x30 array into the drawArea:

Level::Level(DrawEngine *de, int w, int h)
{
    drawArea = de;

    width = w;
    height = h;

    player = 0;

    // char** create memory for every position in the level.
    level = new char *[width];

    for (int x = 0; x < width; x++)
        level[x] = new char[height];


    //create the level
    createLevel();

    drawArea->setMap(level);
}

This loop in here is actually going out of bounds, since it's thinking it has an array that it can loop over that's size 80x80, when it's actually only 30x30:

void DrawEngine::drawBackground(void)
{
    if (map)
    {

        for (int y = 0; y < screenHeight; y++)
        {
            gotoxy(0, y);

            for (int x = 0; x < screenWidth; x++)
                cout << tileImage[map[x][y]];
        }
    }
}

So how do you solve this? Well, you have to change the sizes so they match somehow, or you add code to properly account for the fact that the screen may be larger than the actual level.

For example, you may want to do something along the lines of:

for (int x = 0; x < levelWidth; x++)
{
   for (int y = 0; y < levelHeight; y++)
   {
        // do stuff with level[x][y]
   }
}

As opposed to:

for (int x = 0; x < screenWidth; x++)
{
   for (int y = 0; y < screenHeight; y++)
   {
        // do stuff with level[x][y]
   }
}

Since in that second case

if (screenWidth > levelWidth || screenHeight > levelHeight)
 BadThingsWillHappen();
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I love you, I really do. –  Qas Piano Jun 18 '11 at 23:06

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