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I strongly feel that what I'm looking for is something quite basic, nevertheless nothing smart comes to my mind right now, so I'm asking for your help.

There is a base class A:

class A 
{
   string Code {get;set;}
}

and a child blass B:

class B : A 
{  
    DateTime ValidFrom {get;set;} 
    DateTime? ValidTo {get;set;} 
}

Imagine that there is now an instance of class A, e.g., loaded from Repository:

A a = Repository.GetById(1);

What is the most advisable approach for getting an instance of B which derives all the values a currently has (keeping in mind there might be more properties be added to both of the classes) ? Is there a name for this common pattern?

Thanks for your thoughts.

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4 Answers 4

What you really need is downcasting, but unforunately this is not allowed in C#.

A simple solution is to have a constructor:

public B (A a){
...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok and in this constructor I would then write like: this.Code = a.Code; this.... = a..., right? (Which is still error prone in case I add more properties to A) –  bonifaz Jun 18 '11 at 18:23
    
Yeah. If you want to avoid that you can use reflection to iterate through all the properties and copy their values. –  Petar Ivanov Jun 18 '11 at 18:26
    
Alright, thank you. I hoped there is a smart approach avoiding reflection. Thanks for your efforts. –  bonifaz Jun 18 '11 at 18:33

Why dont you just call a parameterize constructor in class B

public class B : A 
{  
    DateTime ValidFrom {get;set;} 
    DateTime? ValidTo {get;set;}

    public B(string code)
   {
   base.Code = code;
   } 
}

Then you could do

A a = Repository.GetById(1);
B b = new B(a.Code);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. Which benefits would that provide over passing the entire base object, as suggested below? –  bonifaz Jun 18 '11 at 18:34
    
Well, as per me, B doesn't contain class A, it just extends it, so parameterize constructor could be used to initialize the member variables. –  Abdul Muqtadir Jun 18 '11 at 20:18

If you don't want to change the contructing of your classes you could provide a copy mechanism to your classes:

class A
{
    public string Code { get; set; }

    public virtual void Copy(A other)
    {
        this.Code = other.Code;
    }
}

class B : A
{
    DateTime Start { get; set; }
    DateTime? End { get; set; }

    public override virtual void Copy(B other)
    {
        base.Copy(other);

        this.Start = other.Start;
        this.End = other.End;
    }
}

And then use something like this:

        A a = new A();
        a.Code = "XXX";
        B b = new B();
        b.Copy(a);
        b.Start = DateTime.Now;
        B b2 = new B();
        b2.Copy(b);
share|improve this answer

Other framework or libraries, or programming languages, have an object hierarchy where an instance of an object can copy the values of its fields and properties to other objects, from related, but, not exactly the same class, objects. Because, it has specific methods for copying fields or properties.

public class classRoot
{
  public string Name { get; set; }

  public virtual void assignFrom(myRootClass objSource)
  {
     if (objSource != null) {
       this.Name = objSource.Name;
     }
  }

  public virtual void assignTo(ref myRootClass objDest)
  {
     if (objDest != null) {
       objDest.Name = this.Name;
     }
  }
}

public class classFoo: classRoot
{
  public Color Color { get; set; }

  public override void assignFrom(myRootClass objSource) { updateChanges(); }
  public override void assignTo(ref myRootClass objDest) { updateChanges(); }
}

public class classBar: classRoot
{
  public int Age { get; set; }

  public override void assignFrom(myRootClass objSource) { updateChanges(); }
  public override void assignTo(ref myRootClass objDest) { updateChanges(); }
}

public class classDemo
{
  public void anyMethod()
  {
    classFoo objFoo = new classFoo("Foo1");
    classFoo objBar = new classBar("Bar2");

    MessageBox.Show("Name: " + objFoo);
    objBar.AssignTo(ref objFoo);
    MessageBox.Show("Name: " + objFoo);
  }
}

Don't confuse this concept, with the make a "clone()", or make a "deepCopy()" or make "shallowCopy()", altought in some cases are solved with this function.

Those functions help when you want to make a new object with the same class, and you want to copy data from an existing object to another existing object, where the classes are related, but may not be exactly the same thing.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok and in the assignFrom/assignTo I would then write like: this.Name = myRootClass.Name? (including the same constraints and potential source of error as in fiver's suggestion above) –  bonifaz Jun 18 '11 at 18:25
    
@bonifaz, I add some extra code, its just an example, not finished code ;-) –  umlcat Jun 18 '11 at 18:32

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